Date   

La Semaine du Golfe Morbihan

 

While looking through the Events section of the Worldwide Classic Boat Show I stumbled upon this video about the great festival held every other year in Brittany. What makes La Semaine du Golfe Morbihan special, other than it's size and the variety of watercraft that show up, is that it moves around to several ports on the gulf, so there's plenty of boating involved:

https://youtu.be/qNZ9DAs1S9U

https://www.semainedugolfe.com/

Lots of other interesting stuff at Worldwide Classic Boat Show. I hope They try it again next year, even if we emerge from the pandemic by then. It's a great idea. Could use some improvements, but this is Their first try...

https://classicboatshow.com/

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A society that gets rid of all its troublemakers goes downhill. (Robert A. Heinlein)


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Re: Windmills used to pump bilges

 

A perusal of the Marhst-L archive came up with this:

Bill Bunting:

"Although the North Atlantic is one of the most hazardous of oceans the American-built ships that ended up in the Canadian/UK timber trade in the late 1800s were usually well into their dotage and under another flag, very often Norwegian and thus fitted with a windmill pump, per Norwegian law. I suspect that many had previously been under a German flag -- when American square-riggers had lost the blush of youth they were commonly sold at Hamburg into the trans-Atlantic barreled oil trade, which was a year-round trade. German captains were very proud of their "petroleum klippers“ and particularly liked the commodious cabins."

I wonder what the Norwegian law was about. Surely it wouldn't have required wind-powered pumps on all sailing ships, no matter their afe and condition. But one would probably have to be able to read Norwegian to find out. <g>

Jim Shuttleworth:

"The windmill is probably an Onker. A SCANDINAVIAN device to pump the
bilge. I have a painting of Dashing Wave with one, 1902, inbound off San Francisco by C. Volquards. I have seen photos of other vessels with them. There were many Scandinavian sailors on US West Coast."

A separate search of the Interweb found an article claiming that Dashing Wave's windmill was her skipper's (named Morehouse -- not very Scandihoovian) invention, but I'll bet he cribbed the idea from the Norwegians. <g>

http://cablecarguy.blogspot.com/2011/01/windmill-at-sea-january-27-2011.html

Another image of an ancient ship with a windmill pump:

https://www.windmillworld.com/world/newzealand/ships.htm

On 2/19/2021 6:36 AM, Pete L wrote:
now, here is an interesting sentence from the book "A Floating Home"...
"A barque, such as is often bought by a Norwegian trader in timber, and spends her remaining days being pumped out by a windmill on deck..."
Any local knowledge on using small windmills to pump bilge water?
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I get up every morning determined both to change the world and to have one hell of a good time. Sometimes this makes planning the day difficult. (E. B. White)
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Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Pete Leenhouts
 

oops - sorry for the wrong steer. Pete


-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Feb 20, 2021 1:48 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Ah, I see, the title is actually "a floating home". by Ionides.
-Jove

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 1:46 PM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
I can't find "a life afloat" on the shipbuilding list. what am I missing?
-Jove

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
John, that was such a great find!  

One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list. 

The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show off the group! 

WR/Pete
RIPTIDE
  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


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Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Ah, I see, the title is actually "a floating home". by Ionides.
-Jove


On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 1:46 PM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
I can't find "a life afloat" on the shipbuilding list. what am I missing?
-Jove

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
John, that was such a great find!  

One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list. 

The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show off the group! 

WR/Pete
RIPTIDE
  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


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Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

I can't find "a life afloat" on the shipbuilding list. what am I missing?
-Jove

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
John, that was such a great find!  

One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list. 

The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show off the group! 

WR/Pete
RIPTIDE
  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


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Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Pete Leenhouts
 

John, that was such a great find!  

One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list. 

The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show off the group! 

WR/Pete
RIPTIDE
  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.







Windmills used to pump bilges

Pete Leenhouts
 

now, here is an interesting sentence from the book "A Floating Home"...

"A barque, such as is often bought by a Norwegian trader in timber, and spends her remaining days being pumped out by a windmill on deck..."

Any local knowledge on using small windmills to pump bilge water? 

Wr/Pete
RIPTIDE  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


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Worldwide Classic Boat Show

 

After some difficulties, I've put some photos into the pages They gave us in the virtual show. Alas, They only allowed 12 photos, but we got two pages -- one for the Coots, and another for the Oregon Coots TSCA Chapter. The tickets are only $5, so give the show a try.

https://classicboatshow.com/listing/oregon-coots/

https://classicboatshow.com/listing/traditional-small-craft-association-oregon-coots-chapter/


We just poured margaritas to celebrate John, and we hope you'll join us.

The gates open to the new Worldwide Classic Boat Show Friday morning at 10:00 a.m. (Maine time), and we just "finished" the show's website.  It's even better than we had envisioned.

 
Get Your Ticket Here ($5 for entire show)

GIFT TICKETS (also $5)


THE WORLDWIDE CLASSIC BOAT SHOW
created by Off Center Harbor


Dates:  February 19th to 28th
Location:  Online at ClassicBoatShow.com
Tickets:  $5 (seriously)

 












 


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-- 
John <jkohnen@...>
If you are not a thinking man, to what purpose are you a man at all? (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

 

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/library/types_of_canoes_on_puget_sound_1920.pdf

Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
https://preview.tinyurl.com/3yycc5ql
or
http://www.survivorlibrary.com/index.php/8-category/123-library-shipbuilding
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion. (Francis Bacon)
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This guy was definitely a coot!

Case Turner
 

Pretty neat solution for dry docking.


Case

Sent from not here

--
Dirt


Re: Snowbound Boatbuilding

Ken Preston
 

The braided rug is primarily for getting at low bits of work. . .I don't bend over as well as I used to and my bifocals only work a certain way, so my best shot is to lie down full length on the rug and scrunch around until I can reach AND SEE what I need to do. . .besides the rug, a 1' cube made out of six pieces of plywood is never far away. . .something to use to lean on to get stood back up again.  A step stool does well too, but the cube is good no matter which way it lands.  <grin!>
Ken


Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

 

Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.

https://preview.tinyurl.com/3yycc5ql

or

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/index.php/8-category/123-library-shipbuilding

"Ship Building Made Easy" Hmmm. <g> Alas, a lot of the illustrations are missing in the scans. Makes some of the books worthless. :o(

On 2/16/2021 11:45 AM, Myles J S wrote:
I friend of mine sent me this link to a list of interest to boat lovers and builders. They seem to be on a slow server, only bring up one page at a time, and have lots of blank pages before you get to the good stuff, but the price is right. Hit the highlighted PDF at the end of each title and then click on the first box below the link which will be labelled Open Link
Library-Shipbuilding (survivorlibrary.com)
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Men with the muckrake are often indispensable to the well-being of society. (Theodore Roosevelt)
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lots of reading material on shipbuilding

MylesJ Swift
 

I friend of mine sent me this link to a list of interest to boat lovers and builders. They seem to be on a slow server, only bring up one page at a time, and have lots of blank pages before you get to the good stuff, but the price is right. Hit the highlighted PDF at the end of each title and then click on the first box below the link which will be labelled Open Link

Library-Shipbuilding (survivorlibrary.com)


Re: Snowbound Boatbuilding

Dan
 

Wow! that braided rug is a real nice touch...I think there might be one
of those on my shop floor too. Someplace under the 'pox drips, paint
pools, and resident sawdust. (Much like PL's) this place looks like a
doctor's office! Nice. dan.


Re: Snowbound Boatbuilding

Ken Preston
 

Not only is it indoors, there's a propane heater too!  I can even epoxy in this weather.  Now if I'd only built the shop before I was 60. . .but one does what one can with whatever one has while one can. . .
Today I'm going to take the midships bulkhead back out and dress up one edge of it a bit. . .darn, should have seen that before now. . .
Ken
(still plenty of snow, but I think I can get the truck up the driveway this afternoon)


Re: Snowbound Boatbuilding

Richard Green
 

An indoor boatbuilding project……indoor……heavy sigh.  

Rich

On Feb 16, 2021, at 5:21 AM, Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts@...> wrote:

always have been partial to those boats. Nice looking shop, too - nothing like mine! 

Pete
Port Ludlow Wa
not much snow left! 


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: Oregon Coots <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Feb 16, 2021 1:48 am
Subject: [oregoncoots] Snowbound Boatbuilding

I hope all of you are surviving the bad weather alright. The cold only
reached down a bit south of Albany, so I'm doing fine.

Ken P has been working on a Michalak AF4 Breve while snowed in up on
Bainbridge Island. The sides have been dry-fit to the frames, stem and
transom. (See attachment) I hope we see it on the water next summer.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Winter is icumen in,/Lhude sing Goddamm,/Raineth drop and staineth
slop,/And how the wind doth ramm!/Sing: Goddam. (Ezra Pound)



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Re: Snowbound Boatbuilding

Pete Leenhouts
 

always have been partial to those boats. Nice looking shop, too - nothing like mine! 

Pete
Port Ludlow Wa
not much snow left! 


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: Oregon Coots <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Feb 16, 2021 1:48 am
Subject: [oregoncoots] Snowbound Boatbuilding

I hope all of you are surviving the bad weather alright. The cold only
reached down a bit south of Albany, so I'm doing fine.

Ken P has been working on a Michalak AF4 Breve while snowed in up on
Bainbridge Island. The sides have been dry-fit to the frames, stem and
transom. (See attachment) I hope we see it on the water next summer.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Winter is icumen in,/Lhude sing Goddamm,/Raineth drop and staineth
slop,/And how the wind doth ramm!/Sing: Goddam. (Ezra Pound)



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Snowbound Boatbuilding

 

I hope all of you are surviving the bad weather alright. The cold only reached down a bit south of Albany, so I'm doing fine.

Ken P has been working on a Michalak AF4 Breve while snowed in up on Bainbridge Island. The sides have been dry-fit to the frames, stem and transom. (See attachment) I hope we see it on the water next summer.

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Winter is icumen in,/Lhude sing Goddamm,/Raineth drop and staineth slop,/And how the wind doth ramm!/Sing: Goddam. (Ezra Pound)



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Re: Willys

 

I don't know if there's a limit on attachments, but you didn't reach it, Dan. I got to see them all when you first posted them. You're email program may be set up so _it_ limits the amount of data it automatically downloads. There's probably a way to "download entire message", or something like that...

On 2/13/2021 4:44 PM, Dan M wrote:
There appear to be limits on the number of attachments, so here are more that were to be with the original post.  The first is "willys points"; the second shows a portion of the bodywork, which looks good from about 25'.   If the third picture makes it, shows the wagon with the Pelican attached.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Literally no man has more wholly outlived life than I. And still it's good fun. (Robert Louis Stevenson)
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Re: Cedar oar work

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Not sure if it's the same in OZ, but In the UK and Ireland Knock usually means a light blow, or "tap". you could knock a nail in with a hammer, or knock something into alignment.
I've not heard of knocking in a sexual reference, except for "getting knocked up".
knockers meant boobs where I grew up in Ireland.
-Jove


On Sun, Feb 14, 2021 at 9:32 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Well, that was fun, but here's what the instructions say about
"knocking". Dan put his blades in slits in the shaft, but the
instructions just say to screw and glue them to the back of the shaft.
One screw, then "knock" the blade into alignment and let the goo cure:

"The blade: Can be home made or bought (Gaco is one source). It is best
attached to the back of the shaft with one screw and epoxy bog. Now
knock the blade into alignment and allow the glue to set."

One of the sea songs I listen to has this line:

"When I was a young man in my prime
I'd knock those yeller girls two at a time"

And that's _not_ from the "Uncensored Sailor Songs" disc. <g>

On 2/13/2021 8:53 PM, Jamie wrote:
> Richard, you're most likely right.  British slang is not consistent.  A
> common expression is (or was when I was younger) "I'll knock you up in
> the morning." Meaning I will contact you in the morning.
>
> I took the same meaning from it as you did.  I mean, I just can't
> picture how that's gonna work using John's interpretation!
--
John <jkohnen@...>
It is only great souls that know how much glory there is in being good.
(Sophocles)


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