Date   

Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Pete Leenhouts
 

Great trip report, Jove!  

WR/Pete
Port Ludlow WA


-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 11, 2021 6:04 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Hey folks, Here is my trip update.
There will be some extra detail that I'm putting in mostly for myself, such as fuel numbers, but you might also find it interesting.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, 2 days motoring, a couple hours sailing. We covered 31 nautical miles the first day, and 42nm on the 2nd day.
Stayed on Blake island the 1st night. We got lucky and barely got rained on at all, even had sun the majority of the trip. But we did have a head wind the the 30s and 40s most of the way and could see our breath in the cabin often except in the evenings when we ran a heater on shore power, and the diesel heat at times. Hit the narrows right, at low slack and had no issue. We went through the Colvos passage west of Vashon island, It was calm and helped our progress. We had around 0.4 kts against us, but avoiding the other 2 sides of the triangle and the extra traffic was worth it.

We had myself and 2 crew on board.
Erin didn't want to "drive the boat" so Andrew and I took turns every couple hours. Although she was quick to take the tiller when we were under sail.... the truth comes out after all.
We left the dock at 8.30 each day, after stowing everything, using the bathroom and making the first coffee. This gave us really calm conditions for the first couple hours. We could have left earlier, sunrise was 7.30, but it wasn't desirable or necessary.

Day one started, gently motoring out of Everett marina into a calm sunny and cold day, with a light headwind.
We had run the motor, checked the diesel and gathered an extra 15 gallons in jerry cans from a service station the night before. We didn't know how much the boat would use, it has a universal M4-30 which makes 23 bhp, a little googling suggested it would be between 1 and 2 gallons per hour. With no fuel gauge, I used a dipstick and a tape measure to keep track during the trip.
We made breakfast and scrubbed the deck underway.
Ferry's move really fast and come out at 17kts, it's important to keep your head on a swivel for them, Some of them run every 20 mins. so one will pass ahead of you, and then another behind you in a pretty short period of time. But we only once had to change course to make it clear that we saw him and were not going to get in the way.
image.png 
image.png
image.png
The first day we were hoping to make Shilshole, or Port Madison, Edmunds was our "ditch the trip" location. When we got to shilshole it was still lunch time, we agreed to make for Blake island.
Crossing the sound, where you see the 305 on the map below, was the choppiest part of the trip with a headwind in the high teens, and enough chop to make the hull slap occasionally, our progress slowed to a little over 3kts. Most of the trip we made 5 kts under power, sometimes 6 if it was calm or with a slight tidal help. I had tried to time the part of the month so we'd get some todal help each day, which mostly worked out with a low tide in the morning that could help us along as it filled up.

Blake island is a state marine park with a ~4 mile perimeter. The docks there were half empty, because of Winter, and Covid, and Sunday night, from what I hear it's usually full by 10 AM. It was $23.10 for a 33ft boat.
Blake island is beautiful, there are sweet little anchorages and mooring balls on the south and west sides.
We hiked the island loop trail around 4 miles, after which we were wiped from a long day, made food, had a beer and went to bed.

Navigation was done mostly with "Open CPN" on a laptop, with "Navionics" app on phone as a secondary, and this worked well. The boat had a bulkhead chart plotter which was running too.
We also used "deep zoom" to look at tides & currents, And NOAA marine weather etc.
There was an AIS alarm on the VHF that gave an alarm whenever commercial ships entered out 5nm radius. Which was both helpful and a little annoying.
I also had a cruising guide that gave overall maps of the area, and detailed maps of key marinas and anchorages with descriptions. I did not have full size paper charts. A waterproof flip chart is on my short shopping list.
image.png   image.png 
image.png  image.png
image.png image.png

We were elated to make it through the narrows around noon on day 2, please with the progress.
We saw a number of Harbor Porpoises in the big eddy at "fish haven" which is an underwater mount around 40 ft deep after the narrows heading south.
The small passages below McNiel island were beautiful and calm. McNiel island is a prison, you can see the old disused prison from the water, but the modern facility is in the center of the island and houses sex offenders.... who knew.

As we turned into budd inlet above Olympia we finally had the wind and time on our side and we hoisted sail for an hour or so. Practiced tacking, Reefing and Pointing.
The boat moved along quite nicely at around half the apparent wind on a close reach. 3.5kts in 7kts apparent. I didn't have time for a thorough impression of sailing performance, but I'm looking forward to learning more, and at least happy it's not a slug. PHRF is 180 I believe.
image.png image.png 
image.png image.png

Fuel, measured with a cane and a tape measure.
Start 9" out of 11" in tank.
3 hrs at 2500rpm 5kts, 16nm fuel dropped 1",
3h20, harder motoring, fuel dropped 1.5"
Olympia, fuel at 4.5" down from 6.5 at blake, down 2" in 7 hrs.
5 gallons of fuel brough fuel up from 4.5 to 7, 2.5" rise. So 1/2" is about one gallon.
Total drop, 4.5" (from the refill we know this is 9 gallons), total time 13.5, thus 0.66 gallons per hour average, up to 1 gallon per hour when fighting chop.
There has to be a better way than a stick and a tape measure, but this seems to work.

We had two "oh shit" moments, one was when the bilge pump kicked in while under sail on day 2, it filled the cockpit with an inch of water in about 30 seconds and had us diving through cupboards looking for a leaking through hull, we concluded that it was simply build up from drips from the cutlass bearing after 2 days of motoring.
The other moment was coming into the slip, I took the wrong slip (not the one I'd paid for) and had to leave the marina and do it over. Andrew took the opportunity to show me how to use prop walk and prop walk to turn the boat on a dime. It was working until the energetic use of the throttle made the lever slip on it's shaft and we were stuck (in idle luckily). I decided this would work and managed to dock it in idle by playing the forward Neutral reverse lever. The throttle is on a round shaft with a pinch screw. I'm planning to drill it and put a stainless spring pin/roll pin through it or similarly ruggedize this joint. I was not able to get it any tighter with the pinch screw, a bolt and nut may work. Advice welcomed. I'm sure I will find an endless stream of small upgrades like this. I already replaced the main-sheet fiddle block which was made in england from futnol and looks ancient. The boat will be 50 next year, I'll have to plan a party.
image.png  image.png
The boat is settled in at West Bay marina in Olympia.
We met many of the friendly neighbors on adjacent boats. Some are active sailors. There are other boats there that have 100lbs of muscles growing on the rudder alone, it's kind of amazing. I don't know how long that takes. But it's clearly a good location for shellfish.

Endless thanks to my crew, they were perfect. Endlessly helpful, filled with knowledge and forethought, and great company.
image.png
Thanks for reading, and for all your tips before the trip.
Here's hoping the pictures send.
-Jove


Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

  I guess, for the same reasons we don't see biplanes much anymore.
-Jove

On Thu, Feb 11, 2021 at 4:30 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
The logical progression leads to the really fast sailing
vessels/vehicles having a single sail, like iceboats and speed record boats:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/fej94x9w

or

https://www.cnn.com/videos/sports/2017/06/09/paul-larsen-sailing-speed-record-vestas-sailrocket-americas-cup-mainsail-orig.cnn

On 2/11/2021 10:07 AM, Jove wrote:
> Thanks Rich, interesting stuff.
> It seems from my experience and what I've read you can often point
> higher with a smaller jib. There is probably a wind speed or boat speed
> above which the big genoa is giving more windage than speed.
> You'll notice that a lot of race boats have smaller gibs that don't go
> full height, The new AC36 foil boats have a half height gib, and look
> like a fractional, even though they have the head stay running to the
> mast head.
> Of course they are a totally different kettle of fish, with double
> surface wing sails etc,  but the principles apply I think.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Winter blues are  cured every time with a potato gratin paired with a
roast chicken. (Alexandra Guarnaschelli)


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Re: Cedar oar work

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Very nice Dan. Thanks for sharing.
-Jove

On Thu, Feb 11, 2021 at 5:29 PM dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:


Some pictures of progress- this one is of the blanks, cut from one 2X4, the diagonal cut done with this wonderful saw.



Below, the oars are sanded and shaped using this classic plane, probably the first time it's been used in 50-60 years, blade still sharp.



After planing ,sanding, and cutting in the handles.   In this picture, the insect damage can be seen, this will be filled in with epoxy thickened with wood flour.



Here's where they are now, with the blade slot cut and blade inserted. 



Next, will work to make the handles smaller- they're great for me, but not for smaller hands.  And, stare at them a bit- debate whether to make the oars thinner.  Then, need to color match the epoxy and fill the holes, and epoxy in the blades.  And glass them in the oarlock area, too. Oars are lightweight, as desired.

Dan




































Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Hey folks, Here is my trip update.
There will be some extra detail that I'm putting in mostly for myself, such as fuel numbers, but you might also find it interesting.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, 2 days motoring, a couple hours sailing. We covered 31 nautical miles the first day, and 42nm on the 2nd day.
Stayed on Blake island the 1st night. We got lucky and barely got rained on at all, even had sun the majority of the trip. But we did have a head wind the the 30s and 40s most of the way and could see our breath in the cabin often except in the evenings when we ran a heater on shore power, and the diesel heat at times. Hit the narrows right, at low slack and had no issue. We went through the Colvos passage west of Vashon island, It was calm and helped our progress. We had around 0.4 kts against us, but avoiding the other 2 sides of the triangle and the extra traffic was worth it.

We had myself and 2 crew on board.
Erin didn't want to "drive the boat" so Andrew and I took turns every couple hours. Although she was quick to take the tiller when we were under sail.... the truth comes out after all.
We left the dock at 8.30 each day, after stowing everything, using the bathroom and making the first coffee. This gave us really calm conditions for the first couple hours. We could have left earlier, sunrise was 7.30, but it wasn't desirable or necessary.

Day one started, gently motoring out of Everett marina into a calm sunny and cold day, with a light headwind.
We had run the motor, checked the diesel and gathered an extra 15 gallons in jerry cans from a service station the night before. We didn't know how much the boat would use, it has a universal M4-30 which makes 23 bhp, a little googling suggested it would be between 1 and 2 gallons per hour. With no fuel gauge, I used a dipstick and a tape measure to keep track during the trip.
We made breakfast and scrubbed the deck underway.
Ferry's move really fast and come out at 17kts, it's important to keep your head on a swivel for them, Some of them run every 20 mins. so one will pass ahead of you, and then another behind you in a pretty short period of time. But we only once had to change course to make it clear that we saw him and were not going to get in the way.
image.png 
image.png
image.png
The first day we were hoping to make Shilshole, or Port Madison, Edmunds was our "ditch the trip" location. When we got to shilshole it was still lunch time, we agreed to make for Blake island.
Crossing the sound, where you see the 305 on the map below, was the choppiest part of the trip with a headwind in the high teens, and enough chop to make the hull slap occasionally, our progress slowed to a little over 3kts. Most of the trip we made 5 kts under power, sometimes 6 if it was calm or with a slight tidal help. I had tried to time the part of the month so we'd get some todal help each day, which mostly worked out with a low tide in the morning that could help us along as it filled up.

Blake island is a state marine park with a ~4 mile perimeter. The docks there were half empty, because of Winter, and Covid, and Sunday night, from what I hear it's usually full by 10 AM. It was $23.10 for a 33ft boat.
Blake island is beautiful, there are sweet little anchorages and mooring balls on the south and west sides.
We hiked the island loop trail around 4 miles, after which we were wiped from a long day, made food, had a beer and went to bed.

Navigation was done mostly with "Open CPN" on a laptop, with "Navionics" app on phone as a secondary, and this worked well. The boat had a bulkhead chart plotter which was running too.
We also used "deep zoom" to look at tides & currents, And NOAA marine weather etc.
There was an AIS alarm on the VHF that gave an alarm whenever commercial ships entered out 5nm radius. Which was both helpful and a little annoying.
I also had a cruising guide that gave overall maps of the area, and detailed maps of key marinas and anchorages with descriptions. I did not have full size paper charts. A waterproof flip chart is on my short shopping list.
image.png   image.png 
image.png  image.png
image.png image.png

We were elated to make it through the narrows around noon on day 2, please with the progress.
We saw a number of Harbor Porpoises in the big eddy at "fish haven" which is an underwater mount around 40 ft deep after the narrows heading south.
The small passages below McNiel island were beautiful and calm. McNiel island is a prison, you can see the old disused prison from the water, but the modern facility is in the center of the island and houses sex offenders.... who knew.

As we turned into budd inlet above Olympia we finally had the wind and time on our side and we hoisted sail for an hour or so. Practiced tacking, Reefing and Pointing.
The boat moved along quite nicely at around half the apparent wind on a close reach. 3.5kts in 7kts apparent. I didn't have time for a thorough impression of sailing performance, but I'm looking forward to learning more, and at least happy it's not a slug. PHRF is 180 I believe.
image.png image.png 
image.png image.png

Fuel, measured with a cane and a tape measure.
Start 9" out of 11" in tank.
3 hrs at 2500rpm 5kts, 16nm fuel dropped 1",
3h20, harder motoring, fuel dropped 1.5"
Olympia, fuel at 4.5" down from 6.5 at blake, down 2" in 7 hrs.
5 gallons of fuel brough fuel up from 4.5 to 7, 2.5" rise. So 1/2" is about one gallon.
Total drop, 4.5" (from the refill we know this is 9 gallons), total time 13.5, thus 0.66 gallons per hour average, up to 1 gallon per hour when fighting chop.
There has to be a better way than a stick and a tape measure, but this seems to work.

We had two "oh shit" moments, one was when the bilge pump kicked in while under sail on day 2, it filled the cockpit with an inch of water in about 30 seconds and had us diving through cupboards looking for a leaking through hull, we concluded that it was simply build up from drips from the cutlass bearing after 2 days of motoring.
The other moment was coming into the slip, I took the wrong slip (not the one I'd paid for) and had to leave the marina and do it over. Andrew took the opportunity to show me how to use prop walk and prop walk to turn the boat on a dime. It was working until the energetic use of the throttle made the lever slip on it's shaft and we were stuck (in idle luckily). I decided this would work and managed to dock it in idle by playing the forward Neutral reverse lever. The throttle is on a round shaft with a pinch screw. I'm planning to drill it and put a stainless spring pin/roll pin through it or similarly ruggedize this joint. I was not able to get it any tighter with the pinch screw, a bolt and nut may work. Advice welcomed. I'm sure I will find an endless stream of small upgrades like this. I already replaced the main-sheet fiddle block which was made in england from futnol and looks ancient. The boat will be 50 next year, I'll have to plan a party.
image.png  image.png
The boat is settled in at West Bay marina in Olympia.
We met many of the friendly neighbors on adjacent boats. Some are active sailors. There are other boats there that have 100lbs of muscles growing on the rudder alone, it's kind of amazing. I don't know how long that takes. But it's clearly a good location for shellfish.

Endless thanks to my crew, they were perfect. Endlessly helpful, filled with knowledge and forethought, and great company.
image.png
Thanks for reading, and for all your tips before the trip.
Here's hoping the pictures send.
-Jove


Cedar oar work

dan mulholland
 



Some pictures of progress- this one is of the blanks, cut from one 2X4, the diagonal cut done with this wonderful saw.



Below, the oars are sanded and shaped using this classic plane, probably the first time it's been used in 50-60 years, blade still sharp.



After planing ,sanding, and cutting in the handles.   In this picture, the insect damage can be seen, this will be filled in with epoxy thickened with wood flour.



Here's where they are now, with the blade slot cut and blade inserted. 



Next, will work to make the handles smaller- they're great for me, but not for smaller hands.  And, stare at them a bit- debate whether to make the oars thinner.  Then, need to color match the epoxy and fill the holes, and epoxy in the blades.  And glass them in the oarlock area, too. Oars are lightweight, as desired.

Dan




































Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

 

The logical progression leads to the really fast sailing vessels/vehicles having a single sail, like iceboats and speed record boats:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/fej94x9w

or

https://www.cnn.com/videos/sports/2017/06/09/paul-larsen-sailing-speed-record-vestas-sailrocket-americas-cup-mainsail-orig.cnn

On 2/11/2021 10:07 AM, Jove wrote:
Thanks Rich, interesting stuff.
It seems from my experience and what I've read you can often point higher with a smaller jib. There is probably a wind speed or boat speed above which the big genoa is giving more windage than speed.
You'll notice that a lot of race boats have smaller gibs that don't go full height, The new AC36 foil boats have a half height gib, and look like a fractional, even though they have the head stay running to the mast head.
Of course they are a totally different kettle of fish, with double surface wing sails etc,  but the principles apply I think.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Winter blues are cured every time with a potato gratin paired with a roast chicken. (Alexandra Guarnaschelli)
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Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

 

Brandon's description of how his heavy weather staysail is rigged makes me think that my ideas for jib handling on Tuffy aren't completely crazy. Although I'll never be taking her to sea, it's common to have light winds on Fern Ridge early in the day, strong winds in the afternoon, and light winds again in the evening, so being able to easily switch between big and little jibs would be useful.

Brandon taught some of us Coots how to make those soft shackles:

https://flic.kr/s/aHskedS5ar

On 2/11/2021 1:53 PM, Jove wrote:
Thanks Brandon. good advice for the sound.
Those soft shackles look pretty good.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
War will exist until that distant day when the conscientious objector enjoys the same reputation and prestige that the warrior does today. (John F. Kennedy)
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Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks Brandon. good advice for the sound.
Those soft shackles look pretty good.
-Jove

On Thu, Feb 11, 2021 at 12:19 PM Brandon via groups.io <brandonfordus=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Jove,

It depends on how and where you are going to use the boat, whether a Solent stay makes sense. I haven't seen any on boats in Puget Sound. That probably because when the sun is out and people feel like going out in a boat there is almost never wind. The chances of getting "caught out in a blow" in the Sound are slim to none. If you have longer range asperations (like sailing to England and in the Solent) then it might make sense. I'd spend my money on an asymmetrical or cruising spinnaker.

Oceanus is rigged as a sloop but has provision for a staysail with a wire luff that is shackled to a deck fitting and then hoisted by a wire halyard to hounds that are four or five feet above the spreaders. I've got a storm staysail that I like a lot and a light-air "reaching" staysail that can go under a spinnaker or fly on the opposite side of the genny. We had really light winds from astern for three days on our crossing to Hawaii. The main was banging around, so I dropped it and we sailed with a polled out genny to starboard and the reaching staysail on the other side. Worked great even with the Hydrovane steering. And it was quiet enough that we could sleep.

Brandon
Olympia and Longview, Wash.



Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

Brandon
 

Jove,

It depends on how and where you are going to use the boat, whether a Solent stay makes sense. I haven't seen any on boats in Puget Sound. That probably because when the sun is out and people feel like going out in a boat there is almost never wind. The chances of getting "caught out in a blow" in the Sound are slim to none. If you have longer range asperations (like sailing to England and in the Solent) then it might make sense. I'd spend my money on an asymmetrical or cruising spinnaker.

Oceanus is rigged as a sloop but has provision for a staysail with a wire luff that is shackled to a deck fitting and then hoisted by a wire halyard to hounds that are four or five feet above the spreaders. I've got a storm staysail that I like a lot and a light-air "reaching" staysail that can go under a spinnaker or fly on the opposite side of the genny. We had really light winds from astern for three days on our crossing to Hawaii. The main was banging around, so I dropped it and we sailed with a polled out genny to starboard and the reaching staysail on the other side. Worked great even with the Hydrovane steering. And it was quiet enough that we could sleep.

Brandon
Olympia and Longview, Wash.



Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks Rich, interesting stuff.
It seems from my experience and what I've read you can often point higher with a smaller jib. There is probably a wind speed or boat speed above which the big genoa is giving more windage than speed.
You'll notice that a lot of race boats have smaller gibs that don't go full height, The new AC36 foil boats have a half height gib, and look like a fractional, even though they have the head stay running to the mast head.
Of course they are a totally different kettle of fish, with double surface wing sails etc,  but the principles apply I think.

image.png


On Wed, Feb 10, 2021 at 9:27 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'm glad the trip to Olympia went well, Jove. I too am eager to read
your report on the adventure.

I've heard of something like that, but the term "Solent stay" didn't
ring a bell. But I don't recall what else they might have been called...
Seems like a good idea for a cruiser with a roller furling jib. You'll
have to unfasten it when using the Genoa

I've been toying with the idea of something like that for Tuffy, so I
can use different jibs without having to climb out on that tiny
foredeck. One of my ideas is to use high-tech low-stretch line for the
jib halyard, and the same line for a tack downhaul leading back to near
the cockpit. The jibs would have wire of low-stretch line in their
luffs. I've got a cute little bronze winch that could set the halyard,
or downhaul, up tight enough so the whole works takes the strain off the
headstay, acting as an "acting" headstay and, hopefully, keeping the jib
luff tight enough. To change jibs, I'd slack the downhaul and halyard,
pull the sail back to the cockpit, and swap sails. When I go get Tuffy's
mainsail back from Kendall I should ask him of I'm crazy. <g>

But this year I'll just try to be happy with the little jib, and the
newly loose-footed mainsail. :o)

On 2/10/2021 3:18 PM, Jove wrote:
> Hey John,
> A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's
> usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed
> against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a
> sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits
> of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back
> stays.
> It may have other names.
> Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.
>
> The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the
> other thread later.
--
John <jkohnen@...>
I don't know whether it is horse sense or horse something else, but if
they like it I know where there is a whole pile of it. (L. Francis
Herreshoff to an editor when told that readers liked his "horse sense")


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Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

Richard Green
 

Glad the trip went well, will there be a book in the offing?  Short but sweet?  

When I sailed Passage in the higher winds of the Astoria reach I had a taste too much weather helm shortening sails notwithstanding so when I pulled the boat to redo the ridiculously small vee berth I redesigned the bow extending it on a teak layered sprit 12” which proved to be just right for my sails and hull.  To shorten this too long story, I added a baby stay from the spreaders/sidestays area to a new fitting I had cast in bronze (when it was a local event) and mounted to the reinforced area spanning the anchor locker bulkhead.  While I left if up all the time, the only interference was when I was tacking the genny and it would sort of slide through the approximate three foot gap.  I had the baby stays’l, about 55 sq ft, on all the time as occasionally winds in the fifty mph range would spring up out of Young’s Bay and with no engine ever I had to be prepared.  In the photo sailing, the wind is 35 mph as measured on the boat taking the photo.  This was behind Tongue Point exiting the bay so no fetch for waves to speak of.  Boat balance beautifully with double reef main and stays’l.  In the odd fifty mph, I sailed stays’l only and was a happy camper.  

Rich



On Feb 10, 2021, at 3:18 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:

Hey John,
A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back stays.
It may have other names.
Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the other thread later.
-Jove

On Sun, Jan 31, 2021 at 2:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Here's an entertaining way to get a Big Picture of what the wind is doing:

https://earth.nullschool.net/

Solent stay?

On 1/30/2021 6:23 PM, Jove wrote:
> Yes, I am becoming quite familiar with this predicament. Northerly winds
> in the summer, Southerly in the winter, but winter winds are cold and
> the weather is often stormy.
> I went around the whole trailerable/non-trailerable boat thing for a
> while, and at this point I want to try out the bigger boat stuff for a
> chapter.
> Hawaii sounds ok.
> We'll see how it goes.
> I'm also realizing that the daily sea winds in the strait of Juan de
> fuca can be a pretty good challenge. "wind river" was mentioned on this
> mailing list recently.
> Beating to windward is where I'll really need a smaller tighter
> headsail, and that idea of a solent stay will probably be the answer to
> that.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the
absence of power. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


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Solent Stay (was: Jove got a bigger boat.)

 

I forgot to mention that Tuffy came with an uninstalled roller furler. Kendall says it could be used as a roller reefer, but I don't like what that would do to the sail shape. A big Genny on the furler and a "Solent stay" for smaller jibs might be an option...

On 2/10/2021 9:27 PM, I wrote:
...
I've been toying with the idea of something like that for Tuffy, so I can use different jibs without having to climb out on that tiny foredeck. One of my ideas is to use high-tech low-stretch line for the jib halyard, and the same line for a tack downhaul leading back to near the cockpit. The jibs would have wire of low-stretch line in their luffs. I've got a cute little bronze winch that could set the halyard, or downhaul, up tight enough so the whole works takes the strain off the headstay, acting as an "acting" headstay and, hopefully, keeping the jib luff tight enough. To change jibs, I'd slack the downhaul and halyard, pull the sail back to the cockpit, and swap sails. When I go get Tuffy's mainsail back from Kendall I should ask him of I'm crazy. <g>
But this year I'll just try to be happy with the little jib, and the newly loose-footed mainsail. :o)
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The ideals which have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been Kindness, Beauty, and Truth. (Albert Einstein)
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Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

 

I'm glad the trip to Olympia went well, Jove. I too am eager to read your report on the adventure.

I've heard of something like that, but the term "Solent stay" didn't ring a bell. But I don't recall what else they might have been called... Seems like a good idea for a cruiser with a roller furling jib. You'll have to unfasten it when using the Genoa

I've been toying with the idea of something like that for Tuffy, so I can use different jibs without having to climb out on that tiny foredeck. One of my ideas is to use high-tech low-stretch line for the jib halyard, and the same line for a tack downhaul leading back to near the cockpit. The jibs would have wire of low-stretch line in their luffs. I've got a cute little bronze winch that could set the halyard, or downhaul, up tight enough so the whole works takes the strain off the headstay, acting as an "acting" headstay and, hopefully, keeping the jib luff tight enough. To change jibs, I'd slack the downhaul and halyard, pull the sail back to the cockpit, and swap sails. When I go get Tuffy's mainsail back from Kendall I should ask him of I'm crazy. <g>

But this year I'll just try to be happy with the little jib, and the newly loose-footed mainsail. :o)

On 2/10/2021 3:18 PM, Jove wrote:
Hey John,
A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back stays.
It may have other names.
Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.
The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the other thread later.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I don't know whether it is horse sense or horse something else, but if they like it I know where there is a whole pile of it. (L. Francis Herreshoff to an editor when told that readers liked his "horse sense")
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Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

Andrew Linn
 

I was just about to ask if anyone heard from you after your trip.  Looking forward to your write up. 

On Feb 10, 2021 3:18 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
Hey John,
A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back stays.
It may have other names.
Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the other thread later.
-Jove

On Sun, Jan 31, 2021 at 2:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Here's an entertaining way to get a Big Picture of what the wind is doing:

https://earth.nullschool.net/

Solent stay?

On 1/30/2021 6:23 PM, Jove wrote:
> Yes, I am becoming quite familiar with this predicament. Northerly winds
> in the summer, Southerly in the winter, but winter winds are cold and
> the weather is often stormy.
> I went around the whole trailerable/non-trailerable boat thing for a
> while, and at this point I want to try out the bigger boat stuff for a
> chapter.
> Hawaii sounds ok.
> We'll see how it goes.
> I'm also realizing that the daily sea winds in the strait of Juan de
> fuca can be a pretty good challenge. "wind river" was mentioned on this
> mailing list recently.
> Beating to windward is where I'll really need a smaller tighter
> headsail, and that idea of a solent stay will probably be the answer to
> that.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the
absence of power. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


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Re: Jove got a bigger boat.

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Hey John,
A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back stays.
It may have other names.
Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the other thread later.
-Jove

On Sun, Jan 31, 2021 at 2:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Here's an entertaining way to get a Big Picture of what the wind is doing:

https://earth.nullschool.net/

Solent stay?

On 1/30/2021 6:23 PM, Jove wrote:
> Yes, I am becoming quite familiar with this predicament. Northerly winds
> in the summer, Southerly in the winter, but winter winds are cold and
> the weather is often stormy.
> I went around the whole trailerable/non-trailerable boat thing for a
> while, and at this point I want to try out the bigger boat stuff for a
> chapter.
> Hawaii sounds ok.
> We'll see how it goes.
> I'm also realizing that the daily sea winds in the strait of Juan de
> fuca can be a pretty good challenge. "wind river" was mentioned on this
> mailing list recently.
> Beating to windward is where I'll really need a smaller tighter
> headsail, and that idea of a solent stay will probably be the answer to
> that.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the
absence of power. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


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Re: Worldwide Classic Boat Show -- We're Invited

Jamie Orr
 

No, Wayward Lass has never been in the show, I just sailed her over for transport - cheaper than the ferry and more fun!

I got the same pic you did, you may just have been lucky, being visible from the shore.


Re: Worldwide Classic Boat Show -- We're Invited

 

Did they put Wayward Lass in the sample boat show page they sent you? <g> Smart marketing...

On 2/6/2021 9:05 PM, Jamie wrote:
Yeah, got one for the Montague Harbour rendezvous too.
I guess that's at least two tickets they'll sell, John!
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Dealing with network executives is like being nibbled to death by ducks. (Eric Sevareid)
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Re: Fern Ridge Dam Closing Ceremony, Saturday, the 6th

elaineginader
 

I'm glad the day went well and hopefully the gods will be pleased. I did my dance to them while on Belle. Found some small tasks that needs to be addressed when it gets warmer and dry for a bit. I had water to do my gift to the gods. I hope they don't mind. I'm also going to be taking measurements for a couple canvas projects. Maybe I'll show the group my progress on making a few things as Almostcanada Dan does.
By the way my cars fixed with a lot of help from my husband Gary. Sure makes getting around easier.

Take care and be safe, Elaine


On Sat, Feb 6, 2021, 3:57 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Too bad you couldn't make it, Elaine. We had a good turnout, Fern Ridge
sailors and a few Coots. The ceremony went well enough, I think.
Somebody who had a slip at Orchard Point last year opened the gate so we
could get down on the docks and spread out. I sacrificed some Dos Equis*
to some rain gods, and people poured water into the lake to prime it.
Then we had a good BS session. :o) pardon the poor pictures -- people
were spread out.

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmU8LHS7

I sure hope the ceremony worked. It'll sure feel good to have a nice
long sailing season on the lake.

*The Dos Equis had been sitting at the back of my refrigerator for a
couple of _decades_, at least. The aging did it good; it was delicious!
:o) Does require some patience, though. <g>

On 2/5/2021 7:10 PM, elaine wrote:
> Can't make it my car is dead. Suspect I need new spark plugs (sigh).
> I'll dance and wear a crazy hat while I empty Bells bilge  ha ha.
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Adults are obsolete children, and the hell with them. (Theodore "Dr.
Seuss" Geisel)


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Re: Worldwide Classic Boat Show -- We're Invited

Jamie Orr
 

Yeah, got one for the Montague Harbour rendezvous too.

I guess that's at least two tickets they'll sell, John!

Jamie


Re: Victory

 

They named a building at the North Bend air station for Tom McAdams. They should name a lifeboat station, or maybe the Cape D coxswain school, after him:

https://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2012/07/the-champion-lifesaver-of-the-pacific-coast/

The last time he mentioned it, Toledo Joe said the book should be ready for publication this summer. I'm sure it'll be an entertaining book, but the way Tom McAdams tells a story in person probably won't translate well to the written page. He's stopped by the campfire at the Toledo Wooden Boat Show a few times, and we really enjoy his story telling. He can pull you into a story until you're on the edge of your seat, and then spring the punch line. :o) A master of the craft. Here's a bit of "oral history":

https://www.44mlb.com/crew-talk/tom-mc-adams-interview-page-1.html

On 2/6/2021 9:07 AM, Brandon F wrote:
I'll buy that book about Tom. He moored his boat a few slips down from Oceanus when we were rebuilding her in Newport. He is a great guy. He helped a lot with figuring things out. He offered to swing my compass, but I didn't take him up on it. I regret not taking him up on it. It would be something to tell my grandkids about. He is a great story teller and his stories have the added benefit of being true. Virginia and I ate a lot of black rockfish and ling that Tom caught. He loved fishing, but his wife would not cook what he caught. We were often the bene-fish-iaries. He has a CG airstation named after him. Right John?
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I like these cold, gray winter days. Days like these let you savor a bad mood. (Bill Watterson)
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