Date   

Re: Fern Ridge Dam Closing Ceremony, Saturday, the 6th

 

Too bad you couldn't make it, Elaine. We had a good turnout, Fern Ridge sailors and a few Coots. The ceremony went well enough, I think. Somebody who had a slip at Orchard Point last year opened the gate so we could get down on the docks and spread out. I sacrificed some Dos Equis* to some rain gods, and people poured water into the lake to prime it. Then we had a good BS session. :o) pardon the poor pictures -- people were spread out.

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmU8LHS7

I sure hope the ceremony worked. It'll sure feel good to have a nice long sailing season on the lake.

*The Dos Equis had been sitting at the back of my refrigerator for a couple of _decades_, at least. The aging did it good; it was delicious! :o) Does require some patience, though. <g>

On 2/5/2021 7:10 PM, elaine wrote:
Can't make it my car is dead. Suspect I need new spark plugs (sigh). I'll dance and wear a crazy hat while I empty Bells bilge  ha ha.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Adults are obsolete children, and the hell with them. (Theodore "Dr. Seuss" Geisel)
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Worldwide Classic Boat Show -- We're Invited

 

Got an interesting email yesterday. Might be worth participating. I'll know more next week. But they sure know how to get my attention. Look who's right in front on their sample page! :o) (see attachment)

"I wanted to let you know that we'll be featuring Oregon Coots at the Worldwide Classic Boat Show - online from February 19th-28th.

"We have created an entire page for Oregon Coots, using the information we could find online, and we expect thousands of people will see it over the course of the Show.

"There is no fee for being featured at the show - we're simply trying to utilize our extensive global reach here at Off Center Harbor to provide a boost to the field of classic & wooden boats while so many organizations are struggling during the pandemic. Tickets to the show are just $5."

https://www.offcenterharbor.com/2020/09/18/worldwide-classic-boat-show-announcement/

"Thanks,
Ben, Maynard, Bill, Eric, and Steve
Co-founders, Off Center Harbor and the Worldwide Classic Boat Show"

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Curiosity is insubordination in its purest form. (Vladimir Nabokov)



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Re: Victory

Brandon
 

I'll buy that book about Tom. He moored his boat a few slips down from Oceanus when we were rebuilding her in Newport. He is a great guy. He helped a lot with figuring things out. He offered to swing my compass, but I didn't take him up on it. I regret not taking him up on it. It would be something to tell my grandkids about. He is a great story teller and his stories have the added benefit of being true. Virginia and I ate a lot of black rockfish and ling that Tom caught. He loved fishing, but his wife would not cook what he caught. We were often the bene-fish-iaries. He has a CG airstation named after him. Right John?

Brandon


Re: Fern Ridge Dam Closing Ceremony, Saturday, the 6th

elaineginader
 

Can't make it my car is dead. Suspect I need new spark plugs (sigh). I'll dance and wear a crazy hat while I empty Bells bilge  ha ha.


On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 1:53 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
The Corps didn't put the plug all the way in on the first, but they've
kept the outflow low, and it looks like they _might_ let us have a bit
of a head start on filling the lake:

https://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf

But what we need most is plenty of rain from now through spring. So
please join us on the docks at Orchard Point tomorrow at 1:00 to appease
the rain gods and make them want to fill the lake for us.

Bring lunch and sacrifices to the gods, Libations will do. Silly hats
can only help our cause.


On 2/1/2021 1:05 PM, I wrote:
> The Corps of Engineers is supposed to put the plug back in at Fern Ridge
> today. Their reservoir Web pages are down, so I can't check on them...
> <sigh> I suppose I could drive by and look. <g>
>
> http://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf
>
> To ensure that we get enough rain this late winter and spring to fill
> Fern Ridge let's meet at Orchard Point Park (ignore the Coot Calendar --
> parking is easier at Orchard Point) at 1:00 Saturday to offer sacrifices
> to the rain gods and dance naked, or in weather appropriate clothing, on
> the docks at the launch ramp. Be prepared for social distancing and mask
> wearing. Bring lunch and something to sacrifice to the gods. In the
> past, people have brought samples of water from adventures on far
> waters, but I think the gods will be happy with libations.
>
> We didn't have a dam closing ceremony last year and look what happened!!
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
No, no, you're not thinking, you're just being logical. (Niels Bohr)


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Re: Fern Ridge Dam Closing Ceremony, Saturday, the 6th

 

The Corps didn't put the plug all the way in on the first, but they've kept the outflow low, and it looks like they _might_ let us have a bit of a head start on filling the lake:

https://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf

But what we need most is plenty of rain from now through spring. So please join us on the docks at Orchard Point tomorrow at 1:00 to appease the rain gods and make them want to fill the lake for us.

Bring lunch and sacrifices to the gods, Libations will do. Silly hats can only help our cause.

On 2/1/2021 1:05 PM, I wrote:
The Corps of Engineers is supposed to put the plug back in at Fern Ridge today. Their reservoir Web pages are down, so I can't check on them... <sigh> I suppose I could drive by and look. <g>
http://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf
To ensure that we get enough rain this late winter and spring to fill Fern Ridge let's meet at Orchard Point Park (ignore the Coot Calendar --
parking is easier at Orchard Point) at 1:00 Saturday to offer sacrifices to the rain gods and dance naked, or in weather appropriate clothing, on the docks at the launch ramp. Be prepared for social distancing and mask wearing. Bring lunch and something to sacrifice to the gods. In the past, people have brought samples of water from adventures on far waters, but I think the gods will be happy with libations.
We didn't have a dam closing ceremony last year and look what happened!!
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
No, no, you're not thinking, you're just being logical. (Niels Bohr)
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Re: The CG 36 footer, Siuslaw harbor

 

American Motors (Nash, Rambler) was the only major post WW II US car manufacturer that didn't make a pickup. GM, Ford, Chrysler and Studebaker all did.

There's an old registration card in Ralph Criteser's boat, Beaver, that says she was powered by a Nash engine. It really wasn't _that_ long ago that people put car engines in their boats, cobbling together whatever "marinization" needed on their own. It wasn't that long ago because I can remember overhearing some fishermen debating the merits of different auto engines the first time I went to Moe's, and I'm not old. <g>

Beaver's got a Chrysler Crown in her now. Based on a Chrysler road engine, but built at the factory for use in boats.

https://flic.kr/p/fE6M9s

https://flic.kr/p/fE71Hq

On 2/4/2021 4:21 PM, dan m wrote:
Jove-my best guess re the story is the summer of 1972.  And, a very important point, a Rambler was a passenger car. ...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Every generation revolts against its fathers and makes friends with its grandfathers. (Lewis Mumford)
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Re: Victory

 

No apology needed, Bob. I hope you'll forgive me for my too subtle, and unsuccessful, attempt at humor. ;o)

One of the stories Mac McAdams likes to tell, and he likes to tell stories!, <g> is about taking Victory into the surf on the north side of the north jetty at the mouth of Yaquina Bay. He very nearly "grounded" Victory, but succeeded in the rescue. He could be telling that story in the attached photo (he's thew short guy), or a tale of some other adventure. Mac not only likes to tell sea stories, he's very good at it. :o)

I'm eagerly awaiting publication of the book Toledo Joe is writing with Mac McAdams. The title will be something like Master Chief Thomas "Mac" McAdams, in His Own Words.

On 2/4/2021 2:32 PM, Bob Miller wrote:
The same applies to docked. I had a navy friend who would use it with his kids periodically.
As a retired Coastie, I still twitch when hearing the word grounded used in the same sentence with boat. Eons ago I had operational responsibility for search and rescue for all of Southeast New England (Cape Cod, Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard, all of Rhode Island including Block Island, and points in between). I supervised 10 SAR stations (including 13 41' UTBs, 11 44' MLBs, as well as 3 82' WPBs and 1 95' WPB). "Grounded" was a fraught word when referring to anything afloat, ours or civilian. Forgive my knee-jerk reaction.

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Self respect: the secure feeling that no one, as yet, is suspicious. (H. L. Mencken)
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Re: Good Read on Orcas

 

Thanks, Case. Good article about the two killer whale cultures.

On 2/4/2021 7:00 AM, Case wrote:
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/01/orcas-killer-whale-resident-transient/617862/?utm_source=pocket-newtab
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A man who is "ill-adjusted" to the world is always on the verge of finding himself. One who is adjusted to the world never finds himself, but gets to be a cabinet minister. (Hermann Hesse)
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Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Case Turner
 

A couple of things on the safety side. When I did boat deliveries I always took along a few extra items. 

1. Waterproof (dry bag) ditch bag which i’d put the following items  in 

a. Handheld vhf
b. Handheld gps
c. Cell phone
d. Flares and sound signaling device
e. Glow sticks
f. Bottle of water
g. Compass
h. Personal identification 

Make sure the bag can be tethered to you. Most dry bags can float when closed.

2. Paper charts - not optional 

3. Survival suit with attached light.

This was before individual EPIRB or Spot like devices. But we always made sure the boat we were delivering us an active registered EPIRB. 

We also required that the boat have a life raft. 

You mention life jackets make sure they are offshore rated and that they all have working lights. 

I probably missed some items we’d take but this is a good start and I wouldn’t do a delivery with any or these items.

Case

Sent from not here

On Feb 5, 2021, at 6:18 AM, Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts@...> wrote:


Jove, I'm sure you'll get plenty of suggestions. The Waggoner Guide is a great place to start. 

I'd suggest Port Madison as your first anchorage overnight. It's quiet at this time of year. You'll find good anchorage when you go in past the second yacht club piers on the south shore. You should find this location to be safe and out of any minor traffic passing through the area

47-41.49 N
122-32-13 W

I used Navionics in and out of Port Madison for five years 2015-2020 when my boat was berthed there, and always found it very accurate. (I use it on my IPAD-4, so the screen will be a bit bigger than a phone). I used to moor my boat (5 foot draft) at the "T" pier just west of Treasure Island, which is the island immediately north of the location I suggested above. Even at the lowest tides, minus 3(!) I had room under the boat.   

Entry Port Madison is easy; it's on a south leg, with good water on both sides. Your Navionics will show you the mudflats on either side. I always stayed in the deepest part shown; never saw less than 15 feet.  

The next leg is to the southwest, with plenty of good water to the south as you pass the Seattle Yacht Club outstation (the first of the two yacht club moorages on the south side with good water right up to the piers). Mind the mooring balls all over the place; you may find you'll have to work your way through a couple of them in the fairway. Stay a little south of the southwest leg if you have to, you'll find good water there. 

The next leg is more to the west southwest as you pass the Bainbridge Yacht Club piers and enter the area I'd suggest you consider for anchorage. 

You should find this location to be safe and out of any minor traffic passing through the area

47-41.49 N
122-32-13 W  

If you need to get ashore, there is an unmarked public access point just east of that "T" pier at the end of Skogen Lane at 47-41 54.36 N ,  122 32 12.42 W. On google maps, you will see a small skiff laying on the mud flat just offshore in that location. Note the daymark between the skiff's location and the suggested anchorage, which marks a big rock. 

There are no public landings, bathrooms or facilities in Port Madison that I know of, but it is quiet and I doubt you'll be disturbed in any safe anchorage. 

I have used this tide and current predictor for the past seven years and found it generally accurate for the area on the west side of the Sound from Port Townsend to Gig Harbor. Pay attention to the extensive mudflats on the west and north side of the dogleg as you enter, as well as cross-currents

This is the Port Madison page; these are highs and lows (I stripped out sunrise and other similar data) (use at your own risk of course). With the lower of the two lows in the minus range, you'll still find good holding ground in the area I suggested. And, you'll find that even in high winds, Port Madison is extremely well protected.     
021-02-07  02:52 PST  10.41 feet  High Tide
2021-02-07  07:11 PST   8.19 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-07  12:18 PST  11.11 feet  High Tide
2021-02-07  19:33 PST  -1.02 feet  Low Tide

2021-02-08  03:54 PST  11.33 feet  High Tide
2021-02-08  08:37 PST   8.09 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-08  13:20 PST  10.89 feet  High Tide
2021-02-08  20:27 PST  -1.50 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-09  04:39 PST  11.93 feet  High Tide
2021-02-09  09:38 PST   7.63 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-09  14:21 PST  10.78 feet  High Tide
2021-02-09  21:16 PST  -1.73 feet  Low Tide

2021-02-10  05:17 PST  12.24 feet  High Tide
2021-02-10  10:26 PST   7.05 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-10  15:17 PST  10.73 feet  High Tide
2021-02-10  22:02 PST  -1.69 feet  Low Tide 
Shipping: I use the Marine Radar app on my phone to monitor shipping, and have found it accurate. 
Pay attention to shipping if you pass anywhere near Point No Point; the container and bulk transport ships drag big wakes (VERY big wakes) and the rapidly shoaling water as you approach the point means that the wake can build up to surprising heights in a very short period of time. In fact, I'd wait north of Point No Point to let a big guy pass and to let the wake, which you can easily see), pass you. Avoid Point No Point at periods of highest currents, as the rip just off the point is extensive.      

Look at your charts carefully as you pass south of Point No Point, as rips form along the shoaling water. They're marked on the chart. Kingston is said to be good once inside the breakwater, but that's a ferry landing and noisy, and the anchorage just south of the breakwater is pretty rough.  I use the Washington Department of Transportation ferry schedules to stay out of the way of the Kingston-Edmonds ferry (which run at 18-22 knots) but have not found their wake excessive. This is the Kingston-Edmonds schedule

Port Madison Bay can be bumpy, as it is open to the southeast and north west. I've seen boats anchored off Indianola in the northwest corner, but haven't done so myself. You may find some small craft traffic while you head over towards Port Madison harbor, they're coming or going towards Agate Pass on the southwest end of the big bay.  

Tacoma is a major port, so you'll find shipping traffic all the way down there. I like to transit west of Vashon despite the current (no traffic except an occasional tug and barge). 

Best wishes for a safe and enjoyable passage!  

Pete Leenhouts
Port Ludlow WA
MV RIPTIDE 

      




-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 4, 2021 6:11 pm
Subject: [oregoncoots] Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers. 

WEATHER
Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium winds and light rain.

BOAT and CREW.
Boat has good plotter, diesel engine in good order with a 3 blade prop, diesel heater. Galley, head, etc.
I have myself and 2 crew, one more experienced than me has owned boats, and one less, has sailed fernridge racing with me on a friend's 28 for a season.

DAYS and LOCATIONS
Planning around 30 miles per day. Leaving in the morning just before low tide to flood our way south. The low slack at the tacoma narrows is 10.30 AM on Tuesday, which should make that easy and the rising tide can push us down into Olympia. Advice welcomed on that.
Obviously I don't want to go through with much head current, but I wonder... is a current flow with me to be avoided also?.... I was thinking within an hour of low slack would be best.

Planning 2 anchored or docked overnights,
1st night:
Pord madison north bainbridge
or
Eagle harbour, Winslow on bainbridge

2nd night,
Gig harbour
OR,
breakwater marina near tacoma.

An alternate plan would be to get through the narrows in the afternoon on the second day and overnight at a marina after the narrows like "narrows marina" etc. Or anchor out in a bay round the corner. There is a slack at 2pm Monday.

MAPS
I've got a decent electronic chart plotter on the boat, and I've got Navionics on my phone.
and I'm using "openCPN" on the PC to plan the route. Images below.
I'm using "deep zoom.com" to check tidal currents at various times and places.
I have books "cruising guide to the puget sound" and "tidal currents of puget sound"

Any reason not to go west of Vashon Island?

OTHER
I have US boat tow if I need it, and insurance, life jackets, flares and so forth.
Also wet weather gear.

All ideas, tips and alternatives welcomed.
Thanks,
Jove

<image.png>

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<image.png>

<image.png>

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<image.png>
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Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Dan
 

My experience in boats of your description and Puget Sound in winter is
long ago, and far away now. But, I agree. A tight schedule can really be
the biggest problem. That's when we do things that we shouldn't do.
Anyhow. The Tacoma Narrows can be a gnarly place to be in a
blow-against-the-tide. My personal favorite in the mid-south PS area is
Quartermaster Hbr on the bottom of Vashon. I used to "sail" year round on
the saltchuck; it involved a great deal of motoring with a steady drip from
the backstay to my coat collar. Have a great trip. Dan


Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Brandon
 

Jove,

Just a suggestion on the second night. Unless you like crowded Gig Harbor or have a reason to go there, you might think about Quartermaster harbor on Vashon, very snug with a nice state parks moorage or a little maina at Burton. Des Moines marina has very nice transient moorage, a fuel dock and an Anthony's restaurant. 

I wish I had some advice on the narrows, but I always get it wrong, but I always make it through anyway. If you do make it through on the second day, pick up a mooring ball at Eagle island. The Narrows marina is kinda out of your way. Watch out for the rock reef west of Eagle island as you head to Olympia.

Bon Voyage

Brandon
SV Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43
Olympia 


Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Pete Leenhouts
 

Jove, I'm sure you'll get plenty of suggestions. The Waggoner Guide is a great place to start. 

I'd suggest Port Madison as your first anchorage overnight. It's quiet at this time of year. You'll find good anchorage when you go in past the second yacht club piers on the south shore. You should find this location to be safe and out of any minor traffic passing through the area

47-41.49 N
122-32-13 W

I used Navionics in and out of Port Madison for five years 2015-2020 when my boat was berthed there, and always found it very accurate. (I use it on my IPAD-4, so the screen will be a bit bigger than a phone). I used to moor my boat (5 foot draft) at the "T" pier just west of Treasure Island, which is the island immediately north of the location I suggested above. Even at the lowest tides, minus 3(!) I had room under the boat.   

Entry Port Madison is easy; it's on a south leg, with good water on both sides. Your Navionics will show you the mudflats on either side. I always stayed in the deepest part shown; never saw less than 15 feet.  

The next leg is to the southwest, with plenty of good water to the south as you pass the Seattle Yacht Club outstation (the first of the two yacht club moorages on the south side with good water right up to the piers). Mind the mooring balls all over the place; you may find you'll have to work your way through a couple of them in the fairway. Stay a little south of the southwest leg if you have to, you'll find good water there. 

The next leg is more to the west southwest as you pass the Bainbridge Yacht Club piers and enter the area I'd suggest you consider for anchorage. 

You should find this location to be safe and out of any minor traffic passing through the area

47-41.49 N
122-32-13 W  

If you need to get ashore, there is an unmarked public access point just east of that "T" pier at the end of Skogen Lane at 47-41 54.36 N ,  122 32 12.42 W. On google maps, you will see a small skiff laying on the mud flat just offshore in that location. Note the daymark between the skiff's location and the suggested anchorage, which marks a big rock. 

There are no public landings, bathrooms or facilities in Port Madison that I know of, but it is quiet and I doubt you'll be disturbed in any safe anchorage. 

I have used this tide and current predictor for the past seven years and found it generally accurate for the area on the west side of the Sound from Port Townsend to Gig Harbor. Pay attention to the extensive mudflats on the west and north side of the dogleg as you enter, as well as cross-currents

This is the Port Madison page; these are highs and lows (I stripped out sunrise and other similar data) (use at your own risk of course). With the lower of the two lows in the minus range, you'll still find good holding ground in the area I suggested. And, you'll find that even in high winds, Port Madison is extremely well protected.     
021-02-07  02:52 PST  10.41 feet  High Tide
2021-02-07  07:11 PST   8.19 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-07  12:18 PST  11.11 feet  High Tide
2021-02-07  19:33 PST  -1.02 feet  Low Tide

2021-02-08  03:54 PST  11.33 feet  High Tide
2021-02-08  08:37 PST   8.09 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-08  13:20 PST  10.89 feet  High Tide
2021-02-08  20:27 PST  -1.50 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-09  04:39 PST  11.93 feet  High Tide
2021-02-09  09:38 PST   7.63 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-09  14:21 PST  10.78 feet  High Tide
2021-02-09  21:16 PST  -1.73 feet  Low Tide

2021-02-10  05:17 PST  12.24 feet  High Tide
2021-02-10  10:26 PST   7.05 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-10  15:17 PST  10.73 feet  High Tide
2021-02-10  22:02 PST  -1.69 feet  Low Tide 
Shipping: I use the Marine Radar app on my phone to monitor shipping, and have found it accurate. 
Pay attention to shipping if you pass anywhere near Point No Point; the container and bulk transport ships drag big wakes (VERY big wakes) and the rapidly shoaling water as you approach the point means that the wake can build up to surprising heights in a very short period of time. In fact, I'd wait north of Point No Point to let a big guy pass and to let the wake, which you can easily see), pass you. Avoid Point No Point at periods of highest currents, as the rip just off the point is extensive.      

Look at your charts carefully as you pass south of Point No Point, as rips form along the shoaling water. They're marked on the chart. Kingston is said to be good once inside the breakwater, but that's a ferry landing and noisy, and the anchorage just south of the breakwater is pretty rough.  I use the Washington Department of Transportation ferry schedules to stay out of the way of the Kingston-Edmonds ferry (which run at 18-22 knots) but have not found their wake excessive. This is the Kingston-Edmonds schedule

Port Madison Bay can be bumpy, as it is open to the southeast and north west. I've seen boats anchored off Indianola in the northwest corner, but haven't done so myself. You may find some small craft traffic while you head over towards Port Madison harbor, they're coming or going towards Agate Pass on the southwest end of the big bay.  

Tacoma is a major port, so you'll find shipping traffic all the way down there. I like to transit west of Vashon despite the current (no traffic except an occasional tug and barge). 

Best wishes for a safe and enjoyable passage!  

Pete Leenhouts
Port Ludlow WA
MV RIPTIDE 

      




-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 4, 2021 6:11 pm
Subject: [oregoncoots] Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers. 

WEATHER
Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium winds and light rain.

BOAT and CREW.
Boat has good plotter, diesel engine in good order with a 3 blade prop, diesel heater. Galley, head, etc.
I have myself and 2 crew, one more experienced than me has owned boats, and one less, has sailed fernridge racing with me on a friend's 28 for a season.

DAYS and LOCATIONS
Planning around 30 miles per day. Leaving in the morning just before low tide to flood our way south. The low slack at the tacoma narrows is 10.30 AM on Tuesday, which should make that easy and the rising tide can push us down into Olympia. Advice welcomed on that.
Obviously I don't want to go through with much head current, but I wonder... is a current flow with me to be avoided also?.... I was thinking within an hour of low slack would be best.

Planning 2 anchored or docked overnights,
1st night:
Pord madison north bainbridge
or
Eagle harbour, Winslow on bainbridge

2nd night,
Gig harbour
OR,
breakwater marina near tacoma.

An alternate plan would be to get through the narrows in the afternoon on the second day and overnight at a marina after the narrows like "narrows marina" etc. Or anchor out in a bay round the corner. There is a slack at 2pm Monday.

MAPS
I've got a decent electronic chart plotter on the boat, and I've got Navionics on my phone.
and I'm using "openCPN" on the PC to plan the route. Images below.
I'm using "deep zoom.com" to check tidal currents at various times and places.
I have books "cruising guide to the puget sound" and "tidal currents of puget sound"

Any reason not to go west of Vashon Island?

OTHER
I have US boat tow if I need it, and insurance, life jackets, flares and so forth.
Also wet weather gear.

All ideas, tips and alternatives welcomed.
Thanks,
Jove

image.png
image.png
image.png
image.png
image.png


Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

 

On the Salish 100, Marty told us that the current in Colvos Passage always flows north, no matter what the stage of the tide. As Billy Holiday just sang to me, it's "funny that way". <g>

Now the stars are falling on Alabama... Glad I'm here in Oregon.

On February 4, 2021 6:11:58 PM PST, Jove wrote:
Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers.
...

Any reason not to go west of Vashon Island?
...
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Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks for the tips Andrew, I'll give you call tomorrow and pick your brain.
Is there any time that works best for you?

30 miles a day is just to avoid sailing at night, and to keep the trip interesting and mellow.
I don't want to push my luck with a new boat and new crew.
But I'm open to changing my ideas about all of it. The more advice the better.
I was hoping to have a nice clear weather window Fri-Monday, but it shifted on me. So we'll see.
-Jove


On Thu, Feb 4, 2021 at 8:46 PM Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:
Greg and I did most of that run backwards - I mean the other way - back
in 2012. We went from Tacoma up around point. We motored almost all the
way, maintaining speed pretty easy. There was very little wind on our trip.

30 miles a day? I hope you are planning on not turning on the engine
unless you are about to run aground. With a crew of 3, and motoring at
an average of 4kts, you should be able to do the whole trip in 24 hours.
30 miles a day? You can do that in a PDR.  It ain't fun, but . . .

If you do get to moving faster than you planned for, I hope you spend
the extra time sailing. Gunkhole and take all the alternative routes you
can - anyone can sail the ship channel. Do a few man overboard drills.
Time on the water is worth it's weight in gold.*

http://andrewlinn.com/2012/120830_boatmove/index.htm

*I'm working on mixing my metaphors.

On 2/4/2021 6:11 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
> Hey guys,
> I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
> I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers.
>
> WEATHER
> Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to
> move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
> Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
> Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium
> winds and light rain.
>
>







Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Andrew Linn
 

Greg and I did most of that run backwards - I mean the other way - back in 2012. We went from Tacoma up around point. We motored almost all the way, maintaining speed pretty easy. There was very little wind on our trip.

30 miles a day? I hope you are planning on not turning on the engine unless you are about to run aground. With a crew of 3, and motoring at an average of 4kts, you should be able to do the whole trip in 24 hours. 30 miles a day? You can do that in a PDR.  It ain't fun, but . . .

If you do get to moving faster than you planned for, I hope you spend the extra time sailing. Gunkhole and take all the alternative routes you can - anyone can sail the ship channel. Do a few man overboard drills. Time on the water is worth it's weight in gold.*

http://andrewlinn.com/2012/120830_boatmove/index.htm

*I'm working on mixing my metaphors.

On 2/4/2021 6:11 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers.

WEATHER
Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium winds and light rain.


Re: Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Jamie Orr
 

Hi Jove,

I don't know Tacoma Narrows, but we have a few narrows up here in BC, for example Seymour Narrows near Campbell River.  What I have been told, and what I did, was to start through near the end of the unfavourable tide.  The slight current against you will give you more steerage while your speed over ground is less, so you have better control.  Once through, the now favourable current will speed you on your way, and incidentally make sure you don't get swept through backwards should you lose power after the change.

If you are going south, I imagine the tide will ebb north, so I would start through in the last few minutes of the ebb.  Once through, the new flood should then help you in travelling south.

I make no claim to being expert, so run that past someone who has traversed Tacoma Narrows, and/or consult your Waggoner cruising guide - they put in lots of good tips.

Cheers,

Jamie


Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers. 

WEATHER
Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium winds and light rain.

BOAT and CREW.
Boat has good plotter, diesel engine in good order with a 3 blade prop, diesel heater. Galley, head, etc.
I have myself and 2 crew, one more experienced than me has owned boats, and one less, has sailed fernridge racing with me on a friend's 28 for a season.

DAYS and LOCATIONS
Planning around 30 miles per day. Leaving in the morning just before low tide to flood our way south. The low slack at the tacoma narrows is 10.30 AM on Tuesday, which should make that easy and the rising tide can push us down into Olympia. Advice welcomed on that.
Obviously I don't want to go through with much head current, but I wonder... is a current flow with me to be avoided also?.... I was thinking within an hour of low slack would be best.

Planning 2 anchored or docked overnights,
1st night:
Pord madison north bainbridge
or
Eagle harbour, Winslow on bainbridge

2nd night,
Gig harbour
OR,
breakwater marina near tacoma.

An alternate plan would be to get through the narrows in the afternoon on the second day and overnight at a marina after the narrows like "narrows marina" etc. Or anchor out in a bay round the corner. There is a slack at 2pm Monday.

MAPS
I've got a decent electronic chart plotter on the boat, and I've got Navionics on my phone.
and I'm using "openCPN" on the PC to plan the route. Images below.
I'm using "deep zoom.com" to check tidal currents at various times and places.
I have books "cruising guide to the puget sound" and "tidal currents of puget sound"

Any reason not to go west of Vashon Island?

OTHER
I have US boat tow if I need it, and insurance, life jackets, flares and so forth.
Also wet weather gear.

All ideas, tips and alternatives welcomed.
Thanks,
Jove

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Re: The CG 36 footer, Siuslaw harbor

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Sweet little sailboat what's the length/beam on that. What is the keel configuration?
Gay deciever is a great name, wouldn't get away with it these days.
Nice chain plates too.
-Jove


On Thu, Feb 4, 2021 at 4:21 PM dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:
Jove-my best guess re the story is the summer of 1972.  And, a very important point, a Rambler was a passenger car.     Here's another picture of the ways, 1964 or 65. I'm the kid with his hand on the post.   This is/was the sailboat we had, built in Portland in 1939.   Original name:  "Gay Deceiver".   I'll send John Acord info about the Willys, don't want to get into trouble with the moderator for being off the topic, because the penalties are severe.

Dan






Re: The CG 36 footer, Siuslaw harbor

dan mulholland
 

Jove-my best guess re the story is the summer of 1972.  And, a very important point, a Rambler was a passenger car.     Here's another picture of the ways, 1964 or 65. I'm the kid with his hand on the post.   This is/was the sailboat we had, built in Portland in 1939.   Original name:  "Gay Deceiver".   I'll send John Acord info about the Willys, don't want to get into trouble with the moderator for being off the topic, because the penalties are severe.

Dan






Re: The CG 36 footer, Siuslaw harbor

 

The marine railway at Ralph Criteser's mooring is an interesting, homebuilt contraption. I was disappointed to see that the old car engine on the winch had been replaced with a Briggs and Stratton by the time of the last launch there. I think the last car engine was a British OHV four-cylinder, can't remember the make... The B&S didn't run very well. <g>

https://flic.kr/s/aHsm9UaEnk

Ralph's crane is an interesting contraption, too. The most interesting bits are underneath. I'll have to sneak in there in a boat and take some pictures before it's gone. But will I be able to get in there now that Ralph has stopped dredging a channel with Rex's propeller? ;o)

On 2/4/2021 9:44 AM, Jove wrote:
Thanks for sharing a great story Dan. Wish I could go back and watch.
You'd have to go to a 3rd world country now to see that kind of antics with an old pickup engine, but I"m sure they're doing it somewhere today.
Reminds me of my upbringing in Ireland, although I wasn't near the water unfortunately.
When did that story take place?
It's interesting how quickly we've moved away from home built machines, and become so regulated. Pros and cons to that of course.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The louder he talks of honour, the faster we count our spoons. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
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