Date   

Re: life cycle > Victory

 

The lifesaving part of the Coast Guard is what most of us think of when the service is mentioned, but they've been sucking the hind tit for a long time. The status, and chance for advancement, used to be in the big cutters, and maybe still is, but since 9/11, and being wrapped into the Dept. of Homeland Security, the gun-wielding parts of the CG have been getting more things to do, and more of the money -- and there's never enough money to do everything the CG is asked to do. <sigh>

If there aren't going to be replacements for the 52-footers anytime soon, it might make sense to take the four they've got out of service, one a time, for repowering and a major update of all the systems. But the hulls would still be 60+ years old. It'd probably be as expensive as building new boats, but there isn't a design for a replacement boat, and maybe money could be found from from a different pocket than the "new build" one. That's an old Navy trick, USN and RN, and why the 1850s sloop USS Constellation was thought for so long to be the frigate Constellation from the 1790s. The frigate was "rebuilt" in the '50s, but what really happened was a new sloop of war with the same name was built from scratch (sometimes some parts from the "rebuilt" ship were used in the new ship, but not always).

I toured a 47-footer at Depoe Bay a couple of times during the boat show, before 9/11. Both times they'd assigned the freshest caught, wettest behind the ears, young Coastie to guide the tours. Both times somebody asked the youngster if they were excited to be out saving lives and were they gonna go to the Coxswain School at Cape D. Both times the young Coastie (different one each time I did the tour) said they were just doing time at a lifeboat station until they could get into the law enforcement arm! <sigh>

On 2/4/2021 8:01 AM, Roger P wrote:

George,
That's the whole point. The generator was past the end of its life cycle, it would be far easier and less expensive to replace a generator than an engine, and they still didn't replace it.
...
All equipment used, where there are life safety issues, has a defined life cycle, and defined ways of checking to see if the equipment is past the end of its life cycle. The whole goal of those federal standards is to help people make plans and then replace the equipment BEFORE it fails.
Everything I've heard about the coast guard indicates the crews would be right on top of this, if given half a chance.
That means some grand poobah made a policy decision to not do required maintenance on these boats, and not decommission them.
Issues:
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A person without a sense of humor is like a wagon without springs. It's jolted by every pebble on the road. (Henry Ward Beecher)
--
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Re: life cycle > Victory

Randy Torgerson
 

I have already added MLB 52's to the list of boats I want when I grow up.   I think they would be a great boat to take to the Arcitc circle.

Randy


Re: Victory

Bob Miller
 

The same applies to docked. I had a navy friend who would use it with his kids periodically. 

As a retired Coastie, I still twitch when hearing the word grounded used in the same sentence with boat. Eons ago I had operational responsibility for search and rescue for all of Southeast New England (Cape Cod, Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard, all of Rhode Island including Block Island, and points in between). I supervised 10 SAR stations (including 13 41' UTBs, 11 44' MLBs, as well as 3 82' WPBs and 1 95' WPB). "Grounded" was a fraught word when referring to anything afloat, ours or civilian. Forgive my knee-jerk reaction.

Bob



Sender notified by
Mailtrack 02/04/21, 02:15:18 PM


On Thu, Feb 4, 2021 at 2:13 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I was thinking more of the kind of "grounded" where your mother tells
you to stay in your room and takes away your TV privileges. <g>

On 2/3/2021 3:13 PM, Bob Miller wrote:
> I believe the preferred nautical term is "docked" vs "grounded."
>
--
John <jkohnen@...>
The habit of reading is the only enjoyment in which there is no alloy;
it lasts when all other pleasures fade. (Anthony Trollope)


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Re: The CG 36 footer, Siuslaw harbor

 

Walt Fossick and some of the other Florence fishermen, when there were still some, kept the marine railway at Siuslaw Marina operating until maybe ten years ago. It was even more jackleg at the end than when you worked there. <g> When my friend, Dunaway, hauled his captain's gig there, I recall sitting in the shade next to the boat looking out on the sunny river, with healthy weeds in the water, ducks swimming by, and little baitfish playing near the rails, and thinking of all the boats that had been hauled there over the years to have their bottom paint scraped and sanded off and redone. <g> I don't recall if it was the difficulty of keeping the railway working, or the DEQ, that finally killed the marine railway. Last time I saw Otter hauled out it was at Winchester Bay.

Terry Lesh worked at Siuslaw Marina, repairing boats, when he lived over there.

On 2/3/2021 8:04 PM, dan m wrote:
A story, some of it must be true, forgive me if I've told this before.
In high school, and college, I worked summers at the Siuslaw Marina in Cushman, east of Florence.   At that time, the marina had a marine railway- the marina being formerly a CRPA cannery.   Being a teenager, I was free to launch boats, run the saws and the planer, pump gas, attempt boat repairs, sell worms, you name it.  Rules rarely enforced.    But, I never ran the ways.  It was kind of a scary setup, all open, not a safety feature in sight.  A chassis, or frame, on one end a rambler flathead six engine, with a lever attached to the clutch; you moved the tabs on the 3 speed,  formerly column shift, transmission, to go "in and out".  The copper fuel line went into the spout of a gas can.  At the other end of the chassis was a reel of wire rope, which went through a 90 degree turn at a block, and down to the carriage.  Engine spewed smoke when starting up.  The ways worked best for going on and off at high tide, slack.   There wasn't much for lights, but we'd acquired a few of the old lights from the football field we could plug in as needed.
I was left in charge of the place, at least once,  when "the boss", Floyd White, went commercial fishing in his all mahogany Owens cabin cruiser.  I don't know how anyone knew I was "in charge"; I just had the keys and knew where the cash was.
One night I got a call at home.   The coast guard was on the line.  That afternoon, they'd dropped the 36 footer's aft onto the north jetty. They had every pump on it, barely keeping it floating, at the station. Could I haul them out on the railway?  At high tide, 12:30 AM?   I don't know what I said to them, but I knew I'd have to figure out how to run the ways.  I set up at least one football light to see down the tracks.   I managed to get the engine started, and fooled around with the transmission tabs,  tested "in or out" with the clutch lever, and got the carriage in the water.   Once the crew had the boat on, I moved a transmission tab, who knows what comedy of things I tried, I didn't know anything- such as reverse and 1st gear being on one tab, and 2nd and 3rd on the other, things learned after I got a Willys wagon. Anyway, started it up, "let out" the clutch, and killed the engine,  but the cart was at least headed uphill.  Did that a few more times, and got the boat out of the water.
Later I figured out, or may have been told, that I'd pulled the boat out in 3rd gear, hence the need for all that clutch work.  And that's my experience with 36 foot double ended lifeboats.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
One cat just leads to another. (Ernest Hemingway)
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Re: Victory

 

I was thinking more of the kind of "grounded" where your mother tells you to stay in your room and takes away your TV privileges. <g>

On 2/3/2021 3:13 PM, Bob Miller wrote:
I believe the preferred nautical term is "docked" vs "grounded."
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The habit of reading is the only enjoyment in which there is no alloy; it lasts when all other pleasures fade. (Anthony Trollope)
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Sail boat Auction

Case Turner
 

There’s a sailboat in depoe bay that the Cuty has taken for past due montage. It’s going up for auction. Guess you can contact Depoe Bay City Hall for particulars. City has title, included sails, kicker and whatever’s on board.



Sent from not here

--
Dirt


Re: The CG 36 footer, Siuslaw harbor

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks for sharing a great story Dan. Wish I could go back and watch.
You'd have to go to a 3rd world country now to see that kind of antics with an old pickup engine, but I"m sure they're doing it somewhere today.
Reminds me of my upbringing in Ireland, although I wasn't near the water unfortunately.
When did that story take place?
It's interesting how quickly we've moved away from home built machines, and become so regulated. Pros and cons to that of course.
-Jove

On Thu, Feb 4, 2021 at 8:33 AM johnacord <jcacord@...> wrote:
On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 08:04 PM, dan mulholland wrote:

Dan,

A bit off topic about boating, but ........
.............things learned after I got a Willys wagon.  

Same one in the pictures of the planer?  How about some photos of it and a short narrative.

Sometimes missing the old cars of my youth  :-)
John Acord


Re: life cycle > Victory

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

I absolutely agree.
A failed generator is the type of excuse they give the public. and most people say "Oh, i guess it WAS at the end of it's life".
And maybe there are good reasons for it, and maybe there are bad reasons for it. But I agree with Rodger that someone changed a maintenance schedule somehow.
Perhaps the generator was not stand alone... maybe it was a large alternator on the main engine, I don't know much about the layout of this type of boat.

That 52 might make a someone good liveaboard when they sell the hull off at some point. :)
-Jove


On Thu, Feb 4, 2021 at 8:03 AM Roger Padvorac <roger@...> wrote:
George,
That's the whole point. The generator was past the end of its life cycle, it would be far easier and less expensive to replace a generator than an engine, and they still didn't replace it.
 
It gives me the heebie jeebies to think of being involved in a scenario like rescuing a boat drifting towards rocks, at night, in the rain, in heavy seas, and then suddenly loosing navigation, radar, and search lights.
 
When I said: Why don't they just replace the engines and steering gear?
 
I was meaning the critical equipment in those boats is fairly straightforward, and doesn't need to be custom manufactured like the exotic stuff in a cannery ship, destroyer, or oil tanker. You order the replacement equipment, remove the equipment past the end of its life cycle, and install the new equipment.
 
* * * *
All equipment used, where there are life safety issues, has a defined life cycle, and defined ways of checking to see if the equipment is past the end of its life cycle. The whole goal of those federal standards is to help people make plans and then replace the equipment BEFORE it fails.
 
Everything I've heard about the coast guard indicates the crews would be right on top of this, if given half a chance.
 
That means some grand poobah made a policy decision to not do required maintenance on these boats, and not decommission them.
 
Issues:
- That decision was a criminal disregard for human life.
- Shipping companies and cruise lines keep track of issues like this, and tend to avoid places with issues like this, which hurts our economy.
 
Does somebody know an investigative reporter, who might be interested in looking into this, and write up who made that decision, and who influenced them to do that?
 
Sincerely,
Roger
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2021 8:25 PM
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Victory

Roger,

The article that John linked in his original post gave the example of a failed generator resulting in losing the radar and navigation system during a rescue. Anyways, I'm sure there are much more systems on this boat then just the engine and steering.

George

On Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 8:00:46 PM PST, Roger Padvorac <roger@...> wrote:



I'm ignoring most email for the time being, but wondered at the size 
and subject of this one.

Previously I hadn't paid attention to the difference between the 52' 
and 47' boats.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/47-foot_Motor_Lifeboat
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/52-foot_Motor_Lifeboat

In short, the 47' boat is a wimp compared to the 52' boat.

You are right, they are amazing - the pictures in those Wikipedia 
articles says it all.

I'd be very surprised if this country builds a useful replacement for 
the 52' boats. The navy has a pretty poor track record for the last 
decade.

Every day I take a look at RT.com because its a reliable source of bad 
news that will affect my life (like efforts to cut Social Security). 
There are a surprising number of WA/OR articles there. I also read 
some of the compare and contrast opinion essays there.

Our culture has lost the competence of the mid 20th century - too many 
people stopped doing the hard thankless work of cultural stewardship 
and we've lost a lot of our cultural capital.

* * * *
The 47' boats started coming into service in 1997, and there are 227 
of them, so they will be around for a while.

You say the 52' boats are saved for the really difficult situations.

How often do the 47' boats turn out to be inadequate, and a 52' boat 
is used, and in what kinds of circumstances?

I've survived my adventures by paying attention to the fallback 
options, which is why I put some thought into this subject, once I 
took a look at it.

* * * *
After I thought a bit, I wondered, what do you mean by old?

Engines and steering gear can be rebuilt or replaced, and on a boat 
like this there isn't much else that is essential, expensive, and 
takes a lot of work to maintain.

Why don't they just replace the engines and steering gear?

Sincerely,
Roger

Quoting John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>:

> Victory's my favorite CG boat too, with the other steel 52-footers 
> close behind. But they're Old. It's getting so it's hard to keep 
> them going, so Victory sits idle, waiting to be used only when her 
> capabilities are _really_ needed. I'll miss the 52s when they're 
> gone, but their replacements should have been ready years ago. 
> <sigh> I hope when the replacements for the 52-footers are finally 
> developed and built that they perform as well in the really awful 
> stuff as Victory, but I'll bet they won't have as much class as she 
> has.
>
> On 2/1/2021 1:25 PM, Case wrote:
>> My favorite CG boat ever. Pretty amazing boat.
>>
>> I got to go for a short cruise on her across the bay once.
>>
>>> https://newportnewstimes.com/article/victory-the-queen-of-the-fleet
>
> --
> John <jkohnen@...>
> Laws are like cobwebs which may catch small flies, but let wasps and 
> hornets break through. (Jonathan Swift)
>
>
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> https://www.avg.com
>
>
>








Re: The CG 36 footer, Siuslaw harbor

johnacord
 

On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 08:04 PM, dan mulholland wrote:

Dan,

A bit off topic about boating, but ........
.............things learned after I got a Willys wagon.  

Same one in the pictures of the planer?  How about some photos of it and a short narrative.

Sometimes missing the old cars of my youth  :-)
John Acord


Re: life cycle > Victory

Roger Padvorac
 


George,
That's the whole point. The generator was past the end of its life cycle, it would be far easier and less expensive to replace a generator than an engine, and they still didn't replace it.
 
It gives me the heebie jeebies to think of being involved in a scenario like rescuing a boat drifting towards rocks, at night, in the rain, in heavy seas, and then suddenly loosing navigation, radar, and search lights.
 
When I said: Why don't they just replace the engines and steering gear?
 
I was meaning the critical equipment in those boats is fairly straightforward, and doesn't need to be custom manufactured like the exotic stuff in a cannery ship, destroyer, or oil tanker. You order the replacement equipment, remove the equipment past the end of its life cycle, and install the new equipment.
 
* * * *
All equipment used, where there are life safety issues, has a defined life cycle, and defined ways of checking to see if the equipment is past the end of its life cycle. The whole goal of those federal standards is to help people make plans and then replace the equipment BEFORE it fails.
 
Everything I've heard about the coast guard indicates the crews would be right on top of this, if given half a chance.
 
That means some grand poobah made a policy decision to not do required maintenance on these boats, and not decommission them.
 
Issues:
- That decision was a criminal disregard for human life.
- Shipping companies and cruise lines keep track of issues like this, and tend to avoid places with issues like this, which hurts our economy.
 
Does somebody know an investigative reporter, who might be interested in looking into this, and write up who made that decision, and who influenced them to do that?
 
Sincerely,
Roger
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2021 8:25 PM
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Victory

Roger,

The article that John linked in his original post gave the example of a failed generator resulting in losing the radar and navigation system during a rescue. Anyways, I'm sure there are much more systems on this boat then just the engine and steering.

George

On Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 8:00:46 PM PST, Roger Padvorac <roger@...> wrote:



I'm ignoring most email for the time being, but wondered at the size 
and subject of this one.

Previously I hadn't paid attention to the difference between the 52' 
and 47' boats.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/47-foot_Motor_Lifeboat
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/52-foot_Motor_Lifeboat

In short, the 47' boat is a wimp compared to the 52' boat.

You are right, they are amazing - the pictures in those Wikipedia 
articles says it all.

I'd be very surprised if this country builds a useful replacement for 
the 52' boats. The navy has a pretty poor track record for the last 
decade.

Every day I take a look at RT.com because its a reliable source of bad 
news that will affect my life (like efforts to cut Social Security). 
There are a surprising number of WA/OR articles there. I also read 
some of the compare and contrast opinion essays there.

Our culture has lost the competence of the mid 20th century - too many 
people stopped doing the hard thankless work of cultural stewardship 
and we've lost a lot of our cultural capital.

* * * *
The 47' boats started coming into service in 1997, and there are 227 
of them, so they will be around for a while.

You say the 52' boats are saved for the really difficult situations.

How often do the 47' boats turn out to be inadequate, and a 52' boat 
is used, and in what kinds of circumstances?

I've survived my adventures by paying attention to the fallback 
options, which is why I put some thought into this subject, once I 
took a look at it.

* * * *
After I thought a bit, I wondered, what do you mean by old?

Engines and steering gear can be rebuilt or replaced, and on a boat 
like this there isn't much else that is essential, expensive, and 
takes a lot of work to maintain.

Why don't they just replace the engines and steering gear?

Sincerely,
Roger

Quoting John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>:

> Victory's my favorite CG boat too, with the other steel 52-footers 
> close behind. But they're Old. It's getting so it's hard to keep 
> them going, so Victory sits idle, waiting to be used only when her 
> capabilities are _really_ needed. I'll miss the 52s when they're 
> gone, but their replacements should have been ready years ago. 
> <sigh> I hope when the replacements for the 52-footers are finally 
> developed and built that they perform as well in the really awful 
> stuff as Victory, but I'll bet they won't have as much class as she 
> has.
>
> On 2/1/2021 1:25 PM, Case wrote:
>> My favorite CG boat ever. Pretty amazing boat.
>>
>> I got to go for a short cruise on her across the bay once.
>>
>>> https://newportnewstimes.com/article/victory-the-queen-of-the-fleet
>
> --
> John <jkohnen@...>
> Laws are like cobwebs which may catch small flies, but let wasps and 
> hornets break through. (Jonathan Swift)
>
>
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> https://www.avg.com
>
>
>








Good Read on Orcas

Case Turner
 


Re: Shenadoah fabric covered boat build

cherrill boissonou
 

Nice project, Dan.....what are you using for a dehumidifier?
🧙‍♂️⚓️Earl


On Feb 3, 2021, at 6:37 PM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:

Everyone,

John asked for a report on this project.   I did send John a note about this, but my messages to him go into a bucket called "worse than spam" and he didn't get it.

I'm working on the parts, to create a boat kit, to take to Florence to assemble. The plans call for clear, 14' clear cedar for the stringers, keel, and rails.  I was lucky enough to have a friend in Portland that had 1X12's, 14' long,  which he contributed to the project. (He does know that he contributed...)

I borrowed a thickness planer to clean them up; it's hard to fit 1X12's in a 10" wide planer.


<IMG_0458.jpg>

There are areas of each board that are clear end to end, so I ripped and planed.

<IMG_0460.jpg>

It's nice to work with good material, smells good, too.

When done, there are a bunch of 3/4" thick pieces of various widths:

<IMG_0463.jpg>

Then there are the 2X4's for the oars-and, I hope to use this material for breast hooks, the one knee, and thwarts, perhaps.

<IMG_0467.jpg>

The fan and dehumidifier action have the boards at or very close to the expected moisture level of kiln dried material.  There are a couple of 2X6's as well.  There is some bug damage to work around.

The plans call for hardwood flooring, so to speak; had some white oak, shown in process below.

<IMG_0469.jpg>


One concern was how to install these floorboards.  The plan instructions said, kind of, to cut the holes for the floorboards after the frame is assembled.  But maybe not.  I looked at this for a while, and corresponded with the designer, who confessed that the description of how these went in was, well, not quite accurate...I'm learning that boat plans are more like recipes than Ikea assembly instructions.   Anyway, I set up the strongback, and clamped on the offending frames, cut the holes, and hope it will come together as appropriate.  Below is a picture with the strongback and 3 of the 5 frames.

<IMG_0474.jpg>

Next up are the oars.  Here's the package from down under, cut off a little, the bottom of the oarlocks and the sockets.  The blades are the key item.  The cedar shafts will have a fork, or slot, for the blade.


<IMG_0478.jpg>

So, getting closer to assembly.

Dan





























The CG 36 footer, Siuslaw harbor

dan mulholland
 

A story, some of it must be true, forgive me if I've told this before.

In high school, and college, I worked summers at the Siuslaw Marina in Cushman, east of Florence.   At that time, the marina had a marine railway- the marina being formerly a CRPA cannery.   Being a teenager, I was free to launch boats, run the saws and the planer, pump gas, attempt boat repairs, sell worms, you name it.  Rules rarely enforced.    But, I never ran the ways.  It was kind of a scary setup, all open, not a safety feature in sight.  A chassis, or frame, on one end a rambler flathead six engine,  with a lever attached to the clutch; you moved the tabs on the 3 speed,  formerly column shift, transmission, to go "in and out".  The copper fuel line went into the spout of a gas can.  At the other end of the chassis was a reel of wire rope, which went through a 90 degree turn at a block, and down to the carriage.  Engine spewed smoke when starting up.  The ways worked best for going on and off at high tide, slack.   There wasn't much for lights, but we'd acquired a few of the old lights from the football field we could plug in as needed.

I was left in charge of the place, at least once,  when "the boss", Floyd White, went commercial fishing in his all mahogany Owens cabin cruiser.  I don't know how anyone knew I was "in charge"; I just had the keys and knew where the cash was. 

One night I got a call at home.   The coast guard was on the line.  That afternoon, they'd dropped the 36 footer's aft onto the north jetty.  They had every pump on it, barely keeping it floating, at the station.  Could I haul them out on the railway?  At high  tide, 12:30 AM?   I don't know what I said to them, but I knew I'd have to figure out how to run the ways.  I set up at least one football light to see down the tracks.   I managed to get the engine started, and fooled around with the transmission tabs,  tested "in or out" with the clutch lever, and got the carriage in the water.   Once the crew had the boat on, I moved a transmission tab, who knows what comedy of things I tried, I didn't know anything- such as reverse and 1st gear being on one tab, and 2nd and 3rd on the other, things learned after I got a Willys wagon. Anyway,  started it up, "let out" the clutch, and killed the engine,  but the cart was at least headed uphill.  Did that a few more times, and got the boat out of the water.

Later I figured out, or may have been told, that I'd pulled the boat out in 3rd gear, hence the need for all that clutch work.  And that's my experience with 36 foot double ended lifeboats.

Dan















Shenadoah fabric covered boat build

dan mulholland
 

Everyone,

John asked for a report on this project.   I did send John a note about this, but my messages to him go into a bucket called "worse than spam" and he didn't get it.

I'm working on the parts, to create a boat kit, to take to Florence to assemble. The plans call for clear, 14' clear cedar for the stringers, keel, and rails.  I was lucky enough to have a friend in Portland that had 1X12's, 14' long,  which he contributed to the project. (He does know that he contributed...)

I borrowed a thickness planer to clean them up; it's hard to fit 1X12's in a 10" wide planer.




There are areas of each board that are clear end to end, so I ripped and planed.



It's nice to work with good material, smells good, too.

When done, there are a bunch of 3/4" thick pieces of various widths:



Then there are the 2X4's for the oars-and, I hope to use this material for breast hooks, the one knee, and thwarts, perhaps.



The fan and dehumidifier action have the boards at or very close to the expected moisture level of kiln dried material.  There are a couple of 2X6's as well.  There is some bug damage to work around.

The plans call for hardwood flooring, so to speak; had some white oak, shown in process below.




One concern was how to install these floorboards.  The plan instructions said, kind of, to cut the holes for the floorboards after the frame is assembled.  But maybe not.  I looked at this for a while, and corresponded with the designer, who confessed that the description of how these went in was, well, not quite accurate...I'm learning that boat plans are more like recipes than Ikea assembly instructions.   Anyway, I set up the strongback, and clamped on the offending frames, cut the holes, and hope it will come together as appropriate.  Below is a picture with the strongback and 3 of the 5 frames.



Next up are the oars.  Here's the package from down under, cut off a little, the bottom of the oarlocks and the sockets.  The blades are the key item.  The cedar shafts will have a fork, or slot, for the blade.




So, getting closer to assembly.

Dan





























Re: Earl's Bentwood Chair

cherrill boissonou
 

Yes....those are the blanks for the arms🌝
Earl🧙‍♂️⚓️

On Feb 2, 2021, at 1:21 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

More progress on the chair. Now he's waiting for the components to air-dry to 5%-8.5% moisture content before going any further:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmT6VyDV

Am I correct in guessing that those wide slats will go on the arms?

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Missionaries, my Dear! Don't you realize that missionaries are the divinely provided food for destitute cannibals? Whenever they are on the brink of starvation, Heaven in its infinite mercy sends them a nice plump missionary. (Oscar Wilde)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com






Re: Victory

Bob Miller
 

I believe the preferred nautical term is "docked" vs "grounded."

Bob



Sender notified by
Mailtrack 02/03/21, 03:09:41 PM


On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 1:18 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Some years ago the CG decreed that the 47-footers couldn't go out if the
seas were above some moderately awful, but not uncommon on our coast,
height. IIRC, the surfmen weren't happy about the restriction. Maybe it
got rescinded later? The 52s were the only lifeboats allowed out when
the 47s were grounded.

On 2/3/2021 4:43 AM, Case Turner wrote:
> Roger wrote:
>
> “You say the 52' boats are saved for the really difficult situations.
>
> How often do the 47' boats turn out to be inadequate, and a 52' boat is used, and in what kinds of circumstances?”
>
> Where the 52’ really shines is it’s long range towing capabilities. The range and the amount that it can safely tow is considerably more that that if the 47’. For Newport with its large commercial fleet the Victory has been a workhorse its entire service.
>
> Hard shoes to fill for sure when she won’t be able Tom make those long runs to tow home a disabled boat.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Winter, a lingering season, is a time to gather golden moments, embark
upon a sentimental journey, and enjoy every idle hour. (John Boswell)


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Re: Victory

Case Turner
 

John I too have a soft spot for the 36’. I was able to cross the bar on 36535 In Depoe Bay. It was the last active 36 footer in service. My self, my uncle and dad were on board and the current chief of the station at the time. It was a warm sunny day and the ocean was FAC ( Flat A$$ Calm).

I’m pretty sure there’s a photo somewhere. I’ll have to do some digging to try and find it.

Case

Sent from not here

On Feb 3, 2021, at 2:21 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

The Florence CG station has a 47-foot motor lifeboat. Please pardon the F******k link:

https://www.facebook.com/USCoastGuardSTASiuslawRiver/

It's possible that a cutter, probably Orcas, was visiting when you went kayaking by.

I've had a soft spot in my heart of the old 36-foot MLBs after a Sea Scout trip across the bar at Florence years ago...

Here's an interesting video about the CG lifeboats here in the NW:

https://youtu.be/1S2Sid2EfCg

On 2/3/2021 1:27 PM, Jove wrote:
You're right John, it might be one of the few things they agree on.
I saw an interview with an RNLI volunteer lifeboatman in Ireland and he said he does it for the ride. Going out during a big storm is the ride of a lifetime.
What is the coast guard boat in florence? I've kayaked past it, might be a cutter, looks bigger than a lifeboat.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
If a man is to be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most. A small sailing craft is not only beautiful, it is seductive and full of strange promise and the hint of trouble. (E. B. White)


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Re: Victory

 

The Florence CG station has a 47-foot motor lifeboat. Please pardon the F******k link:

https://www.facebook.com/USCoastGuardSTASiuslawRiver/

It's possible that a cutter, probably Orcas, was visiting when you went kayaking by.

I've had a soft spot in my heart of the old 36-foot MLBs after a Sea Scout trip across the bar at Florence years ago...

Here's an interesting video about the CG lifeboats here in the NW:

https://youtu.be/1S2Sid2EfCg

On 2/3/2021 1:27 PM, Jove wrote:
You're right John, it might be one of the few things they agree on.
I saw an interview with an RNLI volunteer lifeboatman in Ireland and he said he does it for the ride. Going out during a big storm is the ride of a lifetime.
What is the coast guard boat in florence? I've kayaked past it, might be a cutter, looks bigger than a lifeboat.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
If a man is to be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most. A small sailing craft is not only beautiful, it is seductive and full of strange promise and the hint of trouble. (E. B. White)
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Re: Victory

 

Thanks for the video, George. Too bad they spoiled an otherwise great video with some annoying speeding up and slowing down. <sigh> No surf play, unfortunately, but a few years a go all the 52s got together at Newport:

https://youtu.be/Qrw1Mi3Qgas

The steel 52-footers were built to replace two wooden lifeboats of the same length. One of them, Triumph, was involved in a tragic rescue attempt on the Columbia River bar:

https://youtu.be/r_WsitQSNeg

The other, Invincible, ended it's days as a commercial fishing boat. She was broken up at River Bend after Bill Wechter had bought her for her aluminum house, and then, IIRC, had sold her to another fisherman, who never got her back in the water.

On 2/2/2021 7:39 PM, George C wrote:
Here's a great video of Victory along with a 47' playing in the waves. It might have been posted here before. I love  Victory's motion and how she take the waves, not near as dampened as the 47. Also like how she is painted white.
I've watched this video way too many times.
https://youtu.be/SGhFxYf2ixc <https://youtu.be/SGhFxYf2ixc>
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat, but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires. (John Steinbeck)
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Re: Victory

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

You're right John, it might be one of the few things they agree on.
I saw an interview with an RNLI volunteer lifeboatman in Ireland and he said he does it for the ride. Going out during a big storm is the ride of a lifetime.
What is the coast guard boat in florence? I've kayaked past it, might be a cutter, looks bigger than a lifeboat.
-Jove


On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 12:47 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'd like to see some footage of what's going on in the wheelhouse when
Thunder Child land after flying through the air off of the top of a
wave. <g> Somewhere I saw a video of a new RNLI lifeboat being tried out
by the crew at her assigned station. There were shots inside the
wheelhouse of smiling lifeboatmen sitting in sprung seats with what
looked like at least a couple of feet of travel! :o) But the boat wasn't
flying through the air like Thunder Child. <g>

The Thunder Child video doesn't give much time to what happens when the
waves get to bad for flying through the air. Mentioning that the boat
just tries to get along slowly and keep her crew safe. I'll bet it's a
handful in a following sea with that fat ass...

BTW, the RNLI is an interesting organization. Almost all the lifeboatmen
and lifeboatwomen (or are they all "lifeboatmen" whatever their sex,
like all commercial fishermen?) are volunteers, and the Institution is a
charity. It's also something that the Irish and English agree on. ;o)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_National_Lifeboat_Institution

On 2/2/2021 10:50 PM, Jove wrote:
> This is "thunder child" a high speed ocean rescue and interceptor.
> Designed and built in Cork, where I went to college, although I only
> learned of these guys after I left for the USA.
> More boats bouncing over big waves from the safety of my couch. :)
> https://vimeo.com/202978684 <https://vimeo.com/202978684>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
I have noticed that people who are late are often so much jollier than
the people who have to wait for them. (Edward Verrall Lucas)


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