Date   

Re: Victory

George Costakis
 

Roger,

The article that John linked in his original post gave the example of a failed generator resulting in losing the radar and navigation system during a rescue. Anyways, I'm sure there are much more systems on this boat then just the engine and steering.

George

On Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 8:00:46 PM PST, Roger Padvorac <roger@...> wrote:



I'm ignoring most email for the time being, but wondered at the size 
and subject of this one.

Previously I hadn't paid attention to the difference between the 52' 
and 47' boats.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/47-foot_Motor_Lifeboat
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/52-foot_Motor_Lifeboat

In short, the 47' boat is a wimp compared to the 52' boat.

You are right, they are amazing - the pictures in those Wikipedia 
articles says it all.

I'd be very surprised if this country builds a useful replacement for 
the 52' boats. The navy has a pretty poor track record for the last 
decade.

Every day I take a look at RT.com because its a reliable source of bad 
news that will affect my life (like efforts to cut Social Security). 
There are a surprising number of WA/OR articles there. I also read 
some of the compare and contrast opinion essays there.

Our culture has lost the competence of the mid 20th century - too many 
people stopped doing the hard thankless work of cultural stewardship 
and we've lost a lot of our cultural capital.

* * * *
The 47' boats started coming into service in 1997, and there are 227 
of them, so they will be around for a while.

You say the 52' boats are saved for the really difficult situations.

How often do the 47' boats turn out to be inadequate, and a 52' boat 
is used, and in what kinds of circumstances?

I've survived my adventures by paying attention to the fallback 
options, which is why I put some thought into this subject, once I 
took a look at it.

* * * *
After I thought a bit, I wondered, what do you mean by old?

Engines and steering gear can be rebuilt or replaced, and on a boat 
like this there isn't much else that is essential, expensive, and 
takes a lot of work to maintain.

Why don't they just replace the engines and steering gear?

Sincerely,
Roger

Quoting John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>:

> Victory's my favorite CG boat too, with the other steel 52-footers 
> close behind. But they're Old. It's getting so it's hard to keep 
> them going, so Victory sits idle, waiting to be used only when her 
> capabilities are _really_ needed. I'll miss the 52s when they're 
> gone, but their replacements should have been ready years ago. 
> <sigh> I hope when the replacements for the 52-footers are finally 
> developed and built that they perform as well in the really awful 
> stuff as Victory, but I'll bet they won't have as much class as she 
> has.
>
> On 2/1/2021 1:25 PM, Case wrote:
>> My favorite CG boat ever. Pretty amazing boat.
>>
>> I got to go for a short cruise on her across the bay once.
>>
>>> https://newportnewstimes.com/article/victory-the-queen-of-the-fleet
>
> --
> John <jkohnen@...>
> Laws are like cobwebs which may catch small flies, but let wasps and 
> hornets break through. (Jonathan Swift)
>
>
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> https://www.avg.com
>
>
>








Re: Victory

Roger Padvorac
 

I'm ignoring most email for the time being, but wondered at the size and subject of this one.

Previously I hadn't paid attention to the difference between the 52' and 47' boats.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/47-foot_Motor_Lifeboat
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/52-foot_Motor_Lifeboat

In short, the 47' boat is a wimp compared to the 52' boat.

You are right, they are amazing - the pictures in those Wikipedia articles says it all.

I'd be very surprised if this country builds a useful replacement for the 52' boats. The navy has a pretty poor track record for the last decade.

Every day I take a look at RT.com because its a reliable source of bad news that will affect my life (like efforts to cut Social Security). There are a surprising number of WA/OR articles there. I also read some of the compare and contrast opinion essays there.

Our culture has lost the competence of the mid 20th century - too many people stopped doing the hard thankless work of cultural stewardship and we've lost a lot of our cultural capital.

* * * *
The 47' boats started coming into service in 1997, and there are 227 of them, so they will be around for a while.

You say the 52' boats are saved for the really difficult situations.

How often do the 47' boats turn out to be inadequate, and a 52' boat is used, and in what kinds of circumstances?

I've survived my adventures by paying attention to the fallback options, which is why I put some thought into this subject, once I took a look at it.

* * * *
After I thought a bit, I wondered, what do you mean by old?

Engines and steering gear can be rebuilt or replaced, and on a boat like this there isn't much else that is essential, expensive, and takes a lot of work to maintain.

Why don't they just replace the engines and steering gear?

Sincerely,
Roger

Quoting John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>:

Victory's my favorite CG boat too, with the other steel 52-footers close behind. But they're Old. It's getting so it's hard to keep them going, so Victory sits idle, waiting to be used only when her capabilities are _really_ needed. I'll miss the 52s when they're gone, but their replacements should have been ready years ago. <sigh> I hope when the replacements for the 52-footers are finally developed and built that they perform as well in the really awful stuff as Victory, but I'll bet they won't have as much class as she has.

On 2/1/2021 1:25 PM, Case wrote:
My favorite CG boat ever. Pretty amazing boat.

I got to go for a short cruise on her across the bay once.

https://newportnewstimes.com/article/victory-the-queen-of-the-fleet
--
John <jkohnen@...>
Laws are like cobwebs which may catch small flies, but let wasps and hornets break through. (Jonathan Swift)



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Re: Victory

George Costakis
 

Here's a great video of Victory along with a 47' playing in the waves. It might have been posted here before. I love  Victory's motion and how she take the waves, not near as dampened as the 47. Also like how she is painted white.

I've watched this video way too many times.


George

On Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 1:36:41 PM PST, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:


Victory's my favorite CG boat too, with the other steel 52-footers close
behind. But they're Old. It's getting so it's hard to keep them going,
so Victory sits idle, waiting to be used only when her capabilities are
_really_ needed. I'll miss the 52s when they're gone, but their
replacements should have been ready years ago. <sigh> I hope when the
replacements for the 52-footers are finally developed and built that
they perform as well in the really awful stuff as Victory, but I'll bet
they won't have as much class as she has.

On 2/1/2021 1:25 PM, Case wrote:
> My favorite CG boat ever. Pretty amazing boat.
>
> I got to go for a short cruise on her across the bay once.
>
>> https://newportnewstimes.com/article/victory-the-queen-of-the-fleet

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Laws are like cobwebs which may catch small flies, but let wasps and
hornets break through. (Jonathan Swift)



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Re: Victory

 

Victory's my favorite CG boat too, with the other steel 52-footers close behind. But they're Old. It's getting so it's hard to keep them going, so Victory sits idle, waiting to be used only when her capabilities are _really_ needed. I'll miss the 52s when they're gone, but their replacements should have been ready years ago. <sigh> I hope when the replacements for the 52-footers are finally developed and built that they perform as well in the really awful stuff as Victory, but I'll bet they won't have as much class as she has.

On 2/1/2021 1:25 PM, Case wrote:
My favorite CG boat ever. Pretty amazing boat.
I got to go for a short cruise on her across the bay once.

https://newportnewstimes.com/article/victory-the-queen-of-the-fleet
--
John <jkohnen@...>
Laws are like cobwebs which may catch small flies, but let wasps and hornets break through. (Jonathan Swift)
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Earl's Bentwood Chair

 

More progress on the chair. Now he's waiting for the components to air-dry to 5%-8.5% moisture content before going any further:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmT6VyDV

Am I correct in guessing that those wide slats will go on the arms?

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Missionaries, my Dear! Don't you realize that missionaries are the divinely provided food for destitute cannibals? Whenever they are on the brink of starvation, Heaven in its infinite mercy sends them a nice plump missionary. (Oscar Wilde)


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Re: Fern Ridge Dam Closing Ceremony, Saturday, the 6th

Claire Acord
 

It must be bleached out sawdust from Dan's latest massive building project...what else could it be?
stay safe out there
cheers
Claire


On Tue, Feb 2, 2021 at 12:46 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
What's that white stuff?

On 2/2/2021 11:20 AM, Dan in Almostcanada wrote:
> Each messabout begins with a single trailer-hitching...dancing for rain,
> here, too.  Dan.
--
John <jkohnen@...>
It's remarkable how quickly a good and favorable wind can sweep away the
maddening frustrations of shore living. (Ernest K. Gann)


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Re: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades

 

Dan tricked us by showing us that confusing illustration. <sigh> <g> It all becomes clear when you look at the entire instructions. First cut the 2x4 into a parallelogram, then you can cut it into two matching tapered “isosceles trapezoids”.

I eagerly await seeing Dan's new oars in action.

How's the boat coming along, Dan? Any pictures to show us?

On 2/2/2021 9:05 AM, Mark N wrote:
first you cut a parallelogram, Angle doesn't seem to be given,
If I'm reading the instructions correctly in this link, it's 10 degrees, no?
https://gacooarlocks.com/plans-for-making-oars.pdf
--
John <jkohnen@...>
If you can't be a good example, then you'll just have to be a horrible warning. (Catherine the Great)
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Re: Fern Ridge Dam Closing Ceremony, Saturday, the 6th

 

What's that white stuff?

On 2/2/2021 11:20 AM, Dan in Almostcanada wrote:
Each messabout begins with a single trailer-hitching...dancing for rain,
here, too. Dan.
--
John <jkohnen@...>
It's remarkable how quickly a good and favorable wind can sweep away the maddening frustrations of shore living. (Ernest K. Gann)
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Re: Fern Ridge Dam Closing Ceremony, Saturday, the 6th

Dan
 

Each messabout begins with a single trailer-hitching...dancing for rain,
here, too. Dan.


Re: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades

Mark Neuhaus
 



On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 8:22 PM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:

first you cut a parallelogram, Angle doesn't seem to be given,

If I'm reading the instructions correctly in this link, it's 10 degrees, no?

 
Mark


Re: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Yes, I agree he's talking about the saw blade.
first you cut a parallelogram, Angle doesn't seem to be given, then cut down the middle at a slight angle (a slightly tricky cut you'll need to have a carrier board or a taper attached). Looks like he actually recommends a hand held circular saw.
The looms are nested in the board thing end to thin end.
The NOTE WELL is saying.... make sure you don't cut 2 parallelograms, but instead lean your blad opposite so you cut 2 trapezoids.
In my experience saws only lean one way, so you'll have to flip the board.
-Jove



On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 8:02 PM dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:
of course, he's talking about the blade of the saw, not the oar!


From: Dan Mulholland
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 6:36 PM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades
 
OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.




I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


Re: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades

dan mulholland
 

of course, he's talking about the blade of the saw, not the oar!


From: Dan Mulholland
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 6:36 PM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades
 
OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.




I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


Re: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades

Earl Boissonou
 

Dan,
Looking again I see from a head on view of the cross section it is not a rectangle, rather it is slanted parallelogram. I know I’m not answering your question......just letting you know what I see. There’s an allusion that the long side view would show an angled cut off at each end, but I think the angle is 90 degrees.
🧙‍♂️🌝⚓️Earl


On Feb 1, 2021, at 7:09 PM, cherrill boissonou via groups.io <cboissonou@...> wrote:

Dan,
If you look at the top middle line from end to end, it looks like pair of oars tapered thin end to butt with one butt showing in front and the other at the back. 🧙‍♂️🌝⚓️
Earl


On Feb 1, 2021, at 6:36 PM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:

OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.


<Gaco Oar Diagram.png>


I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


Re: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades

Earl Boissonou
 

Dan,
If you look at the top middle line from end to end, it looks like pair of oars tapered thin end to butt with one butt showing in front and the other at the back. 🧙‍♂️🌝⚓️
Earl


On Feb 1, 2021, at 6:36 PM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:

OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.


<Gaco Oar Diagram.png>


I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades

dan mulholland
 

OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.




I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


Re: Fern Ridge Dam Closing Ceremony, Saturday, the 6th

Josh
 

Regrettably Saturday is a work day for me but I'll be there with you in spirit.
Josh 


Re: Another movie recommendation

Case Turner
 

Steve thanks for adding the recommendation on the museum. I spaced that out! 

It’s super cool. 

Case


On Feb 1, 2021, at 2:17 PM, Stephen Miller <w7srmsteve@...> wrote:


I watched The Dig last night.  Very good.  After you watch it go the British Museum online to get more info on what they unearth.  Don't go before you watch or it's a spoiler!

Steve Miller

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021, 1:27 PM Case Turner <casesturner@...> wrote:
For those with Netflix and those that like British films, The Dig is an entertaining film based on a true story.

Case

Sent from not here

--
Dirt






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Dirt


Re: Another movie recommendation

Stephen Miller
 

I watched The Dig last night.  Very good.  After you watch it go the British Museum online to get more info on what they unearth.  Don't go before you watch or it's a spoiler!

Steve Miller

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021, 1:27 PM Case Turner <casesturner@...> wrote:
For those with Netflix and those that like British films, The Dig is an entertaining film based on a true story.

Case

Sent from not here

--
Dirt






Re: Fern Ridge Dam Closing Ceremony, Saturday, the 6th

elaineginader
 

I'll work at being there.


On Mon, Feb 1, 2021, 1:05 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
The Corps of Engineers is supposed to put the plug back in at Fern Ridge
today. Their reservoir Web pages are down, so I can't check on them...
<sigh> I suppose I could drive by and look. <g>

http://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf

To ensure that we get enough rain this late winter and spring to fill
Fern Ridge let's meet at Orchard Point Park (ignore the Coot Calendar --
parking is easier at Orchard Point) at 1:00 Saturday to offer sacrifices
to the rain gods and dance naked, or in weather appropriate clothing, on
the docks at the launch ramp. Be prepared for social distancing and mask
wearing. Bring lunch and something to sacrifice to the gods. In the
past, people have brought samples of water from adventures on far
waters, but I think the gods will be happy with libations.

We didn't have a dam closing ceremony last year and look what happened!!

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Winter blues are  cured every time with a potato gratin paired with a
roast chicken. (Alexandra Guarnaschelli)

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Another movie recommendation

Case Turner
 

For those with Netflix and those that like British films, The Dig is an entertaining film based on a true story.

Case

Sent from not here

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