Date   

Naphtha Launches (was: Any Authors Out There?)

 

I've read that flashback fires from the boilers weren't uncommon in naphtha launches, but, while they looked spectacular at night, they didn't cause any damage, and serious accidents were rare. It seems amazing that a contraption that heated a liquid similar to gasoline in a boiler to make "steam" could have such a good safety record.

IIRC, there was only one manufacturer of naphtha powerplants, and they were only put in a few makes of boats, with tight control from the engine maker on the installation. The engine compartment was metal lined, and the engine and boiler were installed as a unit. The fuel tank was up in the bow, and the fuel line was routed outside the hull, below the waterline, between the tank and the powerplant. I think Westy Farmer wrote an article about naphtha launches. I'll have to dig up my copy of From My Old Boatshop and look...

Interesting boats, for sure. <g>

Today we take for granted hopping into our cars and driving down the freeway at more than a mile a minute with a bomb in the trunk. Imagine what would happen if gasoline engines hadn't been invented, and somebody today tried to convince us that vehicles burning gasoline were safe. ;o)

On 11/25/2020 8:23 PM, Myles T wrote:
The cool thing about the 'naphta launches' was the simplicity. As with a steam boat, you needed a burner to create the phase change in the working fluid from liquid to vapor, but in the case of the naphtha launches, the working fluid was the same as the fluid burned to create the heat. Scary, convenient, compact and evidently not that many instances of fires/explosions. And unlike steam boats, you didn't need to have a licensed engineer onboard.
Evidently they didn't even require a throttle valve, simply control the fuel burn rate and the motor responded.
There was someone in Newberg I met once that had a naphtha engine---think I got to see it once...

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
As a general truth, communities prosper and flourish, or droop and decline, in just the degree that they practise or neglect to practise the primary duties of justice and humanity. (William Henry Seward)
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Re: Any Authors Out There?

John Weiss
 

FWIW, I added this to the description on our Facebook page:

"Sail, rowing, and paddle craft using fiberglass, epoxy, carbon, Kevlar, etc. are all welcome! "Small" MAY mean trailerable, hand-launchable, or significantly smaller than the USS Nimitz... We just want to make "boat" a verb!"

On 11/25/20 20:23, Myles Twete wrote:
The cool thing about the 'naphta launches' was the simplicity. As with a steam boat, you needed a burner to create the phase change in the working fluid from liquid to vapor, but in the case of the naphtha launches, the working fluid was the same as the fluid burned to create the heat. Scary, convenient, compact and evidently not that many instances of fires/explosions. And unlike steam boats, you didn't need to have a licensed engineer onboard.
Evidently they didn't even require a throttle valve, simply control the fuel burn rate and the motor responded.
-----Original Message-----
From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Kohnen
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 6:05 PM
Thanks, John. Alas, the ACBS is pretty much all about mahogany runabouts, leaving old-fashioned low-powered internal combustion boats out in the cold... Anybody got a naphtha launch? One of those would fit into the TSCA mission, not to mention being a lot of fun, especially for pyromaniacs! ;o) Steamboats fit too, but they've got there own organizations.
"The Traditional Small Craft Association, Inc., is a nonprofit educational organization working to preserve and continue the living traditions, skills, lore, and legends surrounding working and pleasure watercraft whose origins predate the marine gasoline engine. We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."
Anyway, the Ash Breeze won't be too picky, as long as you don't stretch "traditional" way too far.


Re: Any Authors Out There?

Myles Twete
 

The cool thing about the 'naphta launches' was the simplicity. As with a steam boat, you needed a burner to create the phase change in the working fluid from liquid to vapor, but in the case of the naphtha launches, the working fluid was the same as the fluid burned to create the heat. Scary, convenient, compact and evidently not that many instances of fires/explosions. And unlike steam boats, you didn't need to have a licensed engineer onboard.

Evidently they didn't even require a throttle valve, simply control the fuel burn rate and the motor responded.

There was someone in Newberg I met once that had a naphtha engine---think I got to see it once...

-----Original Message-----
From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Kohnen
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 6:05 PM
To: Oregon Coots <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Any Authors Out There?

Thanks, John. Alas, the ACBS is pretty much all about mahogany runabouts, leaving old-fashioned low-powered internal combustion boats out in the cold... Anybody got a naphtha launch? One of those would fit into the TSCA mission, not to mention being a lot of fun, especially for pyromaniacs! ;o) Steamboats fit too, but they've got there own organizations.

"The Traditional Small Craft Association, Inc., is a nonprofit educational organization working to preserve and continue the living traditions, skills, lore, and legends surrounding working and pleasure watercraft whose origins predate the marine gasoline engine. We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."

Anyway, the Ash Breeze won't be too picky, as long as you don't stretch "traditional" way too far.

Our steamer friends:

https://www.northweststeamsociety.org/

On 11/25/2020 5:40 PM, John W wrote:
Yes, the last sentence in the TSCA "mission statement" is

"We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats,
and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of
traditional designs."

Electric powered boats certainly come under this umbrella. Power
boats are more the domain of the Antique and Classic Boat Society, but
TSCA has never denied admission to a powered small boat.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican. (H. L. Mencken)


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Re: Any Authors Out There?

 

Thanks, John. Alas, the ACBS is pretty much all about mahogany runabouts, leaving old-fashioned low-powered internal combustion boats out in the cold... Anybody got a naphtha launch? One of those would fit into the TSCA mission, not to mention being a lot of fun, especially for pyromaniacs! ;o) Steamboats fit too, but they've got there own organizations.

"The Traditional Small Craft Association, Inc., is a nonprofit educational organization working to preserve and continue the living traditions, skills, lore, and legends surrounding working and pleasure watercraft whose origins predate the marine gasoline engine. We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."

Anyway, the Ash Breeze won't be too picky, as long as you don't stretch "traditional" way too far.

Our steamer friends:

https://www.northweststeamsociety.org/

On 11/25/2020 5:40 PM, John W wrote:
Yes, the last sentence in the TSCA "mission statement" is
     "We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."
Electric powered boats certainly come under this umbrella.  Power boats are more the domain of the Antique and Classic Boat Society, but TSCA has never denied admission to a powered small boat.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican. (H. L. Mencken)
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Re: Any Authors Out There?

Richard Green
 

Ah, the only thing historic around here is me……

Rich

On Nov 25, 2020, at 4:40 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

The articles should be about boating, boatbuilding, boat repair, boat gadgets, etc. that can be considered to be related to a _loose_ definition of "traditional small craft". For example, they accepted an article from Andrew on Puddle Ducks. Of course articles on historic small boats and historic activities are very welcome too. The TSCA used to be snobs* about sail and oar, or paddle, craft, in fact it's even in their "mission" statement, but I think they should loosen up a bit and embrace old-fashioned, low-powered motorboats, and their electric cousins. Sending articles about such boats, maybe Dan P's Ginger, to the Ash Breeze might break the ice.

andy@marinermedia.com

*The TSCA is much less snobby nowadays than they used to be. Our NW chapters aren't snobby at all! :o)

On 11/25/2020 4:20 PM, Rich G wrote:
What are the parameters, if any?
The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)

Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>

"Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash Breeze. This month he's falling a bit short again. If you have any stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities, please send them to Andy at andy@marinermedia.com. Pass this to all your members as well.
...
--
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I just think it's rather odd that a nation that prides itself on its virility should feel compelled to strap on forty pounds of protective gear just in order to play rugby. (Rupert Giles on American football)


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Re: Any Authors Out There?

 

The articles should be about boating, boatbuilding, boat repair, boat gadgets, etc. that can be considered to be related to a _loose_ definition of "traditional small craft". For example, they accepted an article from Andrew on Puddle Ducks. Of course articles on historic small boats and historic activities are very welcome too. The TSCA used to be snobs* about sail and oar, or paddle, craft, in fact it's even in their "mission" statement, but I think they should loosen up a bit and embrace old-fashioned, low-powered motorboats, and their electric cousins. Sending articles about such boats, maybe Dan P's Ginger, to the Ash Breeze might break the ice.

andy@marinermedia.com

*The TSCA is much less snobby nowadays than they used to be. Our NW chapters aren't snobby at all! :o)

On 11/25/2020 4:20 PM, Rich G wrote:
What are the parameters, if any?

The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)

Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>

"Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash Breeze. This month he's falling a bit short again. If you have any stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities, please send them to Andy at andy@marinermedia.com. Pass this to all your members as well.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I just think it's rather odd that a nation that prides itself on its virility should feel compelled to strap on forty pounds of protective gear just in order to play rugby. (Rupert Giles on American football)
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Re: Any Authors Out There?

Richard Green
 

What are the parameters, if any?

Rich

On Nov 25, 2020, at 3:26 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)

Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>

"Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash Breeze. This month he's falling a bit short again. If you have any stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities, please send them to Andy at andy@marinermedia.com. Pass this to all your members as well.

"Don't forget that the Ash Breeze is largely what YOU as TSCA chapters and members make of it. Send Andy material ANY TIME, and it will likely get in the next issue. Don't worry too much about deadlines; there will always (we hope) be an upcoming issue!

"John Weiss
TSCA Chapter Coordinator"

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It's remarkable how quickly a good and favorable wind can sweep away the maddening frustrations of shore living. (Ernest K. Gann)


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Any Authors Out There?

 

The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)

Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>

"Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash Breeze. This month he's falling a bit short again. If you have any stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities, please send them to Andy at andy@marinermedia.com. Pass this to all your members as well.

"Don't forget that the Ash Breeze is largely what YOU as TSCA chapters and members make of it. Send Andy material ANY TIME, and it will likely get in the next issue. Don't worry too much about deadlines; there will always (we hope) be an upcoming issue!

"John Weiss
TSCA Chapter Coordinator"

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
It's remarkable how quickly a good and favorable wind can sweep away the maddening frustrations of shore living. (Ernest K. Gann)


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Re: Latest depth camera stuff again !! New shielded wiring to come along

Myles Twete
 

Shielding is nice but overrated.  If I could do shielding or something else, I’d rather implement twisted pairs on critical lines.

Fundamentally, what you want is signal integrity.

And to understand how best to achieve that requires an understanding of the noise source(s).

Too often I’ve worked for companies and engineers that don’t understand this and either don’t shield anything or shield without considering the alternatives or where to tie the shield.

 

Common things that destroy signal integrity include:

·       External EMI noise (e.g. electric or magnetic or e-m fields)---attention to routing, protection from noise sources helps here (twisted pair wiring and shields help here)

·       Current noise (e.g. due to ground loops---improper use of shields often cause these!)

I could go on…

 

Anyway, even the most seasoned electrical engineers don’t really appreciate the importance and nuances involved in this.  At one contract job I had, I was asked to develop a test fixture and procedure to test new DCDC converter “bricks” before they get installed onto a circuit board assembly.  The veteran ‘tech’ who had been testing these for years said that these things were suddenly failing right and left.  So I listened, then looked at the 20-year old design of the circuit and the specs on the DCDC.  Well, it turns out that the original design of the circuit (again, deployed now for decades) ignored the manufacturer’s safety instructions to ONLY connect one of 3 ground inputs to the external ground as the very sensitive circuitry connected all 3 internally and any external connections would cause ground loops and could blow the device.  Well, the client’s design grounded ALL 3 of these externally.

And so, my impression of what was happening was this ‘tech’ was suddenly testing these more recklessly than he had done in the past and ‘zapping’ these DCDCs due to this design flaw---had he been testing them this same way 2 decades ago, they’d have discovered the flaw---it’s best to fail early.

 

Anyway Cal, email me any info and I can give you my thoughts.

 

FWIW-

 

-Myles T

 

From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of Electri-Cal
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 8:52 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: [oregoncoots] Latest depth camera stuff again !! New shielded wiring to come along

 

First off, I got a refund on the other underwater video cam yesterday.  It did not have the zoom lens as I wanted, and the screen was slightly damaged in shipping.  I keep it, so I can give it away which is better than a throwing it out, later this coming year most likely at a show.   New one from another source with ZOOM video will be here before boating season, good on that but slow China delivery.  Cost is $40., vs, $82,or more in US, sooo, in winter no contest.  New one will also have removable pickup, so I can take it inside, or have backup remote pickups for different uses. 

Docking, or fishing, or lost underwater gear searching come to mind.  Yes, the water needs to be clear, but new one has 8 -bright led and dimmable lights, plus a camera with chip slot chip built in, for underwater looking around.  Where did the sunken homes get to, the giant Salmon or Sturgeon in the Siuslaw --  or those darn pilings upstream of Toledo, that I hit  ???  I might even try threading the needle at east Dexter on a good day.

While I'm here, I added a 50 ft. roll of four shielded 18 ga. wires as upgraded instrument wiring, with the well grounded shield cover to be put in Surprise when the weather warms.  The electric drive throws off my depth finder picture over 1 mph.  Might not help the above camera either.  So, when done all essential electrics will be rewired inside shielded cabling. As an afterthought, I'm looking for a split shielding to cover depth finder factory sensor cabling.  All this is a grade A pain to do, but a good idea with all the electronics now coming along.  Probably need to call Bob Larkin or Myles Tweete on this subject, but I think the decent size wire will make this install robust enough.  Wish I could get the boat inside the garage for this, but gotta love the propane heater and wall tarp  !!

Days getting along, so me too,   Cal









Latest depth camera stuff again !! New shielded wiring to come along

Electri-Cal
 

First off, I got a refund on the other underwater video cam yesterday.  It did not have the zoom lens as I wanted, and the screen was slightly damaged in shipping.  I keep it, so I can give it away which is better than a throwing it out, later this coming year most likely at a show.   New one from another source with ZOOM video will be here before boating season, good on that but slow China delivery.  Cost is $40., vs, $82,or more in US, sooo, in winter no contest.  New one will also have removable pickup, so I can take it inside, or have backup remote pickups for different uses. 

Docking, or fishing, or lost underwater gear searching come to mind.  Yes, the water needs to be clear, but new one has 8 -bright led and dimmable lights, plus a camera with chip slot chip built in, for underwater looking around.  Where did the sunken homes get to, the giant Salmon or Sturgeon in the Siuslaw --  or those darn pilings upstream of Toledo, that I hit  ???  I might even try threading the needle at east Dexter on a good day.

While I'm here, I added a 50 ft. roll of four shielded 18 ga. wires as upgraded instrument wiring, with the well grounded shield cover to be put in Surprise when the weather warms.  The electric drive throws off my depth finder picture over 1 mph.  Might not help the above camera either.  So, when done all essential electrics will be rewired inside shielded cabling. As an afterthought, I'm looking for a split shielding to cover depth finder factory sensor cabling.  All this is a grade A pain to do, but a good idea with all the electronics now coming along.  Probably need to call Bob Larkin or Myles Tweete on this subject, but I think the decent size wire will make this install robust enough.  Wish I could get the boat inside the garage for this, but gotta love the propane heater and wall tarp  !!

Days getting along, so me too,   Cal










Heads Up -- NEW Park Pass Regulations

Electri-Cal
 

WOW !!  Just checked links to Federal Park Passes.  Lots of changes, like new fees for lifetime ( har !) passes, different access, military, handicapped etc.  A load of other new stuff, most of which says pay more to support the services offered.  Window decals for motorcycles, also might be handy for kayaks, small boats on federal waters.  They didn't mention that, I would plan to ask at biMart, and on fed. web site later about that.    

Might as well check out the new stuff now, and avoid the coming rush.  Nope, not good with link moving to sites !!   I will leave it to John Kohnen , who will most likely have the links posted soon on this issue.    

Every Year New Fees, stay well and get ready for next year.   Cal        With "not much Surprise" -- at new costs.


Re: The Coots' Lending Library -- Will Have a Home!

Teresa Pittman
 

I haven't pulled things together to donate Lon's boat books to the Maritime Museum. I think this might be a better home for them. I'll try and get them all in one place.

“Throw out the radio and take the fiddle down from the wall.”
— Andrew Nelson Lytle, Tennessee, 1930

On Nov 21, 2020, at 1:30 AM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

The Retired Old Geezers at the Toledo Boathouses are going to be building a floating maritime library! :o) 20' x 20' with solar power, climate control and natural lighting. Due to the winter COVID surge, the project is going to take longer to complete than the rosy goal in the message below, but we hope it'll be well along by the time Bud retires in January.

Yes, Bud is retiring as Port Manager! <gasp>

I think we should donate all the books in the Coots' Lending Library to the Toledo Maritime Library. We'll have access to all the books during normal library hours, and we may even get a key or two for the Coots.

The Maritime Library still needs funding. Even if you can only give a little, your donation will be evidence of broad support for the Library, which'll help with shaking loose grants and business donations. This is a Worthy Project. You can send a check to the Port of Toledo with "Maritime Library Fund" on the note line to:

Maritime Library fund
Port of Toledo
PO Box 428
Toledo Oregon 97391

I'm writing my check right now. :o)

Thanks!

"Toledo Maritime Library

"Concept: Floating Library/reading room to supplement the Community Boathouse facilities. Completely free of all ties to the shore (power, water). Solar powered with enough energy to control heat and humidity. The roof would be sloped to take advantage of natural light and angle solar panels to power the facility. Windows would be arranged to provide filtered natural light, without allowing direct sunlight on the book shelf area.

"Structure - see attached sketch/plans

"Overview: The Toledo Community Boathouse Library will be a building used to house marine related books and boat plans. The books and plans will be available for people to borrow free of charge. Books and plans will also be able to be reviewed in the facility at the facility.

"The library will be open whenever the boathouse or boat shop are staffed with volunteers, typically on Thursdays throughout the year from 10:00 - 2:00 with additional hours in the summer on Thursdays from 10:00 - 6:00 and Sundays from 12:00 - 4:00 between Memorial Day and Labor Day.

"Construction of the facility will be a combined effort of the Port of Toledo staff and Volunteers from the Toledo Community Boathouse. The floating base of the building will be built at the Port of Toledo Boatyard. Once constructed, the float will be moved to the docks at the Toledo Community Boatshop where the volunteers will complete the construction of the facility.

"Ongoing maintenance will be incorporated into the current processes used for the two buildings already in use.

"We have access to many of the materials for this project which will come from recycled sources. We need $8000 to complete the project. Our goal is to have the funds raised by the end of November and have the building completed by the end of January.

"Fundraising activities will include a plea to the general public via social media. If need be we will apply for grants from businesses and organizations who have helped support our other programs at the Toledo Community Boathouse."

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library. (Jorge Luis Borges)



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<ToledoMaritimeLibray.jpg>


Re: [DM] [oregoncoots] Sinew

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Cats are a renewable resource!
The vast majority of artificial sinew I've ever heard of is polyester, And if anyone labels their rope or fiber as "poly" they don't deserve my money. Gotta have standards in advertising.
-Jove

On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 10:07 AM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
No-o-o! Save those poor cats and use the artificial sinew! <g>

On 11/22/2020 9:15 AM, Myles T wrote:
> If money's no object, there's always catgut...
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There are two means of refuge from the misery of life - music and cats.
(Albert Schweitzer)


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Re: Artificial Sinew

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

When I did my SOF I did several wraps of 45lb B55 polyester bowstirng material, Not waxed, I then dabbed each knot with super thin super glue, and spar varnished the whole frame.
A laborious approach, but I can be very sure those knots are not coming loose
I already had the B50 and Artificial sinew from an archery project in the past, Bought here.
The B55 is formulated for very low stretch, not that that's necessary an advantage for lashings.
For the sinew they have 4 OZ roles and 50, 75 and 100 lb in case anyone needs that.
I wonder if any of these would make a suitable sail repair thread?
It's interesting that I'm seeing a Prop65 cancer warning on all the polyester products, sinew, bowstring, Sail thread.
-Jove

On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 3:43 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Both links are correct, Pete. Dot org for the school, dot com for the store.

On November 22, 2020 12:03:21 PM PST, Pete L wrote:
>Thanks for catching my incorrect link, John, sorry for the hassle!~
>Pete
>
>https://www.skinboats.org/
>
> https://shop.skinboats.com
>


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A facility for quotation covers the absence of original thought. (Lord Peter Wimsey)
Sent from some sort of mobile device.






Re: Artificial Sinew

 

Both links are correct, Pete. Dot org for the school, dot com for the store.

On November 22, 2020 12:03:21 PM PST, Pete L wrote:
Thanks for catching my incorrect link, John, sorry for the hassle!~
Pete

https://www.skinboats.org/

https://shop.skinboats.com
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A facility for quotation covers the absence of original thought. (Lord Peter Wimsey)
Sent from some sort of mobile device.


Re: Artificial Sinew

Pete Leenhouts
 

Thanks for catching my incorrect link, John, sorry for the hassle!~ Pete


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Nov 21, 2020 11:12 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Artificial Sinew

Thanks, Pete. I hadn't heard of Corey's operation. The school's link is:

https://www.skinboats.org/

On 11/21/2020 12:32 PM, Pete L wrote:
> A bit late, but...when my wife and I built two baidarka's at Corey
> Freedman's Skin Boat School in Anacortes in '07, we used artificial
> sinew, which is available via his website https://shop.skinboats.com
> (and elsewhere, I'm sure). The baidarka's live outside under our deck,
> upside down when not in use, and show no signs of wear other than
> weathering.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
He got hold of the red meat of the language and turned it into
hamburgers. (Richard Gordon on Ernest Hemingway)


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Re: [DM] [oregoncoots] Sinew

 

No-o-o! Save those poor cats and use the artificial sinew! <g>

On 11/22/2020 9:15 AM, Myles T wrote:
If money's no object, there's always catgut...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
There are two means of refuge from the misery of life - music and cats. (Albert Schweitzer)
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Re: [DM] [oregoncoots] Sinew

Myles Twete
 

If money's no object, there's always catgut...


Re: [DM] [oregoncoots] Sinew

 

Good suggestion, Josh. But they don't tell us much on their Web site about what they carry:

https://tandyleather.com/search?type=article%2Cpage%2Cproduct&q=sinew*

In addition to the test weight, and whether or not it's braided, or waxed, there seem to be three materials used for artificial sinew: polypropylene, which doesn't stretch much at all; polyester, which stretches a little; and nylon, which stretches quite a bit. When they say "poly" what do they mean? Polyester and polypropylene are quite different. <shrug> Choices, choices... <sigh> They probably all work well enough. In other kinds of lashing and seizing I haven't noticed that the tarred nylon seine twine I use loosens from the stretch of the nylon. I think most of the stretch is taken out when tightening the turns, and the elasticity might even grip tighter. Andrew probably never even reads the label, and his boats don't fall apart. ;o)

https://smile.amazon.com/s?k=artificial+sinew&ref=nb_sb_noss_1

On 11/21/2020 2:47 PM, Josh wrote:
Leather supply places like Tandy's. I have some but not enough for a project like that.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The greatest analgesic, soporific, stimulant, tranquilizer, narcotic, and to some extent even antibiotic -- in short, the closest thing to a genuine panacea -- known to medical science is work. (Thomas Szasz)
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Re: Artificial Sinew

 

Thanks, Pete. I hadn't heard of Corey's operation. The school's link is:

https://www.skinboats.org/

On 11/21/2020 12:32 PM, Pete L wrote:
A bit late, but...when my wife and I built two baidarka's at Corey Freedman's Skin Boat School in Anacortes in '07, we used artificial sinew, which is available via his website https://shop.skinboats.com (and elsewhere, I'm sure). The baidarka's live outside under our deck, upside down when not in use, and show no signs of wear other than weathering.
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
He got hold of the red meat of the language and turned it into hamburgers. (Richard Gordon on Ernest Hemingway)
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