Date   

Re: Coots' Contact List

cherrill boissonou
 

Haven’t got it yet, but it might still be in the mail......took it you meant: “ Postal d’Escargot” 🧙‍♂️🚣🏼‍♂️⛵️⚓️🔱
Earl

On Oct 9, 2020, at 12:54 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

I just sent out the latest Coot's Contact List. If you think you should have got it, please let me know; I probably have an outdated email address for you.

The List is private. Only those Coots who choose to share their contact info in the List receive it. If you'd like to be added to the Coot's Contact List, let me know. Please give a cell phone number, if you've got one, so Coots can get ahold of you at messabouts and boat shows. If you're a ham, give your call sign.

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The problem with some people is that when they aren’t drunk, they’re sober. (William Butler Yeats)


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Coots' Contact List

 

I just sent out the latest Coot's Contact List. If you think you should have got it, please let me know; I probably have an outdated email address for you.

The List is private. Only those Coots who choose to share their contact info in the List receive it. If you'd like to be added to the Coot's Contact List, let me know. Please give a cell phone number, if you've got one, so Coots can get ahold of you at messabouts and boat shows. If you're a ham, give your call sign.

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The problem with some people is that when they aren’t drunk, they’re sober. (William Butler Yeats)


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Re: The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

Lee Tapper
 

Should be “are the opposite” not “and the opposite” .  Typo

 

From: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lee Tapper via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 9, 2020 11:46 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

 

In some ways the character traits that it takes to get the boat and the resources for a long voyage and the opposite of the character traits for enjoying it once you are on the trip.  The first suggests a very type A personality and the second suggests someone that is more laid back.

 

Lee

 

From: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io> On Behalf Of Brandon via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 9, 2020 9:14 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

 

I love these stories! People should chase their dreams even if there’s a chance they will turn into nightmares. Seems like every marina we stay at has at least a dozen folks who are constantly getting ready to leave on their “voyage around something” and they never cut the dock lines. Yea for anyone who gets that done. 

 

The dentist story reminds me of a ketch that Ed Monk Sr. designed for a dentist who served the small towns in southeastern Alaska. Nice boat. Had a dentist chair even. 

 

Brandon 


Re: The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

Lee Tapper
 

In some ways the character traits that it takes to get the boat and the resources for a long voyage and the opposite of the character traits for enjoying it once you are on the trip.  The first suggests a very type A personality and the second suggests someone that is more laid back.

 

Lee

 

From: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io> On Behalf Of Brandon via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 9, 2020 9:14 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

 

I love these stories! People should chase their dreams even if there’s a chance they will turn into nightmares. Seems like every marina we stay at has at least a dozen folks who are constantly getting ready to leave on their “voyage around something” and they never cut the dock lines. Yea for anyone who gets that done. 

 

The dentist story reminds me of a ketch that Ed Monk Sr. designed for a dentist who served the small towns in southeastern Alaska. Nice boat. Had a dentist chair even. 

 

Brandon 



Re: John's Classic 12

Bob Miller
 

I've used this to load several boats including a Klepper Aerius II and ab 8' Oughtred 8' cedar strip dinghy. Guides are adjustable.

Bob M

On Fri, Oct 2, 2020 at 1:54 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Sorry for the tardy reply. I've been under the weather and uninclined to
get my brain organixed enough to write... Better now.

I'm ashamed to admit that I've only had Whimsy out once since I got her.
That outing demonstrated that even though she is indeed light, she's
awkward to load and unload using an unmodified Quick-N-Easy roof rack on
the canopy of my 2006 Tacoma. The boat is 12' long and 4' wide, and
manhandling her risks odd muscle strains and back kinks for an out of
shape Ol' Coot. Alas, I've procrastinated about doing what's necessary
to set up the roof rack, and to rig up a little dolly to make moving
Whimsy around easier. Also making a good way to store her. Right now
she's inside Pickle; not an ideal situation for either boat..

Whimsy is indeed a Good Boat once in the water. She rows easily even
with the clubs I've got for oars. (When's Toledo Joe gonna show us how
to make good oars? <g>). I've only had her out in flat water, but I
suspect she'd do well in a chop. She tracks really, really well; perhaps
even to a fault for an oarsman who likes a lively, maneuverable boat,
but a great help to a poor rower like myself. <g>

We used the light Dacron. I haven't run into anything sharp yet, so I
can't say if that was a wise choice. If you're gonna be grounding on
sharp rocks and barnacles, sacrificing some lightness by uisng the 9 oz.
cloth might be worth it. Dave Gentry has used PL Premium polyurethane
construction adhesive as a filler coat on the Dacron for better
durability. Gentry's boats are heavier than Platt Monfort's, but simpler
to build. The Toledo Boathouse built a bunch of them when Andrew was in
charge.

http://gentrycustomboats.com/

There's a little Yaquina canoe (Gentry style construction) that was
built years ago at the Toledo Boathouse that's been knocked about --
though no barnacles -- in the boat livery and is still usable, though
getting a bit worn. Dacron covered SoF boats hold up darn good.

https://flic.kr/p/fE6ZpA

The Retired Old Geezers did a Good Job building Whimsy, but there's some
slack in some of the Kevlar reinforcement straps. That doesn't seem to
be causing any problems. Yet. <g> If you build a Geodesic Airolite boat,
be sure to leave tails on the Kevlar above the gunnels so you can
tighten the straps after you've shrunk the fabric. Cut the excess off
after you install the rubrails.

The frame is hard to paint by hand, because it's complex, with lots of
little surfaces and corners. The ROGs finally had the shipyard spray
paint Whimsy's. An oil finish that you can liberally slap on without
worrying about drips and runs might be the best choice if you don't have
a spray gun.

On 9/27/2020 7:56 AM, Ken P wrote:
> This is particularly for John K., but anybody else with relevant
> experience with SOF boats, please speak up!
> I'm thinking hard about this coming winter and the huge space in my shop
> since my best friend's Caledonia Yawl isn't in there any more. . .and
> I've noticed lately that my canoe-rowboat is getting heavier and heavier
> these days. . .so could I ask for a report on how the no longer brand
> new Classic 12 is doing?  First as regards handling on shore. . .is it
> really that light??  Then in the water. . .I don't doubt it rows really
> well on the flat, have you had it in any rougher water?  I don't recall,
> did you use the 9 ounce fabric or the original lighter material? 
>   Either way, have you had any damage yet (I don't like to look at the
> scratches on the bottom of my canoe. . .sigh)?  I guess I'm clumsy
> enough now that I let the boat ground at least lightly before clambering
> out these days, which, on the barnacles and cobbles beach where I
> launch. . .is only nice around high tide!
> Anyway, your boat is surely pretty enough, how is it working for you?
> Thanks for your great albums!


--
John <jkohnen@...>
It is a great art to saunter. (Henry David Thoreau)


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Re: The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

Brandon
 

I love these stories! People should chase their dreams even if there’s a chance they will turn into nightmares. Seems like every marina we stay at has at least a dozen folks who are constantly getting ready to leave on their “voyage around something” and they never cut the dock lines. Yea for anyone who gets that done. 

The dentist story reminds me of a ketch that Ed Monk Sr. designed for a dentist who served the small towns in southeastern Alaska. Nice boat. Had a dentist chair even. 

Brandon 




Re: The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

Josh
 

Brandon, that sounds a bit like me, read Dove and Maiden Voyage, Atkin, Herreshoff etc with big ideas of sailing around the world. Have moderated the dream to stuff I really will do. 


On Thu, Oct 8, 2020, 8:16 AM Brandon via groups.io <brandonfordus=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I wish them luck. Sailing around the world was my dream since I was 13 and read the account of Robin Lee Graham in National Geographic. It narrowed down over the years to just the parts of the Pacific with coconut trees. 

This story reminds me of an article in the Newport fish wrap. They made a big deal about a couple who had fixed up a ketch and were off to sail around the world. They left Newport and both the men got so sea sick they returned less than a day later and never untied the dock lines again. 

Sounds like this couple will at least make it to Mexico. Bon voyage my friends!

Brandon 
Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43





Re: The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

Stephen Miller
 

I have a similar story.  My childhood dentist (pal of my dad's) spent many years building a sailboat in his back yard.  Used a crane to lift it up over the house to truck it down to the river.  Finished fitting her out, sold his practice then prepared to fulfill his life's dream of sailing the south pacific.   

His wife refused to go.  He left without her.  Ended up working as a traveling dentist for some of the island nations governments.  They paid his expenses.  Had a dental clinic on the boat and usually sailed with a cute young assistant or two.  He flew home for Christmas.  

Always thought he lived the perfect life in retirement.  

Steve Miller

On Thu, Oct 8, 2020, 1:34 PM Richard Green <chaos5@...> wrote:
Brandon, I’m reminded of a couple who were in the Oregonian 25 years ago or so.  Full page send off in the interest section.  They spent ten years building the boat and preparing.  Sailed to San Francisco and she hated it so they sold the boat and flew everywhere they’d wanted to sail to.  

My dream now is to get the 13’ Livingston in my driveway fully repaired, primed, painted and ready for Hagg Lake!  The far horizon, no boundaries….!!!  Using Citristrip to strip the bad paint off the bottom.  Some holes filled, keels looked like the boat had fallen off the trailer on the freeway at seventy mph.  But I like the size, it’s scarce and the trailer, albeit painted, is excellent and I have a 3.5 Tohatsu to drive it around.  Stable enough even for a geezer.



Rich

On Oct 8, 2020, at 8:16 AM, Brandon via groups.io <brandonfordus@...> wrote:

I wish them luck. Sailing around the world was my dream since I was 13 and read the account of Robin Lee Graham in National Geographic. It narrowed down over the years to just the parts of the Pacific with coconut trees. 

This story reminds me of an article in the Newport fish wrap. They made a big deal about a couple who had fixed up a ketch and were off to sail around the world. They left Newport and both the men got so sea sick they returned less than a day later and never untied the dock lines again. 

Sounds like this couple will at least make it to Mexico. Bon voyage my friends!

Brandon 
Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43






Re: The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

Richard Green
 

Brandon, I’m reminded of a couple who were in the Oregonian 25 years ago or so.  Full page send off in the interest section.  They spent ten years building the boat and preparing.  Sailed to San Francisco and she hated it so they sold the boat and flew everywhere they’d wanted to sail to.  

My dream now is to get the 13’ Livingston in my driveway fully repaired, primed, painted and ready for Hagg Lake!  The far horizon, no boundaries….!!!  Using Citristrip to strip the bad paint off the bottom.  Some holes filled, keels looked like the boat had fallen off the trailer on the freeway at seventy mph.  But I like the size, it’s scarce and the trailer, albeit painted, is excellent and I have a 3.5 Tohatsu to drive it around.  Stable enough even for a geezer.



Rich

On Oct 8, 2020, at 8:16 AM, Brandon via groups.io <brandonfordus@...> wrote:

I wish them luck. Sailing around the world was my dream since I was 13 and read the account of Robin Lee Graham in National Geographic. It narrowed down over the years to just the parts of the Pacific with coconut trees. 

This story reminds me of an article in the Newport fish wrap. They made a big deal about a couple who had fixed up a ketch and were off to sail around the world. They left Newport and both the men got so sea sick they returned less than a day later and never untied the dock lines again. 

Sounds like this couple will at least make it to Mexico. Bon voyage my friends!

Brandon 
Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43






Re: The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

Brandon
 

I wish them luck. Sailing around the world was my dream since I was 13 and read the account of Robin Lee Graham in National Geographic. It narrowed down over the years to just the parts of the Pacific with coconut trees. 

This story reminds me of an article in the Newport fish wrap. They made a big deal about a couple who had fixed up a ketch and were off to sail around the world. They left Newport and both the men got so sea sick they returned less than a day later and never untied the dock lines again. 

Sounds like this couple will at least make it to Mexico. Bon voyage my friends!

Brandon 
Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43





The Safest Place to Be duirng a Pandemic

 

The middle of an ocean...

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3nvcj97

or

https://www.opb.org/article/2020/10/05/safest-place-may-be-at-sea-say-portlanders-who-have-cast-off-on-global-circumnavigation/

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
There is wisdom in turning as often as possible from the familiar to the unfamiliar: it keeps the mind nimble, it kills prejudice, and it fosters humor. (George Santayana)


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Cartopping boats

dan mulholland
 

Concerning John's challenge,  I've been dealing with this, too.  For the small, lightweight rowboat I use, I set up a roller that has a base that slides into the slot between the liftgate and roof, so the boat could be "rolled" on and off.  Even with this, though, there is still a need to catch and roll the boat over when unloading.  The main problem was/is that strapping the boat down, even with carpet padding, scratched off the varnish on the rub rails, and, given the wood used, this  is a problem- it mildews to black and has to be "oxycleaned" and so on to refinish. 

So, I pulled the Bolger cartopper off a trailer (see a trend here?) and put the rowboat on it.  It seems silly to use a comparatively heavy trailer to haul almost no weight, but it is so much easier.   I set up hold downs on the boat so there are no straps hitting varnish.  The trailer never goes in the water, either; just pull it off the trailer to launch, and lift the bow on and pull it out when retrieving. I built a small cover structure for it ( covered with tarps, of course), so I can roll the trailer and boat into the mini garage easily. 

Dan



Re: Calling Seth Bloombaum

Tom Sorensen
 

Found him!

On Oct 5, 2020, at 12:10 PM, Tom Sorensen via groups.io <tdsoren=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Anybody have contact info for Seth Bloombaum? I need to get in contact with him for a bill of sale on the Pelican I bought @ 5 years ago.

Tom sorensen
503-936-1970
On Oct 2, 2020, at 1:54 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

Sorry for the tardy reply. I've been under the weather and uninclined to get my brain organixed enough to write... Better now.

I'm ashamed to admit that I've only had Whimsy out once since I got her. That outing demonstrated that even though she is indeed light, she's awkward to load and unload using an unmodified Quick-N-Easy roof rack on the canopy of my 2006 Tacoma. The boat is 12' long and 4' wide, and manhandling her risks odd muscle strains and back kinks for an out of shape Ol' Coot. Alas, I've procrastinated about doing what's necessary to set up the roof rack, and to rig up a little dolly to make moving Whimsy around easier. Also making a good way to store her. Right now she's inside Pickle; not an ideal situation for either boat..

Whimsy is indeed a Good Boat once in the water. She rows easily even with the clubs I've got for oars. (When's Toledo Joe gonna show us how to make good oars? <g>). I've only had her out in flat water, but I suspect she'd do well in a chop. She tracks really, really well; perhaps even to a fault for an oarsman who likes a lively, maneuverable boat, but a great help to a poor rower like myself. <g>

We used the light Dacron. I haven't run into anything sharp yet, so I can't say if that was a wise choice. If you're gonna be grounding on sharp rocks and barnacles, sacrificing some lightness by uisng the 9 oz. cloth might be worth it. Dave Gentry has used PL Premium polyurethane construction adhesive as a filler coat on the Dacron for better durability. Gentry's boats are heavier than Platt Monfort's, but simpler to build. The Toledo Boathouse built a bunch of them when Andrew was in charge.

http://gentrycustomboats.com/

There's a little Yaquina canoe (Gentry style construction) that was built years ago at the Toledo Boathouse that's been knocked about -- though no barnacles -- in the boat livery and is still usable, though getting a bit worn. Dacron covered SoF boats hold up darn good.

https://flic.kr/p/fE6ZpA

The Retired Old Geezers did a Good Job building Whimsy, but there's some slack in some of the Kevlar reinforcement straps. That doesn't seem to be causing any problems. Yet. <g> If you build a Geodesic Airolite boat, be sure to leave tails on the Kevlar above the gunnels so you can tighten the straps after you've shrunk the fabric. Cut the excess off after you install the rubrails.

The frame is hard to paint by hand, because it's complex, with lots of little surfaces and corners. The ROGs finally had the shipyard spray paint Whimsy's. An oil finish that you can liberally slap on without worrying about drips and runs might be the best choice if you don't have a spray gun.

On 9/27/2020 7:56 AM, Ken P wrote:
This is particularly for John K., but anybody else with relevant experience with SOF boats, please speak up!
I'm thinking hard about this coming winter and the huge space in my shop since my best friend's Caledonia Yawl isn't in there any more. . .and I've noticed lately that my canoe-rowboat is getting heavier and heavier these days. . .so could I ask for a report on how the no longer brand new Classic 12 is doing? First as regards handling on shore. . .is it really that light?? Then in the water. . .I don't doubt it rows really well on the flat, have you had it in any rougher water? I don't recall, did you use the 9 ounce fabric or the original lighter material? Either way, have you had any damage yet (I don't like to look at the scratches on the bottom of my canoe. . .sigh)? I guess I'm clumsy enough now that I let the boat ground at least lightly before clambering out these days, which, on the barnacles and cobbles beach where I launch. . .is only nice around high tide!
Anyway, your boat is surely pretty enough, how is it working for you?
Thanks for your great albums!

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
It is a great art to saunter. (Henry David Thoreau)


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Re: John's Classic 12

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Ken, that's a great idea, thanks for sharing.
I am a strong and fairly young coot, 34, 200lbs, and my back is almost always good. But even so there are days I really don't want to lift even my 50lb glass kayaks onto the roof of my nice low corolla.
There are times I'm more in the mood for a gentle walk, but would prefer to paddle. I know several older women who really can't handle any of the boats that are widely available, since they are small and light boned. I sympathise with them and the lack of availability of good solutions. Thanks for sharing this one.
I often think about how wider availability of SOF technology could help too.
-Jove

On Tue, Oct 6, 2020 at 8:11 AM Ken Preston <kenpreston46@...> wrote:
Hello John,and thanks very much for your input.  I particularly sympathize with your trouble getting even a light if very awkward load up on top of a vehicle.  My no-longer quite new strip canoe tried to eat me alive when I approached my pickup rack with it.  I decided I wasn't ever going to use the boat if I had to go through that any more (I essentially always go alone, so can't believably count on help loading and unloading, especially for frequent but short trips).  I bought a "truck bed extender" which looks like it ought to be illegal but works really well.  It goes into a 2" trailer hitch receiver and is rated at 300 pounds load. . .with a 65 pound canoe, I'm well within the load limits and the boat is always at or below waist level.  It's also sticking something like 8 feet behind the truck. . .so I got the biggest brightest fluorescent orange flag I could find and fly it from the stern on the road.  So far no problems with the police. . .and I'm getting a lot of time on the water.  I've made a series of wheel sets for various boats, and that of course is essential. . .put wheels under one end of the boat and only have to carry the other end yourself.  The wheels are 12" lawnmower wheels that take a 1/2" rod for an axle, but I have my eyes open for a set of "sand wheels". . .we shall see.  What I have is working!
Thanks again,
Ken


Re: John's Classic 12

Ken Preston
 

Hello John,and thanks very much for your input.  I particularly sympathize with your trouble getting even a light if very awkward load up on top of a vehicle.  My no-longer quite new strip canoe tried to eat me alive when I approached my pickup rack with it.  I decided I wasn't ever going to use the boat if I had to go through that any more (I essentially always go alone, so can't believably count on help loading and unloading, especially for frequent but short trips).  I bought a "truck bed extender" which looks like it ought to be illegal but works really well.  It goes into a 2" trailer hitch receiver and is rated at 300 pounds load. . .with a 65 pound canoe, I'm well within the load limits and the boat is always at or below waist level.  It's also sticking something like 8 feet behind the truck. . .so I got the biggest brightest fluorescent orange flag I could find and fly it from the stern on the road.  So far no problems with the police. . .and I'm getting a lot of time on the water.  I've made a series of wheel sets for various boats, and that of course is essential. . .put wheels under one end of the boat and only have to carry the other end yourself.  The wheels are 12" lawnmower wheels that take a 1/2" rod for an axle, but I have my eyes open for a set of "sand wheels". . .we shall see.  What I have is working!
Thanks again,
Ken


Re: Circumnavigation around Sauvie Island

David Birch
 

On Monday, October 5, 2020, 5:38 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

John finally did get Earl's photos online:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRdsmdL

I had to make some guesses in some of the descriptions. I hope Earl sets
me straight. <g>

On 10/3/2020 11:56 AM, Earl wrote:
> Hi Elaine,
> John will post the pics soon, and I’ll provide a narrative eventually🌝⛵️⚓️
> Do you still want your chart? It’s waiting on my desk.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
I cannot endure to waste anything as precious as autumn sunshine by
staying in the house. (Nathaniel Hawthorne)

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Re: Circumnavigation around Sauvie Island

 

John finally did get Earl's photos online:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRdsmdL

I had to make some guesses in some of the descriptions. I hope Earl sets me straight. <g>

On 10/3/2020 11:56 AM, Earl wrote:
Hi Elaine,
John will post the pics soon, and I’ll provide a narrative eventually🌝⛵️⚓️
Do you still want your chart? It’s waiting on my desk.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I cannot endure to waste anything as precious as autumn sunshine by staying in the house. (Nathaniel Hawthorne)
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Calling Seth Bloombaum

Tom Sorensen
 

Anybody have contact info for Seth Bloombaum? I need to get in contact with him for a bill of sale on the Pelican I bought @ 5 years ago.

Tom sorensen
503-936-1970

On Oct 2, 2020, at 1:54 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

Sorry for the tardy reply. I've been under the weather and uninclined to get my brain organixed enough to write... Better now.

I'm ashamed to admit that I've only had Whimsy out once since I got her. That outing demonstrated that even though she is indeed light, she's awkward to load and unload using an unmodified Quick-N-Easy roof rack on the canopy of my 2006 Tacoma. The boat is 12' long and 4' wide, and manhandling her risks odd muscle strains and back kinks for an out of shape Ol' Coot. Alas, I've procrastinated about doing what's necessary to set up the roof rack, and to rig up a little dolly to make moving Whimsy around easier. Also making a good way to store her. Right now she's inside Pickle; not an ideal situation for either boat..

Whimsy is indeed a Good Boat once in the water. She rows easily even with the clubs I've got for oars. (When's Toledo Joe gonna show us how to make good oars? <g>). I've only had her out in flat water, but I suspect she'd do well in a chop. She tracks really, really well; perhaps even to a fault for an oarsman who likes a lively, maneuverable boat, but a great help to a poor rower like myself. <g>

We used the light Dacron. I haven't run into anything sharp yet, so I can't say if that was a wise choice. If you're gonna be grounding on sharp rocks and barnacles, sacrificing some lightness by uisng the 9 oz. cloth might be worth it. Dave Gentry has used PL Premium polyurethane construction adhesive as a filler coat on the Dacron for better durability. Gentry's boats are heavier than Platt Monfort's, but simpler to build. The Toledo Boathouse built a bunch of them when Andrew was in charge.

http://gentrycustomboats.com/

There's a little Yaquina canoe (Gentry style construction) that was built years ago at the Toledo Boathouse that's been knocked about -- though no barnacles -- in the boat livery and is still usable, though getting a bit worn. Dacron covered SoF boats hold up darn good.

https://flic.kr/p/fE6ZpA

The Retired Old Geezers did a Good Job building Whimsy, but there's some slack in some of the Kevlar reinforcement straps. That doesn't seem to be causing any problems. Yet. <g> If you build a Geodesic Airolite boat, be sure to leave tails on the Kevlar above the gunnels so you can tighten the straps after you've shrunk the fabric. Cut the excess off after you install the rubrails.

The frame is hard to paint by hand, because it's complex, with lots of little surfaces and corners. The ROGs finally had the shipyard spray paint Whimsy's. An oil finish that you can liberally slap on without worrying about drips and runs might be the best choice if you don't have a spray gun.

On 9/27/2020 7:56 AM, Ken P wrote:
This is particularly for John K., but anybody else with relevant experience with SOF boats, please speak up!
I'm thinking hard about this coming winter and the huge space in my shop since my best friend's Caledonia Yawl isn't in there any more. . .and I've noticed lately that my canoe-rowboat is getting heavier and heavier these days. . .so could I ask for a report on how the no longer brand new Classic 12 is doing? First as regards handling on shore. . .is it really that light?? Then in the water. . .I don't doubt it rows really well on the flat, have you had it in any rougher water? I don't recall, did you use the 9 ounce fabric or the original lighter material? Either way, have you had any damage yet (I don't like to look at the scratches on the bottom of my canoe. . .sigh)? I guess I'm clumsy enough now that I let the boat ground at least lightly before clambering out these days, which, on the barnacles and cobbles beach where I launch. . .is only nice around high tide!
Anyway, your boat is surely pretty enough, how is it working for you?
Thanks for your great albums!

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
It is a great art to saunter. (Henry David Thoreau)


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Re: Circumnavigation around Sauvie Island

elaineginader
 

Thank you, and yes I still want it. I'll look up your address if I can find it and send you the payment and some extra if you are willing to mail it to me.


On Sat, Oct 3, 2020, 11:56 AM cherrill boissonou <cboissonou@...> wrote:
Hi Elaine,
John will post the pics soon, and I’ll provide a narrative eventually🌝⛵️⚓️
Do you still want your chart? It’s waiting on my desk.
Earl


On Oct 2, 2020, at 8:20 PM, elaineginader <elaineginader@...> wrote:

Thanks everyone for the news of your trips. Sorry I wasn't able to make it. I can't wait to see some of the pictures. What do you think of adding this to the Coots calendar for next year.

Elaine

On Fri, Oct 2, 2020, 7:56 PM Myles Twete <matwete@...> wrote:

Thanks Mark-

I was surprised (and saddened) not to see you at Sand Island.

Val and I stuck with the script, so we landed at Coon Island Sunday late and stayed the night.  There were at least 3 boats at the East docks and 3 (including ours) on the West, so  I don’t understand how you could have seen no boats unless it was before 4pm or so.  And if that were the case, you’d have passed us up going upstream.  There were no boats before we got to the West docks, then we and 2 other boats arrived almost simultaneously.  But the East docks had at least 3 when we walked across the island.

Regardless…

 

Yeah, Corky Miller has moored “Penumbra” at the private docks maybe 3 miles upstream of Coon Island now for a couple years I think.  We saw it as we went by on Monday and she looked pretty good from a distance J.  I should have reached out to Corky before the trip…

 

Anyway, again, per script, we went upstream on Monday and then, not having anyone tagging along or meeting us, we dropped anchor by ourselves that night.

 

For me, I didn’t know who we’d meet and didn’t have phone#s, so it was all a surprise journey J.

 

-MT

 

From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Neuhaus
Sent: Friday, October 2, 2020 6:12 PM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Circumnavigation around Sauvie Island

 

Hi gang,

On Friday, October 2, 2020, Myles Twete <matwete@...> wrote:

 

We had a good 3 days and nights circumnavigating Sauvies Island.

 

I couldn't get away on Saturday for a couple of reasons, but figured to meet up at Coon Island  sometime on Sunday.  Late Saturday, Earl called and left a voice mail that said he, Bo, and Dan were at Sand Island and I should call him. I sent him a text with my plans, as his voice mail was full.

 

Sunday, I loaded my boat and headed for Coon Island, which had empty docks all around. Kept heading north to intercept the fleet.  Got just past Scappoose Bay entrance and saw nobody, so called Earl.  Imagine my surprise when he said he and Bo were heading for Cathlamet!  Now, it's true I have a zooming boat, but I wasn't  about to try to run him down.  

 

He had told me that Myles had re-charged in St. Helens and was heading home.  So, I turned around and went home.  Didn't feel comfortable spending the night alone at Coon Island. I've seen a  few too many iffy boats along the channel. Too bad I didn't know Myles' plan to complete the circle.

 

Myles, I did meet up with your sister ship which used to be at Kadow's and we chatted a few minutes while underway.  Did you cross paths with them?

 

A day or two later, I drove over to the PYC inlet on Sauvie, and drove the perimeter road back.  So, I guess I sorta circumnavigated the island. 😀

 

Mark

 


Re: Circumnavigation around Sauvie Island

cherrill boissonou
 

Hi Elaine,
John will post the pics soon, and I’ll provide a narrative eventually🌝⛵️⚓️
Do you still want your chart? It’s waiting on my desk.
Earl


On Oct 2, 2020, at 8:20 PM, elaineginader <elaineginader@...> wrote:

Thanks everyone for the news of your trips. Sorry I wasn't able to make it. I can't wait to see some of the pictures. What do you think of adding this to the Coots calendar for next year.

Elaine

On Fri, Oct 2, 2020, 7:56 PM Myles Twete <matwete@...> wrote:

Thanks Mark-

I was surprised (and saddened) not to see you at Sand Island.

Val and I stuck with the script, so we landed at Coon Island Sunday late and stayed the night.  There were at least 3 boats at the East docks and 3 (including ours) on the West, so  I don’t understand how you could have seen no boats unless it was before 4pm or so.  And if that were the case, you’d have passed us up going upstream.  There were no boats before we got to the West docks, then we and 2 other boats arrived almost simultaneously.  But the East docks had at least 3 when we walked across the island.

Regardless…

 

Yeah, Corky Miller has moored “Penumbra” at the private docks maybe 3 miles upstream of Coon Island now for a couple years I think.  We saw it as we went by on Monday and she looked pretty good from a distance J.  I should have reached out to Corky before the trip…

 

Anyway, again, per script, we went upstream on Monday and then, not having anyone tagging along or meeting us, we dropped anchor by ourselves that night.

 

For me, I didn’t know who we’d meet and didn’t have phone#s, so it was all a surprise journey J.

 

-MT

 

From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Neuhaus
Sent: Friday, October 2, 2020 6:12 PM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Circumnavigation around Sauvie Island

 

Hi gang,

On Friday, October 2, 2020, Myles Twete <matwete@...> wrote:

 

We had a good 3 days and nights circumnavigating Sauvies Island.

 

I couldn't get away on Saturday for a couple of reasons, but figured to meet up at Coon Island  sometime on Sunday.  Late Saturday, Earl called and left a voice mail that said he, Bo, and Dan were at Sand Island and I should call him. I sent him a text with my plans, as his voice mail was full.

 

Sunday, I loaded my boat and headed for Coon Island, which had empty docks all around. Kept heading north to intercept the fleet.  Got just past Scappoose Bay entrance and saw nobody, so called Earl.  Imagine my surprise when he said he and Bo were heading for Cathlamet!  Now, it's true I have a zooming boat, but I wasn't  about to try to run him down.  

 

He had told me that Myles had re-charged in St. Helens and was heading home.  So, I turned around and went home.  Didn't feel comfortable spending the night alone at Coon Island. I've seen a  few too many iffy boats along the channel. Too bad I didn't know Myles' plan to complete the circle.

 

Myles, I did meet up with your sister ship which used to be at Kadow's and we chatted a few minutes while underway.  Did you cross paths with them?

 

A day or two later, I drove over to the PYC inlet on Sauvie, and drove the perimeter road back.  So, I guess I sorta circumnavigated the island. 😀

 

Mark

 

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