Date   

Last Call for Saturday Coot Lunch and Voyage Planning Session

 

Please let us know if you're planning on coming to the lunch and Sauvie's Island Circumnavigation planning session this Saturday, at 1:00, at Earl's place north of Corvallis. Cherrill will be making lunch, so she needs to know how much food to make.

If you don't know how to find Earl's, let me know and I'll send you directions.

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Things don't improve with age. Look at your truck. Look at your roof. Look in the mirror! (Red Green)


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Re: Table Saw Blues --- Burnt out motor !!

 

You've got the experience to back up your recommendation for the higher voltage portable drills and drivers for working hard all day, Case, but Chuck the Duck was right about the little ones for us amateur boatbuiders and fiddlers. The 12 volt drills and drivers aren't just more bang for the buck, they're smaller and less clumsy. Better for working in tight places, and handier all around.

Where more battery power would be useful is for a battery portable circular saw. I'm sure all of us would love a circular saw that didn't have a cord to drag around (and cut <g>) and the power to zip through 2x4s. The little 12 volt trim saw I've got really isn't much good for anything except cutting trim and thin plywood. Alas, I've got two good corded circular saws, and a Bosch jigsaw. <sigh> <g>

An electric chainsaw is sure great! I seldom use a chainsaw, so I ditched the last gas one and bought a corded electric saw. No worrying about whether it will start after sitting for months, no having to keep 2-stroke mix on hand, a LOT less noise. :o) That was years ago; I might buy a battery chainsaw if I needed to today. This year I gave up on the gas weedeater and got a battery weed whacker. It's a cheapo Black & Decker (parent company of Dewalt!) but I don't use it often, so I hope it'll be OK. Works great so far, and the battery lasts longer than I want to run it.

Battery powered tools have sure come a long way in recent years! :o)

On 9/3/2020 2:25 PM, Case wrote:
I had all Makita for a long time. The only reason I went with desalt was because of the table saw and chop saw. Both of which are plenty for the type of stuff we all do. If I was still doing finish carpentry for a living I’d use these in a heart beat.
This past year I rounded out my battery operated equipment with desalts weed eater, leaf blower, and 16” chainsaw. These all use the same batteries as the table and chop saws.
All of which I’ve been throughly impressed with. When I’m exploring back roads or camping the chain saw is always me. There was a ton of blow down last winter and without it we would’ve not got far many trips.
> As for the 12v being enough, for occasional users they are the best
bang for the buck. If you’re running them all day long though GH the 20v is a must.
When I was in Hawaii working I was loaned a 12v Makita set to use. Didn’t cut it. I was changing batteries three times as much as the guys with 20v. So I bought the 20v drill and impact set. Mailed back the drill set, a hammer, a tape and a tool belt. Only souvenirs I brought back, lol!
Anyways the Dewalt battery tools are the real deal and I’d have no problem using them if I was still building.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The cabin of a small yacht is truly a wonderful thing; not only will it shelter you from a tempest, but from the other troubles in life, it is a safe retreat. (L. Francis Herreshoff)


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Re: Table Saw Blues --- Burnt out motor !!

Case Turner
 

I had all Makita for a long time. The only reason I went with desalt was because of the table saw and chop saw. Both of which are plenty for the type of stuff we all do. If I was still doing finish carpentry for a living I’d use these in a heart beat.

This past year I rounded out my battery operated equipment with desalts weed eater, leaf blower, and 16” chainsaw. These all use the same batteries as the table and chop saws.

All of which I’ve been throughly impressed with. When I’m exploring back roads or camping the chain saw is always me. There was a ton of blow down last winter and without it we would’ve not got far many trips.

As for the 12v being enough, for occasional users they are the best bang for the buck. If you’re running them all day long though GH the 20v is a must.

When I was in Hawaii working I was loaned a 12v Makita set to use. Didn’t cut it. I was changing batteries three times as much as the guys with 20v. So I bought the 20v drill and impact set. Mailed back the drill set, a hammer, a tape and a tool belt. Only souvenirs I brought back, lol!

Anyways the Dewalt battery tools are the real deal and I’d have no problem using them if I was still building.

Case

Sent from not here

On Sep 3, 2020, at 2:07 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

I had no idea useful battery table saws existed:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3ntfrkr

But I'm lucky enough to have a place to plug in a saw.

I sure do love cordless drills and impact drivers, though. :o) Chuck the Duck told me that there was no reason to get anything bigger than the 12 volt (nominal) ones, and he was right. Plenty of power and handier than the bigger ones. I think the big ones are marketed towards the same sort of men who drive huge pickups and put great big motors on their boats. <g> Chuck was also right that once I tried on of the impact drivers I'd fall in love with it. ;o) I went with a Makita set, and haven't been sorry. The same batteries power my mini-vac and a little bitty circular saw.

On 9/2/2020 7:43 PM, Case wrote:
When we sold our last house that had a shop I sold all my big floor saws.
I now have all Deealt battery operated gear. Chop saw, table saw, drills, etc.
Really like all of them.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I'll believe anything, no matter how wild and ridiculous, if there is evidence for it. The wilder and more ridiculous something is, however, the firmer and more solid the evidence will have to be. (Isaac Asimov)


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--
Dirt


Re: Table saw notes.

 

Carson's does all kinds of sharpening. I go there most often to get a lawnmower blade sharpened.

On 9/3/2020 12:01 PM, Jove wrote:
I've not used Carson saw yet,
The mexican food cart there is indeed good, I've eaten there several times.

If a carbide blade is from a good manufacturer it might be worth having
its bad teeth replaced. I go to Carson's saw shop, on Blair between 6th
and 7th in Eugene, for my sharpening needs. They go all ga-ga over my
old Freud blade when I bring it in, but they reluctantly replaced some
teeth on a Grizzly blade after I did the math and concluded that it was
enough cheaper to fix the cheapo blade instead of buying another.
https://www.carsonsawshop.com/
They say that the Mexican food stand parked out front is real good too,
but I haven't tried them yet...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. (Benjamin Franklin)
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Re: Thanks Coots, getting started on "stuff"

 

Tuffy ghosts along pretty good in almost imperceptible breezes, despite having a dead motor like one of Cal's bolted to the side of her keel. At such low speed surface friction is just about all of the drag, there's no turbulence from the motor, propeller and struts. That's probably the case up to maybe about 2 mph (I could check, but I'm lazy), so running Cal's boat on only one of its motors should win out at slow speeds. Things get more interesting when we go a little faster... <g>

Cal can turn off one of the motors, but there's no way to control their speeds separately. It's well known that running an electric motor very slowly when a boat is sailing reduces drag significantly.

It'll be fun to do some experimenting with Surprise. :o)

On 9/3/2020 10:33 AM, Myles T wrote:
It would be an interesting experiment to compare running one vs two motors driving the boat at a given speed. It's likely a wash in terms of loss in the controller and given near identical prop characteristics between the two, you're talking about doubling the prop loading in the 1-motor scenario compared to 2. At low loads (and speeds), that might not amount to much of an efficiency reduction to drive with just 1 prop, and might even result in the prop operating closer to its higher efficiency zone (Gerr's prop manual might inform here). But as the boat drag goes up with the square of the speed, at the higher speeds, having the dual props and dual motors sharing the load likely wins out big time assuming we're talking about speeds where the loading nears the high end of the motor's rating. And motor torque via motor current delivers that force.
Motor heat loss (2mtrs) ~ 2 * k2 * Rmtr * (Fdrag/2)^2
= k2 * (Rmtr * Fdrag ^ 2) / 2
Motor heat loss (1mtr) ~ k1* Rmtr * Fdrag ^ 2
Assuming k1 ~ k2 (conversion losses in controller, prop loading, etc. are near same), we should expect the single-motor configuration to have about 2-times the heat loss as for the 2-motor case.
So even if prop efficiency for the 1- or 2-motor scenario were identical (unlikely) at the high speeds, we should expect twice the heat loss.
Now, how much of the total power to the controller(s) is lost to motor heat due to motor current? It's a lot, but the efficiency of the propeller, combined with the drivetrain is the shortest stick---this could be as high as 70% at speed or as low as 50-55%. This, compared to a difference between 90% vs 80% efficiency for a lightly, vs highly loaded motor. Controller efficiency is likely in the 95% zone. Cable and battery losses also factor in.
Add to this, dragging an undriven prop thru the water---best to drive that prop with just the right amount of power that its current draw just starts to increase. At that point, it is presenting minimal drag.
Bottom line: Prop efficiency is paramount. Loading the prop to the point that its operating point moves out of the higher efficiency zones quickly defeats other gains you might attain elsewhere (e.g. by driving with just 1 motor). Add to this, I^2R losses in the motor and battery/cabling quickly conspire against you. But it all depends on the loading. At low speeds and loads, the single prop drive likely wins out. As speed and load increases, single prop loses.
Still, let the data speak :-) .

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Assistance given to the weak makes the one who gives it strong. (Booker T. Washington)
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Re: Table Saw Blues --- Burnt out motor !!

 

I had no idea useful battery table saws existed:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3ntfrkr

But I'm lucky enough to have a place to plug in a saw.

I sure do love cordless drills and impact drivers, though. :o) Chuck the Duck told me that there was no reason to get anything bigger than the 12 volt (nominal) ones, and he was right. Plenty of power and handier than the bigger ones. I think the big ones are marketed towards the same sort of men who drive huge pickups and put great big motors on their boats. <g> Chuck was also right that once I tried on of the impact drivers I'd fall in love with it. ;o) I went with a Makita set, and haven't been sorry. The same batteries power my mini-vac and a little bitty circular saw.

On 9/2/2020 7:43 PM, Case wrote:
When we sold our last house that had a shop I sold all my big floor saws.
I now have all Deealt battery operated gear. Chop saw, table saw, drills, etc.
Really like all of them.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I'll believe anything, no matter how wild and ridiculous, if there is evidence for it. The wilder and more ridiculous something is, however, the firmer and more solid the evidence will have to be. (Isaac Asimov)
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Re: Table saw notes.

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

I've not used Carson saw yet,
The mexican food cart there is indeed good, I've eaten there several times.
-Jove


On Wed, Sep 2, 2020 at 11:04 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
If a carbide blade is from a good manufacturer it might be worth having
its bad teeth replaced. I go to Carson's saw shop, on Blair between 6th
and 7th in Eugene, for my sharpening needs. They go all ga-ga over my
old Freud blade when I bring it in, but they reluctantly replaced some
teeth on a Grizzly blade after I did the math and concluded that it was
enough cheaper to fix the cheapo blade instead of buying another.

https://www.carsonsawshop.com/

They say that the Mexican food stand parked out front is real good too,
but I haven't tried them yet...

On 9/2/2020 9:24 AM, Electri-Cal wrote:
> ...
> I scrapped 3 older saw blades, chipped teeth, gone carbide ,
> hitting ss screws, a great help, maybe other coots might take a
> dedicated look at one of our most used tools, while its warm enough to
> enjoy the task.  At least a new red Diablo combo saw might help the
> cutting process??
> ...

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Any fool can make a rule, and any fool will mind it. (Henry David Thoreau)


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Re: Thanks Coots, getting started on "stuff"

Myles Twete
 

It would be an interesting experiment to compare running one vs two motors driving the boat at a given speed. It's likely a wash in terms of loss in the controller and given near identical prop characteristics between the two, you're talking about doubling the prop loading in the 1-motor scenario compared to 2. At low loads (and speeds), that might not amount to much of an efficiency reduction to drive with just 1 prop, and might even result in the prop operating closer to its higher efficiency zone (Gerr's prop manual might inform here). But as the boat drag goes up with the square of the speed, at the higher speeds, having the dual props and dual motors sharing the load likely wins out big time assuming we're talking about speeds where the loading nears the high end of the motor's rating. And motor torque via motor current delivers that force.

Motor heat loss (2mtrs) ~ 2 * k2 * Rmtr * (Fdrag/2)^2
= k2 * (Rmtr * Fdrag ^ 2) / 2

Motor heat loss (1mtr) ~ k1* Rmtr * Fdrag ^ 2

Assuming k1 ~ k2 (conversion losses in controller, prop loading, etc. are near same), we should expect the single-motor configuration to have about 2-times the heat loss as for the 2-motor case.

So even if prop efficiency for the 1- or 2-motor scenario were identical (unlikely) at the high speeds, we should expect twice the heat loss.

Now, how much of the total power to the controller(s) is lost to motor heat due to motor current? It's a lot, but the efficiency of the propeller, combined with the drivetrain is the shortest stick---this could be as high as 70% at speed or as low as 50-55%. This, compared to a difference between 90% vs 80% efficiency for a lightly, vs highly loaded motor. Controller efficiency is likely in the 95% zone. Cable and battery losses also factor in.

Add to this, dragging an undriven prop thru the water---best to drive that prop with just the right amount of power that its current draw just starts to increase. At that point, it is presenting minimal drag.

Bottom line: Prop efficiency is paramount. Loading the prop to the point that its operating point moves out of the higher efficiency zones quickly defeats other gains you might attain elsewhere (e.g. by driving with just 1 motor). Add to this, I^2R losses in the motor and battery/cabling quickly conspire against you. But it all depends on the loading. At low speeds and loads, the single prop drive likely wins out. As speed and load increases, single prop loses.

Still, let the data speak :-) .

-MylesT

-----Original Message-----
From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Kohnen
Sent: Wednesday, September 2, 2020 10:55 PM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Thanks Coots, getting started on "stuff"

I visited Cal today. His ammeter was hooked up somehow so it measured the current going to the motors, at least, but he was using a 200 amp shunt for a 100 amp gauge. which I now know isn't kosher. We moved the shunt to the common ground and replaced the shunt with a 100 amp one Cal had lying around. Maybe even the one that originally came with the gauge. <g> He should be getting more accurate and complete current readings now -- if the shunt's mV rating matches the gauge -- but we can't tell until we get the boat in the water, and Cal bunged up his knee so that'll be later, after he gets it rested up.

The dial ammeter Cal's been using isn't very precise. It has a range up to 100 amps, and the swing of the needle is only about 90 degrees. We really should keep trying to talk him into getting a digital gauge so he can keep better track of the current draw under different conditions.
Like trying different propellers.

Cal's idea about switching off one motor to save juice is an interesting one to ponder while sitting in our armchairs. Since he started dreaming up Surprise I thought Cal only needed one of the 80 lb. motors for her.
But now he's got two bolted to her bottom. Let's say he's cruising along with both motors at 3 mph. the switches one off and "throttles" up the other until he's going 3 mph again. Will he use less juice? The motors have a fairly efficient pulse width modulated speed control, so not much juice is wasted when running both motors at a reduced speed. If he switches off one motor it's still there under the boat with its propeller free wheeling causing drag. Two motors running slow, or one motor running harder and dragging a dead motor. Which will give longer range? If we can rig up a more precise ammeter in Surprise we can have fun doing some experimenting. :o)

I looked at the documentation that came with Cal's motors. Their instructions for installing them are probably OK, but I was looking for specifications. In vain. <sigh> But I did find something interesting.
They said that the rule of thumb for current draw for their 12 volt motors is 1 amp per pound of thrust, but the rule of thumb for 24 volt motors is 3/4 amp per pound of thrust! I wonder whty it isn't just half the draw of the 12 volt jobs, as you'd expect... So Tuffy;s 50ish amp draw at full chat isn't above her rating. Cal's motors could draw 120 amps at full power,


On 9/2/2020 7:56 AM, Electri-Cal wrote:
...
When Myles Swift and I at the very first trial used my 40 lb clamp on
Minn Kota at Dexter, we had a great time. Same at first Fern Ridge
trip, clamp on 40 lb. -- big ol' stick handle up in the air, no other
power needed. So, back to the beginning, using one 80 lb., like the
one on John Kohnens sail boat, coupled to 4 series 27's and the "close
"enough for now" gauges ought to run for quite a while.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A strong nation, like a strong person, can afford to be gentle, firm, thoughtful, and restrained. It can afford to extend a helping hand to others. It is a weak nation, like a weak person, that must behave with bluster and boasting and rashness and other signs of insecurity. (Jimmy
Carter)


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Re: Table saw notes.

 

If a carbide blade is from a good manufacturer it might be worth having its bad teeth replaced. I go to Carson's saw shop, on Blair between 6th and 7th in Eugene, for my sharpening needs. They go all ga-ga over my old Freud blade when I bring it in, but they reluctantly replaced some teeth on a Grizzly blade after I did the math and concluded that it was enough cheaper to fix the cheapo blade instead of buying another.

https://www.carsonsawshop.com/

They say that the Mexican food stand parked out front is real good too, but I haven't tried them yet...

On 9/2/2020 9:24 AM, Electri-Cal wrote:
...
I scrapped 3 older saw blades, chipped teeth, gone carbide , hitting ss screws, a great help, maybe other coots might take a dedicated look at one of our most used tools, while its warm enough to enjoy the task.  At least a new red Diablo combo saw might help the cutting process??
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Any fool can make a rule, and any fool will mind it. (Henry David Thoreau)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Thanks Coots, getting started on "stuff"

 

I visited Cal today. His ammeter was hooked up somehow so it measured the current going to the motors, at least, but he was using a 200 amp shunt for a 100 amp gauge. which I now know isn't kosher. We moved the shunt to the common ground and replaced the shunt with a 100 amp one Cal had lying around. Maybe even the one that originally came with the gauge. <g> He should be getting more accurate and complete current readings now -- if the shunt's mV rating matches the gauge -- but we can't tell until we get the boat in the water, and Cal bunged up his knee so that'll be later, after he gets it rested up.

The dial ammeter Cal's been using isn't very precise. It has a range up to 100 amps, and the swing of the needle is only about 90 degrees. We really should keep trying to talk him into getting a digital gauge so he can keep better track of the current draw under different conditions. Like trying different propellers.

Cal's idea about switching off one motor to save juice is an interesting one to ponder while sitting in our armchairs. Since he started dreaming up Surprise I thought Cal only needed one of the 80 lb. motors for her. But now he's got two bolted to her bottom. Let's say he's cruising along with both motors at 3 mph. the switches one off and "throttles" up the other until he's going 3 mph again. Will he use less juice? The motors have a fairly efficient pulse width modulated speed control, so not much juice is wasted when running both motors at a reduced speed. If he switches off one motor it's still there under the boat with its propeller free wheeling causing drag. Two motors running slow, or one motor running harder and dragging a dead motor. Which will give longer range? If we can rig up a more precise ammeter in Surprise we can have fun doing some experimenting. :o)

I looked at the documentation that came with Cal's motors. Their instructions for installing them are probably OK, but I was looking for specifications. In vain. <sigh> But I did find something interesting. They said that the rule of thumb for current draw for their 12 volt motors is 1 amp per pound of thrust, but the rule of thumb for 24 volt motors is 3/4 amp per pound of thrust! I wonder whty it isn't just half the draw of the 12 volt jobs, as you'd expect... So Tuffy;s 50ish amp draw at full chat isn't above her rating. Cal's motors could draw 120 amps at full power,

On 9/2/2020 7:56 AM, Electri-Cal wrote:
...
When Myles Swift and I at the very first trial used my 40 lb clamp on Minn Kota at Dexter, we had a great time.  Same at first Fern Ridge trip, clamp on 40 lb. --  big ol' stick handle up in the air, no other power needed. So, back to the beginning, using one 80 lb., like the one on John Kohnens sail boat, coupled to 4 series 27's and the "close "enough for now" gauges ought to run for quite a while. ...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A strong nation, like a strong person, can afford to be gentle, firm, thoughtful, and restrained. It can afford to extend a helping hand to others. It is a weak nation, like a weak person, that must behave with bluster and boasting and rashness and other signs of insecurity. (Jimmy Carter)
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Re: Mini 12 meter Boomer parts for 4 boats

 

Jove still has a job. Cuts into his boat time terribly, but they keep throwing money at him, so what can he do? <g>

I thought Toledo Joe would have piped up by now. The Retired Old Geezers at the Toledo Boathouses sail Dragon Force 65s. I don't know how much of that is going on now, what with the Dread Virus. <sigh> It seems like RC sailing ought to be something folks could do with safe social distancing.

https://dragonforce65.us/

On 9/1/2020 4:58 PM, Electri-Cal wrote:
Come on by, Jove !!
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Just think what a dull world it would be if everyone was sensible. (Lucy Maud Montgomery)
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Re: Table Saw Blues --- Burnt out motor !!

Case Turner
 

When we sold our last house that had a shop I sold all my big floor saws. 

I now have all Deealt battery operated gear. Chop saw, table saw, drills, etc. 

Really like all of them. 

Case

Sent from not here

On Sep 2, 2020, at 6:54 PM, Jhcalbany@... via groups.io <Jhcalbany@...> wrote:

Don't be like me, Cal. I had a cheepie Craftsman table saw that I got on sale for $ 99.00 & in 3 or 4 years burnt the motor out. I got all the numbers & gave them to my wife & had her order a motor from Craftsman. When it got here the bill was $ 102.00. Jim

--
Dirt


Re: Table Saw Blues --- Burnt out motor !!

Jhcalbany@aol.com
 

Don't be like me, Cal. I had a cheepie Craftsman table saw that I got on sale for $ 99.00 & in 3 or 4 years burnt the motor out. I got all the numbers & gave them to my wife & had her order a motor from Craftsman. When it got here the bill was $ 102.00. Jim


Re: Table saw notes.

Pete Leenhouts
 

very helpful, Cal, thank you.

Pete
Port Ludlow
Having table saw troubles 


-----Original Message-----
From: Electri-Cal <calboats@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Sep 2, 2020 9:24 am
Subject: [oregoncoots] Table saw notes.

Finished the belt replacement, new brushes as long as the motor was out.  I added a 3 wire plug, then wrapped that in dust proof cover.  If another service is needed, it will just unplug in a jiffy.  It was good to have the motor to get the right belt etc,. without the hassle of unwiring the switch way up inside.  Harbor Freight makes a dust catcher for most table saws for $7.00  that hooks under the stand up frame, think i'll add one of those.  Gets tired of the cats in the sawdust.   Maybe a paneling in of the floor stand would catch more too.  All this, and I scrapped 3 older saw blades, chipped teeth, gone carbide , hitting ss screws, a great help, maybe other coots might take a dedicated look at one of our most used tools, while its warm enough to enjoy the task.  At least a new red Diablo combo saw might help the cutting process??

Just in case !!!  Do we have a good source for a driveway blading and re gravelling ??  Our access is needing a new smooth and topcoat this year sometime.

Have a great day, ----  Cal


Table saw notes.

Electri-Cal
 

Finished the belt replacement, new brushes as long as the motor was out.  I added a 3 wire plug, then wrapped that in dust proof cover.  If another service is needed, it will just unplug in a jiffy.  It was good to have the motor to get the right belt etc,. without the hassle of unwiring the switch way up inside.  Harbor Freight makes a dust catcher for most table saws for $7.00  that hooks under the stand up frame, think i'll add one of those.  Gets tired of the cats in the sawdust.   Maybe a paneling in of the floor stand would catch more too.  All this, and I scrapped 3 older saw blades, chipped teeth, gone carbide , hitting ss screws, a great help, maybe other coots might take a dedicated look at one of our most used tools, while its warm enough to enjoy the task.  At least a new red Diablo combo saw might help the cutting process??

Just in case !!!  Do we have a good source for a driveway blading and re gravelling ??  Our access is needing a new smooth and topcoat this year sometime.

Have a great day, ----  Cal


Thanks Coots, getting started on "stuff"

Electri-Cal
 

I see Jove got me to relook at the gauge, I installed it yesterday.  I used a bridge that was there all ready, so just double the voltage figures, easy to do.  Same for the larger amp draw gauge, ordered a convenient rated unit, so both can be looked at and read as a 12 volt setup,  As i mentioned, when under clear water easy cruise. solo minimum weight to push it also works, I think.  Plan is to periodically change from one 80 lb. thrust single to the other to minimize wear factors, cruise then should be pretty good with all 4 batts,. on one motor at a time.

When Myles Swift and I at the very first trial used my 40 lb clamp on Minn Kota at Dexter, we had a great time.  Same at first Fern Ridge trip, clamp on 40 lb. --  big ol' stick handle up in the air, no other power needed. So, back to the beginning, using one 80 lb., like the one on John Kohnens sail boat, coupled to 4 series 27's and the "close "enough for now" gauges ought to run for quite a while.  I might even try the original 2 blade props, since one 3 blade prop shut down, has more drag.  For testing, I plan on the same 2 - 24 volt packs and see if the in water range gets extended by much, using each alone -- so the reserve power is still there, for now.

Still planning on that genset, or back up pack, since I own two extra batts. for later options.   That should give me (estimate here)  from notes in summary -- 15 amp. is 2.8 mph --  then jumps to 20 amps at  3.1 mph.  -- 30 amps at 3.6 so that is not so hot.  That's with both motors, cut that close to half draw, don't add more speed to compensate over 3 mph.   Does 10/12 amps at about 3.0 mph one motor running make sense, in the right weather and load??   I'm an optimist of course, so a repeated testing at Dexter looks to be a good step, soon as the easier reading wider scale amp meter comes in next week. 

PS, older Honda (small) 400 gensets do NOT use standard fuses, odd special sizes from 1978 types.  I ordered mini blade type fuse holders to take modern fuses, some stuff can not be predicted !!

Later, Coots time for home chores, lunch with John K. here, yay !! ---  Cal



Anyhoo!!  That is the plan, as always observations are welcome 




Re: This Saturday: Sauvie's Island Circumnavigation Planning Meeting

Richard Green
 

I seldom go anywhere but I’d be there except just got tested the second time in five days for the covid so having to lay low.  I’ve circumnavigated Sauvie island a few times in different boats including one trip at close to 40 mph in a old friend’s boat, still have nightmares.  Willow Bar, a pooka on the Columbia side used to be ‘just a moorage’ until the PYC bought it for a destination for their members.  I moored my Columbia 21 there for eleven dollars a month.  Ten minutes from parking and you were “out to sea” in the Columbia, mid island.  Spent a couple summers there, the best small boat sailing on the entire lower river.  Winds all summer blowing upstream so tack down to St Helens, run back to Kelly point.  Anchor and swim in to the Marshall Beach Tavern a bit upstream from Willow Bar, clam strips and shoot pool…until it burned to the ground a couple years later.  

Rich



On Sep 2, 2020, at 1:37 AM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

This Saturday, the 5th, starting at 1:00, we're gonna have a socially distanced, outdoor lunch and planning session at Earl's, north of Corvallis, for the Columbia River and Multnomah Channel cruise later this month. Cherrill will make us lunch. Please let us know if you're gonna come, so she can make enough food.

Coots who aren't planning on doing the circumnavgation can come too, just to get some boat BSing in.

If you don't know how to get to Earl's, let me know and I'll send you directions
--
John <jkohnen@...>
A facility for quotation covers the absence of original thought. (Lord Peter Wimsey)
Sent from some sort of mobile device.





This Saturday: Sauvie's Island Circumnavigation Planning Meeting

 

This Saturday, the 5th, starting at 1:00, we're gonna have a socially distanced, outdoor lunch and planning session at Earl's, north of Corvallis, for the Columbia River and Multnomah Channel cruise later this month. Cherrill will make us lunch. Please let us know if you're gonna come, so she can make enough food.

Coots who aren't planning on doing the circumnavgation can come too, just to get some boat BSing in.

If you don't know how to get to Earl's, let me know and I'll send you directions
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A facility for quotation covers the absence of original thought. (Lord Peter Wimsey)
Sent from some sort of mobile device.


Re: Mini 12 meter Boomer parts for 4 boats

Electri-Cal
 

Come on by, Jove !!  I have one of the 12 's the electric runabout of course, and you would be welcome to set awhile, bag a beer, or whatever.  I have week days off till 4 pm, when my wife gets home.  Unfortunately that also has my weekends pretty full.  Seems like John Kohnen, and Charlie Vader are the other locals who can make it this a way, so the more the merrier.  The  is well along, but I'm ambiguous about it at this point.  Everything is good even a new radio, etc. at least worth a viewing so you can see what it looks like.

ZZZZipp !!  Later, ----  Cal



Re: Mini 12 meter Boomer parts for 4 boats

Randy Torgerson
 

If you watch Acorn To Arabella, the boys there bought Victoria for parts and I believe she was an Atkins Eric.  There are several videos on Victoria and the one where they dismantle her is very informative of that happens to a wooden boat when you don't maintain her properly.  The keel was rotted away and filled with junk.

Randy

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