Date   

Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Electri-Cal
 

Wow, Lots of response on this topic, some great ideas to help with a common builders problem.  I'm thinking to add a couple more ideas to that topic now.  With a good clothes pole handle or metal heavy handle and a small front lip , the cabinets can be carried to a job if organized for that duty.   Using the sides of fairly permanent boxes, pegboard can be mounted on the box ends, for hangers between solid cases.  I like my own pegboard wall coverings, they were there when we bought the house, along with a 1/8 in. steel topped built in layout and heavy work counter. 

Boy Howdy !!  -- That's handy too.  I use Harbor Freight 90 - 45 degree magnetic clamps for saw tables for assembly,  By the way, magnets stuck on an adjustable drafting angle tool can help locate several angles as needed.  I measure, transfer to the steel, welding pencil mark the lines, and erase easy after assembly, I like the accuracy with the quick erase as needed on a blued steel surface.

Always a 2 ft., by  4 ft steel level area -- and non glue or paint sticking surface, if I clear it off !!  The previous owner rebuilt machinery for a logging co., and needed a steel table with a big vice on one corner for assembly.  One of the many reasons, beside the small barn, and a full wall of heavy storage shelving built in, that we bought here in the first 5 minutes over 30 years ago.. 

Happy shopkeeping,  Cal



Re: Coast-to-coast canoe paddle

 

Outdoor writer John Edwin Hogg did a West to East trip across the continent in an outboard motorboat, Transco, in 1925. In 1959 he did it East to West in Transco II, and wrote a book about it -- that you can read for free:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/yaehlxhh

or

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uva.x004108348&view=1up&seq=17

I'm sensing a theme, about the sanity of these voyagers. ;o)

"It seemed probable that almost anyone to whom I talked about my plan would doubt my sanity. Indeed, what man in his right mind would even think about starting such a project at the age of sixty-seven after having endured the hardships and hazards of a similar expedition at the age of thirty-four?"

His wife had this to say:

"'I admire your spirit, your fortitude, and your courage ... but I deplore your judgement! ... If you feel that you must do it, I'd suggest keeping all the insurance you now have. Then I'll call our insurance agent and have him write a new policy on your head ... against woodpeckers!'"

I haven't yet been able to find Hogg's account of his first transcontinental voyage, which was published in MoToR BoatinG. The "Transco" designed by C. D. Mower, and whose plans are in the MoTor BoatinG Ideal Series, nos. 9, 10, and 22, was inspired by Hogg's Transco, and gives an idea of what sort of boat she was. I should scan the plans, because Mower's Transco would make a good, relatively low-powered (two 1925 outboards -- 4 hp. each?) boat for use today:

"Transcontinental which is being enjoyed by the
readers of MoToR BoatinG has aroused a considerable interest in outboard motor boats and many requests have been received for a design of a boat similar to the one in which Mr. Hogg and his companions made their voyage across the continent.

"By good fortune, Transcontinental occupied a berth in the Motor Boat Show where she could be seen from every angle and the writer spent a considerable amount of time studying her lines and taking her in generally. She was not dolled up for the Show and at first glance she gave the impression of a rather dirty and more or less disreputable little craft that was a cross between a row boat and a motor
boat. A more careful inspection, however, showed her to be a boat of unusually nice lines and of an
easily driven form with a fine forebody and a very clean run aft. The construction in general,
and the planking in particular, gave evidence that she was built by an expert in the art of boat
building and except for a crude emergency repair job on her stern transom which was made after
she was so nearly wrecked in the Columbia River, the hull was in almost as good condition structurally as it was the day she left her builder's hands.

"The design given herewith is not an exact reproduction of Transcontinental but is a boat of almost identically the same dimensions of length, breadth, depth, free-board and of the same general arrangement of interior. The extreme over all length is eighteen feet and the extreme breadth five feet. The stern of Transcontinental impressed the writer as being almost too fine at the water line and of insufficient buoyancy for a boat carrying two outboard motors on her stern and the new design shows a wider and flatter stern to prevent her settling when under way. This change of lines is also due in a measure to having seen a photograph of Trans-continental taken off the Statue of Liberty, in New York Harbor, which shows about six feet of her bow clear of the water like a hydroplane before getting over the hump and settling down to her planing trim."

Of course Sam McKinney did a West to East trip, taking several years and several boats, and wrote it up in Sailing Uphill:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y9e864wn

or

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&cm_sp=SearchF-_-home-_-Results&kn=&an=&tn=Sailing+Uphill&isbn=

On 4/30/2020 5:25 PM, Rich G wrote:
Seems like this strip is a bit of a reverse trip similar to Least Heat Moon’s River Horse. The all canoe nature of the trip is different and of course the direction. It’ll be interesting to see how it plays out. I wish him the best!
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Everyone should believe in something; I believe I'll go fishing. (Henry David Thoreau)
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Re: Coast-to-coast canoe paddle

Mark Neuhaus
 

In this book, On The WaterDiscovering America in a Rowboat, by Nathaniel Stone, the traveler is rowing, and he does the Great Loop over two summers using two different boats. I enjoyed it when I read it years ago, maybe because I've wanted to boat long portions of that same route.  Someday, maybe .....


Re: Coast-to-coast canoe paddle

Richard Green
 

Seems like this strip is a bit of a reverse trip similar to Least Heat Moon’s River Horse. The all canoe nature of the trip is different and of course the direction. It’ll be interesting to see how it plays out. I wish him the best!

Rich

On Apr 30, 2020, at 3:26 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

Thanks, Myles. I wish him luck. It'll be a particularly interesting voyage in these times.

"He set out up the Columbia River on February 1,which all the locals insisted was too early and too cold for anyone in their right mind!" Well, yeah. But who in their right mind would paddle a canoe across the country anyway? <g>

http://freshwaternews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Apr-May-2020-press.pdf

On 4/28/2020 6:12 PM, Myles Twete wrote:
Article about a Neal Moore canoeing from West Coast to East.
http://freshwaternews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Apr-May-2020-press.pdf
Page 4
--
John <@Jkohnen>
I'd rather be wrong on my own than be right on somebody else's say-so. (Sterling Hayden)


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Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Pete Leenhouts
 

I have the same problem out in the shop! I swear the stuff multiplies in the dark! 

Pete
Many years ago I built a hanging cabinet for the laundry room so we have a place to put all the junk that was piling up on the dryer.  I built the cabinet out of 3/4 Oak shop ply which made it very heavy.  The only way I could mount it was to use a French cleat and put 4 screws into the studs.  Now 15 years later the cabinet full and is still working well: there is still junk piling up on the dryer;)

Randy



-----Original Message-----
From: Randy Torgerson <coots@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 30, 2020 3:07 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] New to me - shop tool storage

Many years ago I built a hanging cabinet for the laundry room so we have a place to put all the junk that was piling up on the dryer.  I built the cabinet out of 3/4 Oak shop ply which made it very heavy.  The only way I could mount it was to use a French cleat and put 4 screws into the studs.  Now 15 years later the cabinet full and is still working well: there is still junk piling up on the dryer;)

Randy


TSCA Council Nominations

John Weiss
 

We're still looking for a few good men & women! Self-nominations are encouraged.

From Andy Wolfe yesterday:

The deadline for National Council nominations is April 30, 2020. There are 3 open positions, and the term is three years. If you love small boats, building small boats, or just sailing small boats, consider a position on the Council. The work is easy, you have no liabilities, and the rewards are many. Volunteer or nominate a friend by emailing David Fitch, efitchtx@... today.


Re: Almost forgot, open lake

 

The ramp at Triangle Lake is a County Park, and Lane County didn't shut down it's parks for the dread Virus. I hope those boaters at Triangle Lake were being responsible and not crowding together at the ramp, or packing non-housemates into their boats. If the County thinks the parks are attracting irresponsible behavior they may shut them down.

The ramp at Orchard Point, on Fern Ridge, has been open all along, and now there's enough water there to launch most of our boats. The seasonal opening of Richardson Park has been delayed, but it's scheduled to open tomorrow.

I don't know if the marinas will open tomorrow... There's over 3 1/2 ft. of water in my slip, but it's doubtful that the lake will rise much more. <sigh> Pray for rain!

https://tinyurl.com/FRDepths

https://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf

On 4/30/2020 8:16 AM, Electri-Cal wrote:
Found an open lake for boating on yesterday, open for kokanee and bass fishing.  Seems private lakes are open, Triangle lake had several boats on the ramp and getting fishing.  I had the scooter, on a local cruise. Maybe Blue Lake outside portland too ??
--
John <@Jkohnen>
When small men begin to cast big shadows, it means that the sun is about to set. (Lin Yutang)
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Re: Coast-to-coast canoe paddle

 

Thanks, Myles. I wish him luck. It'll be a particularly interesting voyage in these times.

"He set out up the Columbia River on February 1,which all the locals insisted was too early and too cold for anyone in their right mind!" Well, yeah. But who in their right mind would paddle a canoe across the country anyway? <g>

http://freshwaternews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Apr-May-2020-press.pdf

On 4/28/2020 6:12 PM, Myles Twete wrote:
Article about a Neal Moore canoeing from West Coast to East.
http://freshwaternews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Apr-May-2020-press.pdf
Page 4
--
John <@Jkohnen>
I'd rather be wrong on my own than be right on somebody else's say-so. (Sterling Hayden)
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Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Randy Torgerson
 

Many years ago I built a hanging cabinet for the laundry room so we have a place to put all the junk that was piling up on the dryer.  I built the cabinet out of 3/4 Oak shop ply which made it very heavy.  The only way I could mount it was to use a French cleat and put 4 screws into the studs.  Now 15 years later the cabinet full and is still working well: there is still junk piling up on the dryer;)

Randy


Re: Yaquina

 

I was sure I saw a map of the railroad at Yaquina, and I thought it was in The Southern Pacific in Oregon, by Ed Austin & Tom Dill, but I was mistaken, at least about the last part. <sigh> I've attached a map of the yard at Toledo, and a shot of the old depot, just in case you might find it interesting.

Tom at the Yaquina Pacific Railroad Museum can tell you all about Yaquina, and the railroad presence in Toledo, much better than I can:

http://www.yaquinapacificrr.org/

--
John <@Jkohnen>
Life can be perfectly satisfying without major achievements. (Alice Munro)



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Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Case Turner
 

I really need to build one of these. I’ve converted all my tools, table saw, chop saw, etc to battery operated. Now I have a pile of batteries and chargers 




Case

Sent from not here

On Apr 30, 2020, at 11:51 AM, Joe Novello <joenovello3@...> wrote:


We had the same experience at the boat shop with the tool holders wiggling and sometimes falling off. We solve the problem by putting wedges between the top of the cleat and the bottom of the cleat above it.Problem solved simple and effective.

On Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 11:15 AM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
Was there meant to be a link with the original email?
I’m definitely interested in pictures of what works for people. My board is below.

I made a 4x4 tool board with French cleats. I’m not sure I’d do it again since the tool holders tend to wiggle a little and a couple get close to falling off sometimes so I e added a screw to those. Generally I’m happy with the ability to move things around and it’s cheaper and much more attractive than a peg board system with all those holes and wire objects, at least to me.
I’m interested in tips to make it work better though. I’ve found that the tool holder needs to hang down somewhat to work well. Coming straight out it can pry it’s self off with repeated vibration of removing tools.
<image1.jpeg>

-Jove


On Apr 30, 2020, at 8:20 AM, Stephen Miller <w7srmsteve@...> wrote:

I have used french cleats to create clamp racks and to hang some wood cabinets on the shop/garage walls.  They work great!   

One tip is to save some small pieces of the cleats as templates for the next time.  Makes set up easier. 

Steve Miller

--
Joe Novello

--
Dirt


Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Joe Novello
 

We had the same experience at the boat shop with the tool holders wiggling and sometimes falling off. We solve the problem by putting wedges between the top of the cleat and the bottom of the cleat above it.Problem solved simple and effective.

On Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 11:15 AM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
Was there meant to be a link with the original email?
I’m definitely interested in pictures of what works for people. My board is below.

I made a 4x4 tool board with French cleats. I’m not sure I’d do it again since the tool holders tend to wiggle a little and a couple get close to falling off sometimes so I e added a screw to those. Generally I’m happy with the ability to move things around and it’s cheaper and much more attractive than a peg board system with all those holes and wire objects, at least to me.
I’m interested in tips to make it work better though. I’ve found that the tool holder needs to hang down somewhat to work well. Coming straight out it can pry it’s self off with repeated vibration of removing tools.
image1.jpeg
-Jove


On Apr 30, 2020, at 8:20 AM, Stephen Miller <w7srmsteve@...> wrote:

I have used french cleats to create clamp racks and to hang some wood cabinets on the shop/garage walls.  They work great!   

One tip is to save some small pieces of the cleats as templates for the next time.  Makes set up easier. 

Steve Miller

--
Joe Novello


Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Was there meant to be a link with the original email?
I’m definitely interested in pictures of what works for people. My board is below.

I made a 4x4 tool board with French cleats. I’m not sure I’d do it again since the tool holders tend to wiggle a little and a couple get close to falling off sometimes so I e added a screw to those. Generally I’m happy with the ability to move things around and it’s cheaper and much more attractive than a peg board system with all those holes and wire objects, at least to me.
I’m interested in tips to make it work better though. I’ve found that the tool holder needs to hang down somewhat to work well. Coming straight out it can pry it’s self off with repeated vibration of removing tools.
image1.jpeg
-Jove


On Apr 30, 2020, at 8:20 AM, Stephen Miller <w7srmsteve@...> wrote:

I have used french cleats to create clamp racks and to hang some wood cabinets on the shop/garage walls.  They work great!   

One tip is to save some small pieces of the cleats as templates for the next time.  Makes set up easier. 

Steve Miller


Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Pete Leenhouts
 

I use this system in my garage shop (2 1/2 bay). Wooden tool boxes 24x48 inches are hung on the cleat, which is screwed into the wall studs with 3-inch deck screws. The tool boxes, which are made of 3/4 inch ply, are just hung on the cleat. Custom tool holders are used inside each box. I segregated the tools in each box by their use...there's one for chisels, drill bits, marking and measuring, saws and so forth. This system has been in place for 15 years, now. 

While I think the French clear idea works extremely well, I don't think the box idea has worked equally well. It was ok when I had fewer tools, and but as the number of working tools increased, the boxes began to really cramp what I could do with respect to storage, and unnecessarily constricted the system's flexibility. (I admit to being somewhat of a pack rat when it comes to tools). My brother also uses French cleats, but doesn't use boxes. He built custom holders for his tools as I did but instead, just hangs those on the cleats, which seems to be a better system. I am not going to change my system - there is a box for just about everything I need and it helps me to know in an instant what is where and possibly more importantly what is missing. I can post pix if that would be of interest to the Coots. 

Pete 
Pete Leenhouts
MV RIPTIDE (stripping the forward head at the moment)



-----Original Message-----
From: Electri-Cal <calboats@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 30, 2020 8:08 am
Subject: [oregoncoots] New to me - shop tool storage

For radically improving most work shops, and having portable tool holders in convenient locations, this looks to be a great remodel idea.  Most are made from scrap wood, for a low cost approach solution.   Several sites on line show "French Cleats", as a systematic approach to shop easier tool handling practices.  Soon as I'm done of course, or mostly - with the new window wood valience, and the new design kayak paddle for a couple themed projects.  I did one project on better extension cord storage years ago.   Check out the 20 plus shop storage ideas, then also look at the 5 mistakes in building "French Cleat" types of tool storage on another related site, just in case.  Hummm, keeping tools handy as well as sharp makes the whole  building process easier and safer. 

Check it out, Coots, ---  cal 


Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Stephen Miller
 

I have used french cleats to create clamp racks and to hang some wood cabinets on the shop/garage walls.  They work great!   

One tip is to save some small pieces of the cleats as templates for the next time.  Makes set up easier. 

Steve Miller


Almost forgot, open lake

Electri-Cal
 

Found an open lake for boating on yesterday, open for kokanee and bass fishing.  Seems private lakes are open, Triangle lake had several boats on the ramp and getting fishing.  I had the scooter, on a local cruise.  Maybe Blue Lake outside portland too ??

Later,  Cal


New to me - shop tool storage

Electri-Cal
 

For radically improving most work shops, and having portable tool holders in convenient locations, this looks to be a great remodel idea.  Most are made from scrap wood, for a low cost approach solution.   Several sites on line show "French Cleats", as a systematic approach to shop easier tool handling practices.  Soon as I'm done of course, or mostly - with the new window wood valience, and the new design kayak paddle for a couple themed projects.  I did one project on better extension cord storage years ago.   Check out the 20 plus shop storage ideas, then also look at the 5 mistakes in building "French Cleat" types of tool storage on another related site, just in case.  Hummm, keeping tools handy as well as sharp makes the whole  building process easier and safer. 

Check it out, Coots, ---  cal 


Coast-to-coast canoe paddle

Myles Twete
 

Article about a Neal Moore canoeing from West Coast to East.
http://freshwaternews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Apr-May-2020-press.pdf
Page 4

-----Original Message-----
From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Kohnen
Sent: Sunday, April 26, 2020 3:22 PM
To: Oregon Coots <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: [oregoncoots] More NW Event Cancellations

Some more cancellations Up North. This notice was sent out by the Puget Sound TSCA chapter. Be sure to check with event organizers before getting ready to go to any event:

Current Situation as of April 26, 2020

Parks and boat launches are closed until at least May 4th. A Stay-at-Home order remains in effect.

The Small Boat Camp-Cruising Workshop has been cancelled.

The Pocket Yacht Palooza and Palooza Crooza have been cancelled.

The Mystery Bay Annual TSCA Meeting and Messabout has been cancelled.

The Montague Harbor Rendezvous has been cancelled.

The Sucia Small Boat Rendezvous has been cancelled.

The Salish-100 small boat cruise has been cancelled.

The Race to Alaska (R2AK) has been cancelled.

The Seventy48 race has been cancelled.

The Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival has been cancelled.

The Center for Wooden Boats has closed both campuses

For current Oregon Coots TSCA chapter event status, visit their website at http://www.coots.org/mb/


--
John <@Jkohnen>
If Heaven had looked upon riches to be a valuable thing, it would not
have given them to such a scoundrel. (Jonathan Swift)


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Boating & Fishing Reopening in Washington

 

Pete L forwarded this notice from the Recreational Boating Association of Washington (RBAW). Good news! I hope bunches of idiots don't spoil it:

Hello RBAW Members,
We are excited to share Gov. Inslee’s proclamation for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Re-Start, effective May 5th. Of the utmost importance, this re-start assumes recreational boaters will ensure all COVID-19 safety guidelines continue to be met with regards to physical distancing, having close proximity with only members of your household, no large gatherings, and remembering to wash your hands frequently.

At a high level – DNR recreation sites, some state parks and public lands will be opened for day-use and WDFW will open some recreational fishing and hunting. This is only the beginning of multiple phases of re-opening outdoor recreation - as described, this is a “turning of the dial” vs. “flipping of the switch”. We at RBAW are just happy to start enjoying our waters and parks again!!
You can find the specifics of Gov. Inslee’s May 5th re-start at the links below. Please take a moment to review as there are specific guidelines that must be followed.

The Washington State website will provide you with important information. See the Latest News section.
https://coronavirus.wa.gov/

Gov Inslee Press Release
https://www.governor.wa.gov/news-media/inslee-announces-easing-outdoor-restrictions

Amending Proclamation
Amending Proclamation 20-25.2 Outdoor Recreation Restart Guidelines.pdf

Guidance Document
https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/proclamations/Amending%20Proclamation%2020-25.2%20Outdoor%20Recreation%20Restart%20Guidelines.pdf

Fishing Regulations
https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/

If you have any questions, please email us at info@....

Thank you and please stay safe.
RBAW

--
John <@Jkohnen>
One cat just leads to another. (Ernest Hemingway)


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Re: Yaquina

 

Thanks, Jim. I'll have to pick up a copy next time I'm over there, and the Museum is open. Or maybe we can swap our Yaquina books, if we can ever get together again... <g>

Here are a few photos from On the Yaquina and Big Elk. See attachments. The first is proof that rock did go down the river in barges. <g> "Elk City rock" may mean it came from the old quarry we can see across Big Elk Creek from the park in Elk City.

The second is the Pioneer quarry. Pioneer is up the Yaquina from Elk City, past where river transport is practical, and it's on the same side of the river as the railroad. Or at least the remains of the town are, I suppose the quarry could have been anywhere nearby...

Last is something for the boat nuts. Isn't that a fine looking rowboat!

Alas, the reproduction of the photos in On the Yaquina and Big Elk is terrible. <sigh> But I'll bet they're in the collection in the museum archives.

On 4/27/2020 7:22 PM, Jim C wrote:
I got the book at the museum in Toledo. I have to call my brother inlaw in Newport about the barges. He couldn't figure how the train got to the jetty. Thanks
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John <@Jkohnen>
He was a bold man that first eat an oyster. (Jonathan Swift)
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