Date   

Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Randy Torgerson
 

Many years ago I built a hanging cabinet for the laundry room so we have a place to put all the junk that was piling up on the dryer.  I built the cabinet out of 3/4 Oak shop ply which made it very heavy.  The only way I could mount it was to use a French cleat and put 4 screws into the studs.  Now 15 years later the cabinet full and is still working well: there is still junk piling up on the dryer;)

Randy


Re: Yaquina

 

I was sure I saw a map of the railroad at Yaquina, and I thought it was in The Southern Pacific in Oregon, by Ed Austin & Tom Dill, but I was mistaken, at least about the last part. <sigh> I've attached a map of the yard at Toledo, and a shot of the old depot, just in case you might find it interesting.

Tom at the Yaquina Pacific Railroad Museum can tell you all about Yaquina, and the railroad presence in Toledo, much better than I can:

http://www.yaquinapacificrr.org/

--
John <@Jkohnen>
Life can be perfectly satisfying without major achievements. (Alice Munro)



--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Case Turner
 

I really need to build one of these. I’ve converted all my tools, table saw, chop saw, etc to battery operated. Now I have a pile of batteries and chargers 




Case

Sent from not here

On Apr 30, 2020, at 11:51 AM, Joe Novello <joenovello3@...> wrote:


We had the same experience at the boat shop with the tool holders wiggling and sometimes falling off. We solve the problem by putting wedges between the top of the cleat and the bottom of the cleat above it.Problem solved simple and effective.

On Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 11:15 AM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
Was there meant to be a link with the original email?
I’m definitely interested in pictures of what works for people. My board is below.

I made a 4x4 tool board with French cleats. I’m not sure I’d do it again since the tool holders tend to wiggle a little and a couple get close to falling off sometimes so I e added a screw to those. Generally I’m happy with the ability to move things around and it’s cheaper and much more attractive than a peg board system with all those holes and wire objects, at least to me.
I’m interested in tips to make it work better though. I’ve found that the tool holder needs to hang down somewhat to work well. Coming straight out it can pry it’s self off with repeated vibration of removing tools.
<image1.jpeg>

-Jove


On Apr 30, 2020, at 8:20 AM, Stephen Miller <w7srmsteve@...> wrote:

I have used french cleats to create clamp racks and to hang some wood cabinets on the shop/garage walls.  They work great!   

One tip is to save some small pieces of the cleats as templates for the next time.  Makes set up easier. 

Steve Miller

--
Joe Novello

--
Dirt


Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Joe Novello
 

We had the same experience at the boat shop with the tool holders wiggling and sometimes falling off. We solve the problem by putting wedges between the top of the cleat and the bottom of the cleat above it.Problem solved simple and effective.

On Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 11:15 AM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
Was there meant to be a link with the original email?
I’m definitely interested in pictures of what works for people. My board is below.

I made a 4x4 tool board with French cleats. I’m not sure I’d do it again since the tool holders tend to wiggle a little and a couple get close to falling off sometimes so I e added a screw to those. Generally I’m happy with the ability to move things around and it’s cheaper and much more attractive than a peg board system with all those holes and wire objects, at least to me.
I’m interested in tips to make it work better though. I’ve found that the tool holder needs to hang down somewhat to work well. Coming straight out it can pry it’s self off with repeated vibration of removing tools.
image1.jpeg
-Jove


On Apr 30, 2020, at 8:20 AM, Stephen Miller <w7srmsteve@...> wrote:

I have used french cleats to create clamp racks and to hang some wood cabinets on the shop/garage walls.  They work great!   

One tip is to save some small pieces of the cleats as templates for the next time.  Makes set up easier. 

Steve Miller

--
Joe Novello


Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Was there meant to be a link with the original email?
I’m definitely interested in pictures of what works for people. My board is below.

I made a 4x4 tool board with French cleats. I’m not sure I’d do it again since the tool holders tend to wiggle a little and a couple get close to falling off sometimes so I e added a screw to those. Generally I’m happy with the ability to move things around and it’s cheaper and much more attractive than a peg board system with all those holes and wire objects, at least to me.
I’m interested in tips to make it work better though. I’ve found that the tool holder needs to hang down somewhat to work well. Coming straight out it can pry it’s self off with repeated vibration of removing tools.
image1.jpeg
-Jove


On Apr 30, 2020, at 8:20 AM, Stephen Miller <w7srmsteve@...> wrote:

I have used french cleats to create clamp racks and to hang some wood cabinets on the shop/garage walls.  They work great!   

One tip is to save some small pieces of the cleats as templates for the next time.  Makes set up easier. 

Steve Miller


Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Pete Leenhouts
 

I use this system in my garage shop (2 1/2 bay). Wooden tool boxes 24x48 inches are hung on the cleat, which is screwed into the wall studs with 3-inch deck screws. The tool boxes, which are made of 3/4 inch ply, are just hung on the cleat. Custom tool holders are used inside each box. I segregated the tools in each box by their use...there's one for chisels, drill bits, marking and measuring, saws and so forth. This system has been in place for 15 years, now. 

While I think the French clear idea works extremely well, I don't think the box idea has worked equally well. It was ok when I had fewer tools, and but as the number of working tools increased, the boxes began to really cramp what I could do with respect to storage, and unnecessarily constricted the system's flexibility. (I admit to being somewhat of a pack rat when it comes to tools). My brother also uses French cleats, but doesn't use boxes. He built custom holders for his tools as I did but instead, just hangs those on the cleats, which seems to be a better system. I am not going to change my system - there is a box for just about everything I need and it helps me to know in an instant what is where and possibly more importantly what is missing. I can post pix if that would be of interest to the Coots. 

Pete 
Pete Leenhouts
MV RIPTIDE (stripping the forward head at the moment)



-----Original Message-----
From: Electri-Cal <calboats@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 30, 2020 8:08 am
Subject: [oregoncoots] New to me - shop tool storage

For radically improving most work shops, and having portable tool holders in convenient locations, this looks to be a great remodel idea.  Most are made from scrap wood, for a low cost approach solution.   Several sites on line show "French Cleats", as a systematic approach to shop easier tool handling practices.  Soon as I'm done of course, or mostly - with the new window wood valience, and the new design kayak paddle for a couple themed projects.  I did one project on better extension cord storage years ago.   Check out the 20 plus shop storage ideas, then also look at the 5 mistakes in building "French Cleat" types of tool storage on another related site, just in case.  Hummm, keeping tools handy as well as sharp makes the whole  building process easier and safer. 

Check it out, Coots, ---  cal 


Re: New to me - shop tool storage

Stephen Miller
 

I have used french cleats to create clamp racks and to hang some wood cabinets on the shop/garage walls.  They work great!   

One tip is to save some small pieces of the cleats as templates for the next time.  Makes set up easier. 

Steve Miller


Almost forgot, open lake

Electri-Cal
 

Found an open lake for boating on yesterday, open for kokanee and bass fishing.  Seems private lakes are open, Triangle lake had several boats on the ramp and getting fishing.  I had the scooter, on a local cruise.  Maybe Blue Lake outside portland too ??

Later,  Cal


New to me - shop tool storage

Electri-Cal
 

For radically improving most work shops, and having portable tool holders in convenient locations, this looks to be a great remodel idea.  Most are made from scrap wood, for a low cost approach solution.   Several sites on line show "French Cleats", as a systematic approach to shop easier tool handling practices.  Soon as I'm done of course, or mostly - with the new window wood valience, and the new design kayak paddle for a couple themed projects.  I did one project on better extension cord storage years ago.   Check out the 20 plus shop storage ideas, then also look at the 5 mistakes in building "French Cleat" types of tool storage on another related site, just in case.  Hummm, keeping tools handy as well as sharp makes the whole  building process easier and safer. 

Check it out, Coots, ---  cal 


Coast-to-coast canoe paddle

Myles Twete
 

Article about a Neal Moore canoeing from West Coast to East.
http://freshwaternews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Apr-May-2020-press.pdf
Page 4

-----Original Message-----
From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Kohnen
Sent: Sunday, April 26, 2020 3:22 PM
To: Oregon Coots <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: [oregoncoots] More NW Event Cancellations

Some more cancellations Up North. This notice was sent out by the Puget Sound TSCA chapter. Be sure to check with event organizers before getting ready to go to any event:

Current Situation as of April 26, 2020

Parks and boat launches are closed until at least May 4th. A Stay-at-Home order remains in effect.

The Small Boat Camp-Cruising Workshop has been cancelled.

The Pocket Yacht Palooza and Palooza Crooza have been cancelled.

The Mystery Bay Annual TSCA Meeting and Messabout has been cancelled.

The Montague Harbor Rendezvous has been cancelled.

The Sucia Small Boat Rendezvous has been cancelled.

The Salish-100 small boat cruise has been cancelled.

The Race to Alaska (R2AK) has been cancelled.

The Seventy48 race has been cancelled.

The Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival has been cancelled.

The Center for Wooden Boats has closed both campuses

For current Oregon Coots TSCA chapter event status, visit their website at http://www.coots.org/mb/


--
John <@Jkohnen>
If Heaven had looked upon riches to be a valuable thing, it would not
have given them to such a scoundrel. (Jonathan Swift)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Boating & Fishing Reopening in Washington

 

Pete L forwarded this notice from the Recreational Boating Association of Washington (RBAW). Good news! I hope bunches of idiots don't spoil it:

Hello RBAW Members,
We are excited to share Gov. Inslee’s proclamation for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Re-Start, effective May 5th. Of the utmost importance, this re-start assumes recreational boaters will ensure all COVID-19 safety guidelines continue to be met with regards to physical distancing, having close proximity with only members of your household, no large gatherings, and remembering to wash your hands frequently.

At a high level – DNR recreation sites, some state parks and public lands will be opened for day-use and WDFW will open some recreational fishing and hunting. This is only the beginning of multiple phases of re-opening outdoor recreation - as described, this is a “turning of the dial” vs. “flipping of the switch”. We at RBAW are just happy to start enjoying our waters and parks again!!
You can find the specifics of Gov. Inslee’s May 5th re-start at the links below. Please take a moment to review as there are specific guidelines that must be followed.

The Washington State website will provide you with important information. See the Latest News section.
https://coronavirus.wa.gov/

Gov Inslee Press Release
https://www.governor.wa.gov/news-media/inslee-announces-easing-outdoor-restrictions

Amending Proclamation
Amending Proclamation 20-25.2 Outdoor Recreation Restart Guidelines.pdf

Guidance Document
https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/proclamations/Amending%20Proclamation%2020-25.2%20Outdoor%20Recreation%20Restart%20Guidelines.pdf

Fishing Regulations
https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/

If you have any questions, please email us at info@....

Thank you and please stay safe.
RBAW

--
John <@Jkohnen>
One cat just leads to another. (Ernest Hemingway)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Yaquina

 

Thanks, Jim. I'll have to pick up a copy next time I'm over there, and the Museum is open. Or maybe we can swap our Yaquina books, if we can ever get together again... <g>

Here are a few photos from On the Yaquina and Big Elk. See attachments. The first is proof that rock did go down the river in barges. <g> "Elk City rock" may mean it came from the old quarry we can see across Big Elk Creek from the park in Elk City.

The second is the Pioneer quarry. Pioneer is up the Yaquina from Elk City, past where river transport is practical, and it's on the same side of the river as the railroad. Or at least the remains of the town are, I suppose the quarry could have been anywhere nearby...

Last is something for the boat nuts. Isn't that a fine looking rowboat!

Alas, the reproduction of the photos in On the Yaquina and Big Elk is terrible. <sigh> But I'll bet they're in the collection in the museum archives.

On 4/27/2020 7:22 PM, Jim C wrote:
I got the book at the museum in Toledo. I have to call my brother inlaw in Newport about the barges. He couldn't figure how the train got to the jetty. Thanks
--
John <@Jkohnen>
He was a bold man that first eat an oyster. (Jonathan Swift)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Yaquina

Jhcalbany@aol.com
 

I got the book at the museum in Toledo. I have to call my brother inlaw in Newport about the barges. He couldn't figure how the train got to the jetty. Thanks
Jim


Voyage of a Summer Sun, Robin Cody

 

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Voyage of a Summer Sun, Robin Cody
Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2020 15:04:46 -0700
From: Richard G

I have begun my copy of this book with some anticipation. Forty years ago I sailed on a 32’ ferrocement cutter from Honolulu to Astoria with an old friend on his way back from over six years out. On that trip I was in my early thirties, still young and strong with most of life ahead of me, and had time to ponder. I decided I’d like to do three things before my time was up. One was to finish my degree, which had been forestalled as I earned money, in Psych and a Masters in Counseling. A second was to build a 22’ row boat with a convertible center cockpit to row the canals of Europe, and the third was to build a canoe and canoe the Columbia/Snake from Clarkston ID to Ilwaco.

Well, I got the degree, 1/2 the masters and spent some time working in the field as I went on to discover I had the wrong temperament for the work. I visited Europe taking many boat rides in Amsterdam and Venice where you couldn’t help boating if you tried but not on the canals per se. I also learned that some parts of the system had currents and speed issues. I didn’t row in Europe. I rented a canoe a time or three and decided after canoeing a bit of the Willamette River that I was useless as a canoe paddler much preferring a kayak with foot pedal steering. It is the latter canoe trip that I will now vicariously attempt in the form of this book by Mr. Cody.

Sounds good to me.

Thanks to whomever mentioned it as I’d not heard of the book!


--
John <@Jkohnen>
I get up every morning determined both to change the world and to have one hell of a good time. Sometimes this makes planning the day difficult. (E. B. White)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Yaquina

 

Barges. The quarries were up above Toledo, and some of them were on the opposite side of the river from the railroad, so some rock went all the way downriver by water. Cannon Quarry launch ramp is probably where a dock for a quarry used to be. There was a short railroad up Mill Creek, the creek a bit below Cannon Quarry ramp, to bring rock down to the river from another quarry. I'll bet it was an interesting, jackleg sorta railroad; the sort that'd give an OSHA inspector apoplexy today. <g> But I haven't found any photos of it yet.

Another good book about life up the Yaquina River and Big Elk Creek is:

On the Yaquina and Big Elk, by Evelyn Payne Perry

It's a collection of sketches about life in the early 20th century (and up through filming Sometimes a Great Notion) around Elk City, Salado, Glen, Harlan, Burnt Woods, Eddyville and Chitwood. The author grew up around there, and rode her horse home from college in Corvallis for vacations in the '20s. One thing I noticed from the book was that horses and wagons were used up there long after more civilized places had cars and trucks; because the roads were so bad!

I got On the Yaquina and Big Elk at the museum in Newport. Where did you get As I Remember, by Carol Armington?

On 4/26/2020 7:12 PM, Jim C wrote:
Thank you, now I know where the town was. Another question  has come up; When they ran the railroad to Newport they used it to haul rock to build the jetty. How did the track get past the waterfront to the jetty?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
The first human who hurled an insult instead of a stone was the founder of civilization. (Sigmund Freud)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Yaquina

Jhcalbany@aol.com
 

Thank you, now I know where the town was. Another question  has come up; When they ran the railroad to Newport they used it to haul rock to build the jetty. How did the track get past the waterfront to the jetty?


Re: More NW Event Cancellations

Dave
 

Great list of events to look forward to next year! 


More NW Event Cancellations

 

Some more cancellations Up North. This notice was sent out by the Puget Sound TSCA chapter. Be sure to check with event organizers before getting ready to go to any event:

Current Situation as of April 26, 2020

Parks and boat launches are closed until at least May 4th. A Stay-at-Home order remains in effect.

The Small Boat Camp-Cruising Workshop has been cancelled.

The Pocket Yacht Palooza and Palooza Crooza have been cancelled.

The Mystery Bay Annual TSCA Meeting and Messabout has been cancelled.

The Montague Harbor Rendezvous has been cancelled.

The Sucia Small Boat Rendezvous has been cancelled.

The Salish-100 small boat cruise has been cancelled.

The Race to Alaska (R2AK) has been cancelled.

The Seventy48 race has been cancelled.

The Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival has been cancelled.

The Center for Wooden Boats has closed both campuses

For current Oregon Coots TSCA chapter event status, visit their website at http://www.coots.org/mb/


--
John <@Jkohnen>
If Heaven had looked upon riches to be a valuable thing, it would not have given them to such a scoundrel. (Jonathan Swift)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Yaquina

 

Here's the paper on Yaquina City I mentioned. Apologies to the author for calling him a her in my previous post. ;o)

http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/geo422/422_Paper_Sandler.pdf

Somewhere around here I've got a book about the Southern Pacific (and the other railroads it absorbed) in Oregon that has a map of the railroad in Yaquina...

On 4/25/2020 4:52 PM, Jim C wrote:
I just read a book by a lady who grew up in Toledo & she talks about the town of Yaquina being the end of the railroad from the valley. The book was published in 2004 & she claimed the old turntable is gone but there is a house built over the hole the turntable was on & is still there. Any one ever heard of this? My wife thinks the town of Yaquina was where the oyster place is.
As I Remember
by Carol Armington
--
John <@Jkohnen>
The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don't want, drink what you don't like, and do what you'd rather not. (Mark Twain)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Yaquina

 

As Joe mentioned, Yaquina City was where the Mad Dog Tavern and Sawyer's Landing are today. The Newport city fathers wouldn't pungle up a subsidy for Mr. Hogg to run his railroad into town, so he decided to build his own international seaport city at Yaquina. Passengers and freight came from the valley on the railroad, then crossed the bay on steamers to Newport, Obviously, Mr. Hogg's grand ideas never panned out. It's a very interesting story...

The railroad ran out of Toledo through where the boatyard is and the old bed meets up with the Bay Road after your drive over the hill above the boatyard, the road then follows the railroad bed to Yaquina. When the road was young it crossed the sloughs on the railroad trestles you can still see. They just laid boards on the trestles, with no guardrails or any of that kind of sissy stuff. <g>

If you poke around on the Interweb you'll find a paper written by a college student about Yaquina City. She has some interesting stuff in the paper, but ends it with a photo of that wooden barge moldering away by the Bay Road several miles above Yaquina. The caption reads. "all that's left of Yaquina City"! Nonsense. Yaquina today is actually a pretty hopping place; less of a "ghost town" than Elk City.

On 4/25/2020 4:52 PM, Jim C wrote:
I just read a book by a lady who grew up in Toledo & she talks about the town of Yaquina being the end of the railroad from the valley. The book was published in 2004 & she claimed the old turntable is gone but there is a house built over the hole the turntable was on & is still there. Any one ever heard of this? My wife thinks the town of Yaquina was where the oyster place is.

--
John <@Jkohnen>
Fanaticism consists in redoubling your effort when you have forgotten your aim. (George Santayana)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com