Date   

Re: Beaver Creek Messabout Next Saturday, the 11th

 

Good for you, John! You are indeed an intrepid voyager. :o) But it WAS NOT the Right place. <g> We start at the launch ramp just off Hwy 101, and have lunch at the new kayak dock upstream -- if we make it that far.

I'm glad the new keel worked so well at keeping the kayak going where you wanted it to go. I'm not sure that thin fins really increase the waterline length as far as wave-making goes, since they don't make much in the way of waves. It'd be interesting to do some experiments. Or somebody could just look it up! ;o) The better directional stability will make the kayak paddle easier, and probably go faster, anyway.

On 1/20/2020 10:32 PM, John P wrote:
I was going to let this slide, but today I got a message on my phone that a new "memory" has been added.  To my surprise it was a movie of pictures I had taken on the Beaver Creek Messabout on Jan 11th.
Was quite impressed by what the phone had done all by itself.  Figured out how to download the movie and made a Youtube video.
For your entertainment, here's a link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZJ-nYC1b8I
Now here's the commentary . . .
Early in the week my thoughts had turned to wanting to construct keel 2.0 on the white water kayak and try it out on the upcoming Beaver Creek Messabout on Saturday.
...
Arrived late at the kayak launch parking lot around 11:00 AM, pushoff was scheduled to be at 10.  There were no other cars in the lot so wondered if I was in the right place.
...
The keel 2.0 worked well, maybe better than to be expected. I felt like
I had training wheels on, the kayak was so well behaved. The keel also
increased the waterline from around 7 feet to just under 10 feet. Not
really sure if it's noticeable but the theoretical hull speed should be
increased from around 3.5 knots to 4.2 knots.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. (Franklin Delano Roosevelt)


Re: Beaver Creek Messabout Next Saturday, the 11th

Richard Green
 

Dang, John, you ARE the man!  Thanks for the nice report of what might have been an otherwise risky foray given the weather and stream flow.  Glad it worked out. 

Rich

On Jan 20, 2020, at 10:32 PM, John Purdy via Groups.Io <jtpurdy@...> wrote:

I was going to let this slide, but today I got a message on my phone that a new "memory" has been added.  To my surprise it was a movie of pictures I had taken on the Beaver Creek Messabout on Jan 11th.

Was quite impressed by what the phone had done all by itself.  Figured out how to download the movie and made a Youtube video.

For your entertainment, here's a link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZJ-nYC1b8I

Now here's the commentary . . .

Early in the week my thoughts had turned to wanting to construct keel 2.0 on the white water kayak and try it out on the upcoming Beaver Creek Messabout on Saturday.  Anyone on the Halloween Yaquina River Float saw my attempts at keel 1.0.  I had wanted to adapt the white water boat to make it track a little straighter in flat water. Keel 1.0 was a complete failure. The kayak was just as squirrely with it as without it.  The deep rocker of the kayak kept most of what I had added in the bow and stern as keel 1.0 out of the water.

Thursday afternoon got busy with some ideas, more pine shelving boards, a tape measure, and a jigsaw. Constructed keel 2.0 pieces, gorilla glued and clamped them to keel 1.0 for a deeper longer keel.

After some course sanding and shaping I left for the Brian Booth State Park on Friday night, overnighting near Eugene, then driving the remaining distance Saturday morning.  I wondered if anyone would show up as I drove US 101 south from Newport with wipers on high and gusty buffeting winds tossing the car side to side.  It was really miserable out.

Arrived late at the kayak launch parking lot around 11:00 AM, pushoff was scheduled to be at 10.  There were no other cars in the lot so wondered if I was in the right place.  Inland the wind and rain had subsided. There was a hint of sunshine.  Unloaded the kayak, carried it down the path to the kayak launch dock.  Got changed and took a GPS point so I'd be sure to be able to find my way back.

Shoved off winding my way through the little byways to get to the main creek checking land marks and looking behind me so I would be able to recognize the path back.  Although it was cool, it was rather nice out.  Paddling down the main flow towards the ocean I noticed two things ahead.  1) A very low bridge for the Beaver Creek road I'd just driven up, and 2) Dark clouds moving in fast from the west.  I arrived at the bridge about the same time the sky opened up.  Rain poured all around for about 5 to 10 minutes while I stayed dry under the bridge.  That worked out nicely.

Further down the creek came to an empty refreshment stand.  Odd, never seen anything like this before.  A refreshment stand in a shack on stilts in the middle of the water.  The water level was about 15" above the floor inside.  The creek flowed north for about another half mile, then a big turn to the left went west towards the ocean.  At the turn I noticed that the water was flowing faster to the sea than it was an hour and a half earlier when I'd started.  The wind was picking up and the area much more exposed.  Being unfamiliar with the area and alone,  I didn't want to take a chance on the flow increasing further and making it harder to return, so I turned around short of sighting US 101 or the ocean.  The wind gave me a nice push and I made good time up stream.  Broke out my sandwich for lunch.  I'd take a bite, make a few strokes then take another bite.  Reached the Y that would take me back to the kayak dock and thought, what's up stream?  Still lots of daylight left so I paddled up stream to yet another low bridge.  This one too low to go under.  Looked like about a half a knot of current there.  I lazily rode the current back to the Y then paddled up the narrow slew back to the kayak dock.  Navionics app says I traveled 2.8 NM in 3 hours 34 minutes, max speed was 4.2 knots, average 0.8 knots.

At the dock I counted my blessings for still having agreeable weather.  My car thermometer showed 49 degrees.  Loaded the kayak, changed to street clothes just in time to miss another downpour.

The keel 2.0 worked well, maybe better than to be expected.  I felt like I had training wheels on, the kayak was so well behaved.  The keel also increased the waterline from around 7 feet to just under 10 feet.  Not really sure if it's noticeable but the theoretical hull speed should be increased from around 3.5 knots to 4.2 knots.

Had an un-eventful drive back to Portland and took advantage of the weather to do some storm watching before I left the coast.  Once home, checked my email and sure enough, the event had been canceled, I'd missed the memo.

John Purdy

 
 


Re: Beaver Creek Messabout Next Saturday, the 11th

John Purdy
 

I was going to let this slide, but today I got a message on my phone that a new "memory" has been added.  To my surprise it was a movie of pictures I had taken on the Beaver Creek Messabout on Jan 11th.

Was quite impressed by what the phone had done all by itself.  Figured out how to download the movie and made a Youtube video.

For your entertainment, here's a link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZJ-nYC1b8I

Now here's the commentary . . .

Early in the week my thoughts had turned to wanting to construct keel 2.0 on the white water kayak and try it out on the upcoming Beaver Creek Messabout on Saturday.  Anyone on the Halloween Yaquina River Float saw my attempts at keel 1.0.  I had wanted to adapt the white water boat to make it track a little straighter in flat water. Keel 1.0 was a complete failure. The kayak was just as squirrely with it as without it.  The deep rocker of the kayak kept most of what I had added in the bow and stern as keel 1.0 out of the water.

Thursday afternoon got busy with some ideas, more pine shelving boards, a tape measure, and a jigsaw. Constructed keel 2.0 pieces, gorilla glued and clamped them to keel 1.0 for a deeper longer keel.

After some course sanding and shaping I left for the Brian Booth State Park on Friday night, overnighting near Eugene, then driving the remaining distance Saturday morning.  I wondered if anyone would show up as I drove US 101 south from Newport with wipers on high and gusty buffeting winds tossing the car side to side.  It was really miserable out.

Arrived late at the kayak launch parking lot around 11:00 AM, pushoff was scheduled to be at 10.  There were no other cars in the lot so wondered if I was in the right place.  Inland the wind and rain had subsided. There was a hint of sunshine.  Unloaded the kayak, carried it down the path to the kayak launch dock.  Got changed and took a GPS point so I'd be sure to be able to find my way back.

Shoved off winding my way through the little byways to get to the main creek checking land marks and looking behind me so I would be able to recognize the path back.  Although it was cool, it was rather nice out.  Paddling down the main flow towards the ocean I noticed two things ahead.  1) A very low bridge for the Beaver Creek road I'd just driven up, and 2) Dark clouds moving in fast from the west.  I arrived at the bridge about the same time the sky opened up.  Rain poured all around for about 5 to 10 minutes while I stayed dry under the bridge.  That worked out nicely.

Further down the creek came to an empty refreshment stand.  Odd, never seen anything like this before.  A refreshment stand in a shack on stilts in the middle of the water.  The water level was about 15" above the floor inside.  The creek flowed north for about another half mile, then a big turn to the left went west towards the ocean.  At the turn I noticed that the water was flowing faster to the sea than it was an hour and a half earlier when I'd started.  The wind was picking up and the area much more exposed.  Being unfamiliar with the area and alone,  I didn't want to take a chance on the flow increasing further and making it harder to return, so I turned around short of sighting US 101 or the ocean.  The wind gave me a nice push and I made good time up stream.  Broke out my sandwich for lunch.  I'd take a bite, make a few strokes then take another bite.  Reached the Y that would take me back to the kayak dock and thought, what's up stream?  Still lots of daylight left so I paddled up stream to yet another low bridge.  This one too low to go under.  Looked like about a half a knot of current there.  I lazily rode the current back to the Y then paddled up the narrow slew back to the kayak dock.  Navionics app says I traveled 2.8 NM in 3 hours 34 minutes, max speed was 4.2 knots, average 0.8 knots.

At the dock I counted my blessings for still having agreeable weather.  My car thermometer showed 49 degrees.  Loaded the kayak, changed to street clothes just in time to miss another downpour.

The keel 2.0 worked well, maybe better than to be expected.  I felt like I had training wheels on, the kayak was so well behaved.  The keel also increased the waterline from around 7 feet to just under 10 feet.  Not really sure if it's noticeable but the theoretical hull speed should be increased from around 3.5 knots to 4.2 knots.

Had an un-eventful drive back to Portland and took advantage of the weather to do some storm watching before I left the coast.  Once home, checked my email and sure enough, the event had been canceled, I'd missed the memo.

John Purdy

 

 


Re: NEWS FLASH FROM THE SALISH 100...

elaineginader
 

This almost makes me wish I left Belle Starr in Olympia. Almost...


On Mon, Jan 20, 2020, 3:59 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
It was a fun potluck. :o) There was a slideshow running the whole time
showing photos of the boats that are signed up, and there are some
interesting new faces in amongst the familiar ones. 120 boats, not
counting the support boats! There's even an old Bayliner speedboat
signed up! I thought that was a joke, but Marty assured me that the boat
really is signed up. Probably nice people, even though they're "Bayliner
owners". Maybe that's too much of an inside Coot joke; I'll have to tell
the tale of little Jimmy at one of the Salish 100 stops. <g>

As you'd expect, the company at the feed was friendly and entertaining.
The food was Good and there was lots of it. Even Mary had fun:

https://kissestheearth.blogspot.com/

The absorption by the NWMC should be a Good Thing. The S100 will
probably become more "organized", but, judging by the R2AK and
Seventy48, I don't think they'll spoil the spirit of the S100. Dan Evans
is not only the Race Boss of the Race to Alaska and Seventy48, he's also
familiar to many of us as the Wooden Boat Festival Harbor Master. He'll
be doing the S100 in a 35' New Haven sharpie. Maybe this one (how many
can there be up there? <g>):

https://flic.kr/p/2hyD4ro

Although Marty didn't bring it up during his speechifying, the change to
stopping for the last night at Port Ludlow instead of Mats Mats Bay
sounds like a winner. That'll give us a good place for some last night
socializing.

It's gonna be a fun cruise! :o)

On 1/19/2020 9:57 AM, Marty wrote:
> EXCITING NEWS FOR THE SALISH 100 - First of all, it was great to see 60
> of this year's Salish 100 skippers and their wives, partners, kids and
> crew members at last night's first-ever Salish 100 potluck...a new
> tradition I'm sure we'll continue into the future.
> But the major news we shared with folks at the potluck is this: As
> organizers of the S-100, we are excited and proud to announce that the
> Salish 100 is joining the Race to Alaska and Seventy48 human-powered
> race under the umbrella of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port
> Townsend...an organization that is thrilled to be associated with our
> small-boat cruise and will do a great job of supporting the Salish 100
> into the future.
 > ...

--
John <jkohnen@...>
A society that gets rid of all its troublemakers goes downhill. (Robert
A. Heinlein)





Re: NEWS FLASH FROM THE SALISH 100...

 

It was a fun potluck. :o) There was a slideshow running the whole time showing photos of the boats that are signed up, and there are some interesting new faces in amongst the familiar ones. 120 boats, not counting the support boats! There's even an old Bayliner speedboat signed up! I thought that was a joke, but Marty assured me that the boat really is signed up. Probably nice people, even though they're "Bayliner owners". Maybe that's too much of an inside Coot joke; I'll have to tell the tale of little Jimmy at one of the Salish 100 stops. <g>

As you'd expect, the company at the feed was friendly and entertaining. The food was Good and there was lots of it. Even Mary had fun:

https://kissestheearth.blogspot.com/

The absorption by the NWMC should be a Good Thing. The S100 will probably become more "organized", but, judging by the R2AK and Seventy48, I don't think they'll spoil the spirit of the S100. Dan Evans is not only the Race Boss of the Race to Alaska and Seventy48, he's also familiar to many of us as the Wooden Boat Festival Harbor Master. He'll be doing the S100 in a 35' New Haven sharpie. Maybe this one (how many can there be up there? <g>):

https://flic.kr/p/2hyD4ro

Although Marty didn't bring it up during his speechifying, the change to stopping for the last night at Port Ludlow instead of Mats Mats Bay sounds like a winner. That'll give us a good place for some last night socializing.

It's gonna be a fun cruise! :o)

On 1/19/2020 9:57 AM, Marty wrote:
EXCITING NEWS FOR THE SALISH 100 - First of all, it was great to see 60 of this year's Salish 100 skippers and their wives, partners, kids and crew members at last night's first-ever Salish 100 potluck...a new tradition I'm sure we'll continue into the future.
But the major news we shared with folks at the potluck is this: As organizers of the S-100, we are excited and proud to announce that the Salish 100 is joining the Race to Alaska and Seventy48 human-powered race under the umbrella of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend...an organization that is thrilled to be associated with our small-boat cruise and will do a great job of supporting the Salish 100 into the future.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
A society that gets rid of all its troublemakers goes downhill. (Robert A. Heinlein)


NEWS FLASH FROM THE SALISH 100...

Marty
 

EXCITING NEWS FOR THE SALISH 100 - First of all, it was great to see 60 of this year's Salish 100 skippers and their wives, partners, kids and crew members at last night's first-ever Salish 100 potluck...a new tradition I'm sure we'll continue into the future.
 
But the major news we shared with folks at the potluck is this: As organizers of the S-100, we are excited and proud to announce that the Salish 100 is joining the Race to Alaska and Seventy48 human-powered race under the umbrella of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend...an organization that is thrilled to be associated with our small-boat cruise and will do a great job of supporting the Salish 100 into the future.
 
This year's Salish 100 will be transitional, since our Port Townsend Pocket Yachters' volunteer team has already done 90% of the organizing, but we will immediately begin transferring some responsibilities to the NWMC. (For instance, Anika Colvin of the Northwest Maritime Center staff, who designed logos for the R2AK and Seventy48, will create a new logo for the Salish 100—and the NWMC will handle production of S-100 burgees that'll go to all skippers this year, along with some apparel designs that'll be produced in support of our small-boat cruise.
 
Daniel Evans, Race Boss of the Race to Alaska and Seventy48, will take the lead in coordinating future runnings of the Salish 100, but many of the day-to-day organizing efforts will continue to be handled by volunteers from within the ranks of the Pocket Yachters--now volunteering for the NWMC. (Daniel, who's spent most of his life on the water and who personally owns a classic 20-foot sharpie, will participate in this year's Salish 100 using a larger New Haven Sharpie belonging to NWMC's executive director Jake Beattie. Along the route from Olympia to Port Townsend, a number of NWMC staff members will have opportunities to crew aboard the sharpie and, in the process, become more personally familiar with the S-100...all good in helping build a strong bond between the Salish 100 and the NWMC staff. Jake, by the way, would love to have sailed the S-100 himself, but he'll be stuck in Utah, taking part in a long-planned family rafting adventure.)
 
So, here's a press release on the marriage between the Salish 100 and the Northwest Maritime Center, being distributed to all of you ahead of various media outlets. - Marty Loken
 
Beyond R2AK and Seventy48:
SALISH 100 BECOMES A
NORTHWEST MARITIME CENTER EVENT
Salish 100—the largest organized small-boat cruise in North America—is coming under the umbrella of the Northwest Maritime Center (NWMC) and complementing the center’s diverse array of programs.
Created by the Port Townsend Pocket Yachters club, the Salish 100 (S-100) joins the Race to Alaska (R2AK) and Seventy48 human-powered race as three of the most unique and vibrant water-borne events in the Pacific Northwest. Salish 100’s second annual cruise will take place July 10-17, with more than 135 boats voyaging 100 nautical miles—the full length of Puget Sound—from Olympia to Port Townsend, Wash.
Volunteers from the Pocket Yachters will continue to help organize the small-boat cruise during this year’s second running, but the NWMC’s Daniel Evans, Race Boss for the R2AK and Seventy48, will assume oversight of the Salish 100. Marty Loken, founding organizer, said he and other volunteers look forward to the new relationship with the NWMC. “We’ve had the best kind of partnership with the Maritime Center for years,” Loken said, “starting nine years ago with our annual Pocket Yacht Palooza, hosted by the NWMC. Success of the Salish 100 has outstripped all expectations, and we think the Maritime Center is the perfect home for the event, assuring it’ll continue to be properly supported and organized into the future.”
Jake Beattie, executive director of the NWMC, is thrilled to see the popular small-boat cruise become part of the Northwest Maritime Center, whose vision is to create powerful connections. “You can’t sail, row or paddle 100 miles without learning more about boat-handling and the marine environment,” said Beattie, “along with your own personal limits, how to deal with different wind and weather conditions and the natural world of Puget Sound. The Salish 100 isn’t a race, like some of our other events, so it’s a perfect complement to the R2AK, Seventy48 and the NWMC’s other on-the-water offerings.”
Co-sponsors of this year’s Salish 100 will include the Port Townsend Pocket Yachters, Small Craft Advisor magazine, Duckworks Boat Builder’s Supply, Kingston Mercantile & Marine, The Artful Sailor, Gig Harbor BoatShop, and the Ports of Olympia, Kingston, and Port Ludlow.
The fleet of small boats taking part in the S-100 will range from 11-foot, 11-inch SCAMP sailboats, to dozens of rowing-sailing Whitehalls, wherries, sharpies, melonseeds and flatiron skiffs, to a variety of smaller production sailboats including Montgomery 15s and 17s, West Wight Potters and others … along with dozens of home-built sailing-rowing boats designed by John Welsford, Iain Oughtred, Chesapeake Light Craft and many others. (Participating in the S-100, in fact, will be designer John Welsford—coming all the way from New Zealand.)
Along the route, small-boat skippers from 14 states and two foreign countries will experience everything the Salish Sea has to offer: currents racing through narrow channels, tide rips, sandbars, rocky shores, wonderfully protected anchorages, wind conditions ranging from flat calm to small-craft warnings, encounters with wildlife (last year a pod of orcas glided through the fleet near Bainbridge Island), and some new friendships that will last a lifetime. Many of the participants venture from inland states to experience saltwater boating—tidal ranges of up to 14 feet—for the first time. Others drive thousands of miles to attend. (Last year young Rachel Doss covered 2,200 miles to take part aboard her 13-foot Guppy sailboat.)
“The Maritime Center is the perfect landing spot for the Salish 100,” says Daniel Evans, “Its culture, current events and mission to provide maritime experiences throughout the region dovetail beautifully with the celebration, camaraderie and skill found within the Salish 100 fleet.”
Registration for this year’s Salish 100 is full, but for more information or to get on the mailing list contact the NWMC at communications@.... Boaters can also check out the Salish 100 Facebook page, where participants share photos and their experiences before, during, and after each cruise.


Re: Help with a Hobie Cat

Case Turner
 

They should get in touch with Hobie fleet 72 in PDX.

There is also a place in Hood River (can’t remember the name) that offers Hobie lessons and classes on rigging sailing etc.

Case

Sent from not here

On Jan 17, 2020, at 12:56 AM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

Some friends of Mary's have acquired a Hobie 16 for use on Fern Ridge. They want a tutorial (or maybe two) on how to rig it, and maybe a sailing lesson or two. They moght even be willing to compensate a helper for their time.

If anyone is interested, or knows someone who might be, email me and I'll give you their contact info.

--
John <@Jkohnen>
If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River, the headline that afternoon would read "President Can't Swim.” (Lyndon Johnson)




Help with a Hobie Cat

 

Some friends of Mary's have acquired a Hobie 16 for use on Fern Ridge. They want a tutorial (or maybe two) on how to rig it, and maybe a sailing lesson or two. They moght even be willing to compensate a helper for their time.

If anyone is interested, or knows someone who might be, email me and I'll give you their contact info.

--
John <@Jkohnen>
If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River, the headline that afternoon would read "President Can't Swim.” (Lyndon Johnson)


Re: Borden's Glue

Richard Green
 

Heavy sigh, I remember right outa high school pulling on the dry chain at a local sawmill.  We 8’ and 10’  piled up at the end of the chain, we pulled two foot increments of 2 by 4’s from 12’s up to 24’ of nice looking boards.  

Rich 

On Jan 16, 2020, at 8:24 PM, Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

John,

I was thinking that if I had to scarf some 2x4's or 2x6's I would lay them out on blocks so I could clamp them from the bottom and cut the scarf with a track saw.  I would finish up the cut with an hand saw and hand plane.  I have not had the need yet but maybe in the future.

Randy


Re: Borden's Glue

Randy Torgerson
 

John,

I was thinking that if I had to scarf some 2x4's or 2x6's I would lay them out on blocks so I could clamp them from the bottom and cut the scarf with a track saw.  I would finish up the cut with an hand saw and hand plane.  I have not had the need yet but maybe in the future.

Randy


Cleaning up, Not Boat but !!!

Electri-Cal
 

Oops, can't find photo add part of the note..  This HP chromebook has a different user system, which is not as intuitive as other systems.  Buy, it is way fast, way easier at some stuff, I need to get back to Winco and ask about photo stuff.  

Later,  Cal


Re: Borden's Glue

 

Thanks, Randy. That's more like it. Yeah, cutting both pieces at the same time cancels out any little errors in alignment or blade angle. I've been thinking about a jig (or would it be a fixture? I never can keep that straight) for using a handheld circular saw, so I don't need to clean such a wide behind the tablesaw. <g> I made a jig/fixture for a power hand plane last time, for the same reason, but I now think the saw would work better.

On 1/13/2020 9:05 PM, Randy T wrote:
The first photo on my previous post did not come across correctly, here it is again.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
The unrestricted competition so commonly advocated does not leave us the survival of the fittest. The unscrupulous succeed best in accumulating wealth. (Rutherford B. Hayes)


Cleaning up, Not Boat but !!!

Electri-Cal
 

I have been asked to "let me know" if I decide to close out a couple collectable firearms, so this I the first photo of my personal favorite, LOW serial number RUGER .45 long Colt, 3 screw and less than #200 serial number.  I had it Pro built in L.A back in the early 70's.  Target accuracy, deer legal and has been in my house unfired for the last 30 years.  Not fired since we moved back, and were here maybe 2 years.  You will never see one lik this rare 3 screw model, and I have a bunch of ammo I throw in for free with  it.  It's twin -- yes I had 2 made, the other was shorter  barreled, this 11 in.one is just flat amazing.  The other .45 long Colt SA went right away, as have some other guns.

I have a .22 scoped Ruger, again not the nylon very ordinary one, but this one is the First Edition, a super fine  Mannlecher stock rotary 22,.  Hasn't been made for decades, also a collectable, used lightly maybe less than 300 rounds, also comes with several boxes of ammo , good scope and carry case.   Again, not ued for the majority of the past 30 years

Black powder .45 cal. Thompson Center "pirate styled" octagon barreled pistol, cap fired not flint !!  ---  MMatching TC 50- cal. octagon barreled Kentucky long rifle, with rare "flip up" target period sights.   All like new, all in great shape, ammo and cases. 

Thanks Coots, let me know if you are interested,  Cal Drake                       details on contacting me are on the Coots membership list !



FULL reloading RCBS bench set up, dies for maybe 10 or so calibers, plus powder, shotgun press loader, pellets, cleaners, bullets, primers  everything needed to reload a lot of stuff, could pare it down, sell the dies seperate, Caps, bullets, powder, could go with it.  Books on the different proceedures also here.   I will look up prices if somebodys interested, or let the web do that for me.  

Several archery set ups, target,  two barebows  (Bear ) and compound (very early Jennings )  some arrows, gear etc.  Most legal for archery season, if you are !!!  I'm a paper puncher, or was back in the day.  

Not doing prices until the items are shown to a buyer are looked over, and not waiting long before I put them on line.  Pretty easy to do that, but I can save around 25% by having a local buyer.  This is a first offer for coots, yeah I can hold whatever you like till wanted, with a deposit.  Comes the spring weather, this will all be gone.  Just thought some might like to do more shooting, without the hassle. 









Re: Coot Volcano Alert

 

Thanks, Chuck! I'm glad Michael's place is outside the danger zone. I hope the Geese (I always think of them as Gooses <g>) and their builders owners, along with the other people evacuated from around lake Ta'al, get through this ordeal alright.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/14/asia/philippines-volcano-taal-eruption-intl-hnk/index.html

On 1/13/2020 1:07 PM, Chuck the Duck wrote:
I just heard from Michael. He has been in Australia since Christmas.
Here is what he said when I asked if he was in any danger:

We chose a place outside the historic danger and buffer zones.

Even the ash and mud rain is blowing in the opposite direction.

Am a bit worried about 30 geese. The residents down there have all
been evacuated.


The Geese he refers to are the boats that the folks who live around Lake
Taal (the volcano is in the middle of the lake) have been building and
sailing on the lake.
On 1/13/2020 12:37 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
I think Mik Storer lives and has the sailmaking business near Ta'al Lake, where the volcano erupted. He does projects with the Yacht Club there, anyway.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-51086961
http://www.tlyc.com/
https://flic.kr/p/74Gbjq
He's probably in no danger, unless he goes sightseeing to the island <g>, but it's still a disaster for those nearby, and could get worse.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Familiarity breeds contempt. How accurate that is. The reason we hold truth in such respect is because we have so little opportunity to get familiar with it. (Mark Twain)


Re: [TSCA-Puget] Salish 100 Group

 

Thanks, Bob. To subscribe to the new group all you have to do is send an empty email to:

salish100+subscribe@groups.io

On 1/14/2020 8:04 AM, Bob M wrote:
If you're interested in the Salish 100, a new discussion group has been formed:


For participants or those interested in the Salish 100, an annual multi-day cruise-in-company throughout various parts of the Salish Sea. The event is chiefly sponsored by the Northwest Maritime Center and the Port Townsend Pocket Yachters, both located in Port Townsend, Washington. It currently accommodates 100+ small craft approximately 23' and under (sail, power, and oars/paddle). One to two dozen larger support boats accompany the fleet. In 2020 we will be traversing 100 nautical miles from Olympia to Port Townsend in 7 days, July 10 to July 16.  
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--
John <jkohnen@...>
The habit of reading is the only enjoyment in which there is no alloy; it lasts when all other pleasures fade. (Anthony Trollope)


Re: Salish 100 Group

Richard Green
 

Thanks, Bob.

Rich

On Jan 14, 2020, at 8:04 AM, Bob Miller <rmiller43@...> wrote:

If you're interested in the Salish 100, a new discussion group has been formed:


For participants or those interested in the Salish 100, an annual multi-day cruise-in-company throughout various parts of the Salish Sea. The event is chiefly sponsored by the Northwest Maritime Center and the Port Townsend Pocket Yachters, both located in Port Townsend, Washington. It currently accommodates 100+ small craft approximately 23' and under (sail, power, and oars/paddle). One to two dozen larger support boats accompany the fleet. In 2020 we will be traversing 100 nautical miles from Olympia to Port Townsend in 7 days, July 10 to July 16.  


Salish 100 Group

Bob Miller
 

If you're interested in the Salish 100, a new discussion group has been formed:


For participants or those interested in the Salish 100, an annual multi-day cruise-in-company throughout various parts of the Salish Sea. The event is chiefly sponsored by the Northwest Maritime Center and the Port Townsend Pocket Yachters, both located in Port Townsend, Washington. It currently accommodates 100+ small craft approximately 23' and under (sail, power, and oars/paddle). One to two dozen larger support boats accompany the fleet. In 2020 we will be traversing 100 nautical miles from Olympia to Port Townsend in 7 days, July 10 to July 16.  


Re: Borden's Glue

Randy Torgerson
 

The first photo on my previous post did not come across correctly, here it is again.

Randy


Re: Heavy Duty Sewing Machine Needed

Vince K.
 

The Sailrite Ultrafeed machines are pretty good for the money and are portable. 
Go to https://www.sailrite.com/Sewing-Machines/Portable-Heavy-Duty-Sewing-Machines/Ultrafeed-LS-1-Sewing-Machine
I have the LSZ-1 and it works pretty good. 
Sailrite is pretty good about standing behind their products.  
They are very user maintainable machines with lots of instructional videos on adjustments and repairs. 
Parts and accessories are very available at reasonable prices. 

I also have a Seiko made Consew 206 triple feed machine that I've thought of selling. 
In addition to walking foot it has a needle feed. 
That means the needle actually pulls the fabric along with the walking foot. 
That would run about $900 with table etc

I'm in Spokane near Dan Rogers who is a very active Coots member. 
Used to live near Portland. 

If you have questions about industrial machines just ask me. 

Vince Kurpan


Re: Borden's Glue

Randy Torgerson
 

John,
 
Ok, you asked for it. 
 
 
I clamp two pieces of wood to the jig; cutting them at the same time reduces errors from slop since I am only using one slot to guide the jig.   When I make the cut I am standing to the left of the work and pushing the jig to the right (very important for a good cut to have consistent pressure).  My left hand is on the knob and the right is holding the jib behind the second clamp.  My hands are never in line with the saw blade.


I marked the danger area to remind me where the saw blade will be.  


A screw on the end of the guide strip stops the jig from going too far.  For long strips I have rollers mounted on saw horses to support the far ends of the strips.  The scarfing jig was originally made for my Delta table saw and I had to modify ti for my new saw.  I have used this jig to make the strips for a birdsmouth mast, the cedar strips and the gunwales on my strip canoe (still in progress after more than ten years and many moves) and a few other minor projects.

For the SOF Katydidn't, I was planning to ask you and Mark N to join me on a jaunt at Toledo to see how well she can carry three coots. ;)

Randy