Date   

Salish 100 Group

Bob Miller
 

If you're interested in the Salish 100, a new discussion group has been formed:


For participants or those interested in the Salish 100, an annual multi-day cruise-in-company throughout various parts of the Salish Sea. The event is chiefly sponsored by the Northwest Maritime Center and the Port Townsend Pocket Yachters, both located in Port Townsend, Washington. It currently accommodates 100+ small craft approximately 23' and under (sail, power, and oars/paddle). One to two dozen larger support boats accompany the fleet. In 2020 we will be traversing 100 nautical miles from Olympia to Port Townsend in 7 days, July 10 to July 16.  


Re: Borden's Glue

Randy Torgerson
 

The first photo on my previous post did not come across correctly, here it is again.

Randy


Re: Heavy Duty Sewing Machine Needed

Vince K.
 

The Sailrite Ultrafeed machines are pretty good for the money and are portable. 
Go to https://www.sailrite.com/Sewing-Machines/Portable-Heavy-Duty-Sewing-Machines/Ultrafeed-LS-1-Sewing-Machine
I have the LSZ-1 and it works pretty good. 
Sailrite is pretty good about standing behind their products.  
They are very user maintainable machines with lots of instructional videos on adjustments and repairs. 
Parts and accessories are very available at reasonable prices. 

I also have a Seiko made Consew 206 triple feed machine that I've thought of selling. 
In addition to walking foot it has a needle feed. 
That means the needle actually pulls the fabric along with the walking foot. 
That would run about $900 with table etc

I'm in Spokane near Dan Rogers who is a very active Coots member. 
Used to live near Portland. 

If you have questions about industrial machines just ask me. 

Vince Kurpan


Re: Borden's Glue

Randy Torgerson
 

John,
 
Ok, you asked for it. 
 
 
I clamp two pieces of wood to the jig; cutting them at the same time reduces errors from slop since I am only using one slot to guide the jig.   When I make the cut I am standing to the left of the work and pushing the jig to the right (very important for a good cut to have consistent pressure).  My left hand is on the knob and the right is holding the jib behind the second clamp.  My hands are never in line with the saw blade.


I marked the danger area to remind me where the saw blade will be.  


A screw on the end of the guide strip stops the jig from going too far.  For long strips I have rollers mounted on saw horses to support the far ends of the strips.  The scarfing jig was originally made for my Delta table saw and I had to modify ti for my new saw.  I have used this jig to make the strips for a birdsmouth mast, the cedar strips and the gunwales on my strip canoe (still in progress after more than ten years and many moves) and a few other minor projects.

For the SOF Katydidn't, I was planning to ask you and Mark N to join me on a jaunt at Toledo to see how well she can carry three coots. ;)

Randy


Re: Coot Volcano Alert

cherrill boissonou
 

Yo John,....is this how I’m supposed to reply?....Technophobe Earl.

On Jan 13, 2020, at 12:37 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

I think Mik Storer lives and has the sailmaking business near Ta'al Lake, where the volcano erupted. He does projects with the Yacht Club there, anyway.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-51086961

http://www.tlyc.com/

https://flic.kr/p/74Gbjq

He's probably in no danger, unless he goes sightseeing to the island <g>, but it's still a disaster for those nearby, and could get worse.

--
John <@Jkohnen>
Skepticism, like chastity, should not be relinquished too readily. (George Santayana)




Heavy Duty Sewing Machine Needed

 

We gotta teach Earl how eo post his own messages here. ;o) John E, out by Airlie, is finishing up a long, lean cruising motorboat. I'll post some photos of it soon.

"John Engbring is looking to borrow or buy a used heavy duty sewing machine to do his boat cushions and other items. Who might he contact in the coots group, or other outlets?"

--
John <@Jkohnen>
Half of the harm that is done in this world is due to people who want to feel important. They don't mean to do harm but the harm does not interest them. (T. S. Eliot)


The Fog Lifts (was: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations)

 

Got 'em fine this time, Julius. Very nice shots! :o) I like moody, misty and moist photos. That's why I'm having so much trouble choosing which photos of the rainy sail-by at Port Townsend to put online. <g> But I was expecting photos of tubes of goo and wood strips. ;o)

https://groups.io/g/oregoncoots/photo/0/0?p=Created,,,20,2,0,0

https://groups.io/g/oregoncoots/photo/0/1?p=Created,,,20,2,0,0

https://groups.io/g/oregoncoots/photo/0/2?p=Created,,,20,2,0,0

On 1/13/2020 11:55 AM, Julius wrote:
OK!
I should never mess around with the web. As the internet continues to decay, no manner of ‘stuff’ may occur.
The previous incomplete e-mail showed two nondescript images.
So hopefully the above three photos complete the picture (npi).
The far right image shows something coming out of the fog. Second image – there it is! Third – sun is out!
This sequence was taken standing at River’s edge over an amazingly short time period.
Not responsible what the viewer may receive.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assaults of thoughts on the unthinking. (John Maynard Keynes)


Re: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

 

I've been happy with Rodda "latex" house paint on Lazy Jack, and I had the Retired Old Geezers use it on Whimsy.

On 1/13/2020 10:40 AM, Rich G wrote:
When I finished Jaunty I used standard (?) ablative bottom paint to the water line.  Above the water line I used Rodda 100% acrylic house paint over similar primer.  Worked like a champ, easy to do small repairs as scuffs, etc, easy to keep clean.  I put it on with a typical 1/2” house roller and all in all was very happy with it.  Worked like a charm.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Training is everything. The peach was once a bitter almond; cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education. (Mark Twain)


Re: Borden's Glue

 

Can you show us your scarfing jig, Randy? We don't care if it's ugly. <g> The concept is easy to understand, but I'd like to see how you executed it.

I look forward to seeing your SOF Katydidn't, and maybe even giving it a try. Once you get started I'll bet it won't take you long to build it.

On 1/12/2020 9:18 PM, Randy T wrote:
 Andrew,
Like John said a SOF Katydidn't doesn't need anything over 8 feet and I have all the wood I will need in my wood shed. ...
As for scarfing, I have a really ugly table saw jig that works wonderfully; if I had known how well it would work, I would have made it look better.
I have mostly convinced myself to do the SOF Kattydidn't once I get the canoe out of the garage.  I won't have the Tolman ready for any of the boat shows but maybe  I will have a SOF pram to show.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
When we all think alike, we don't need to think much at all. (Walt Whitman)


Coot Volcano Alert

 

I think Mik Storer lives and has the sailmaking business near Ta'al Lake, where the volcano erupted. He does projects with the Yacht Club there, anyway.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-51086961

http://www.tlyc.com/

https://flic.kr/p/74Gbjq

He's probably in no danger, unless he goes sightseeing to the island <g>, but it's still a disaster for those nearby, and could get worse.

--
John <@Jkohnen>
Skepticism, like chastity, should not be relinquished too readily. (George Santayana)


Re: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

Julius Dalzell
 

OK!

I should never mess around with the web. As the internet continues to decay, no manner of ‘stuff’ may occur.

The previous incomplete e-mail showed two nondescript images.

So hopefully the above three photos complete the picture (npi).

The far right image shows something coming out of the fog. Second image – there it is! Third – sun is out!

This sequence was taken standing at River’s edge over an amazingly short time period.

Not responsible what the viewer may receive.

Julius

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Julius Dalzell
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 10:08 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

 

Work with Brightside frequently. VOC’s are intolerable for me. Fully masked for the moment the can is opened!

However I have noted that the VOC loadings have substantially lessened over the past year ort so.

Th manufactures are well aware of the negatives and constantly work on chemistries to achieve improvements.

Julius

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Electri-Cal
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 8:03 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

 

You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.

 

Lter Coots,   Cal

 

PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 

 

 

 

 

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.

 

Randy


 

--

Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal

 

 


Re: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

Richard Green
 

By the way, I used Kiwigrip for nonskid, loved the simplicity of the application over masked areas, color built in, worked like a charm with very comfortable nonskid.

Rich

On Jan 13, 2020, at 10:05 AM, Julius Dalzell <jndalzell@...> wrote:

Work with Brightside frequently. VOC’s are intolerable for me. Fully masked for the moment the can is opened!
However I have noted that the VOC loadings have substantially lessened over the past year ort so.
Th manufactures are well aware of the negatives and constantly work on chemistries to achieve improvements.
Julius
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
From: Electri-Cal
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 8:03 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations
 
You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.
 
Lter Coots,   Cal
 
PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 
 
 
 
 
On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.
 
Randy

 
--
Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal

 
<B3DEF9492CEF4CED930991D950FC98C7.png><3799CA652C1744338E9CD1179ED98FF0.png>


Re: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

Richard Green
 

When I finished Jaunty I used standard (?) ablative bottom paint to the water line.  Above the water line I used Rodda 100% acrylic house paint over similar primer.  Worked like a champ, easy to do small repairs as scuffs, etc, easy to keep clean.  I put it on with a typical 1/2” house roller and all in all was very happy with it.  Worked like a charm.

Rich

On Jan 13, 2020, at 10:05 AM, Julius Dalzell <jndalzell@...> wrote:

Work with Brightside frequently. VOC’s are intolerable for me. Fully masked for the moment the can is opened!
However I have noted that the VOC loadings have substantially lessened over the past year ort so.
Th manufactures are well aware of the negatives and constantly work on chemistries to achieve improvements.
Julius
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
From: Electri-Cal
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 8:03 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations
 
You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.
 
Lter Coots,   Cal
 
PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 
 
 
 
 
On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.
 
Randy

 
--
Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal

 
<B3DEF9492CEF4CED930991D950FC98C7.png><3799CA652C1744338E9CD1179ED98FF0.png>


Re: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

Julius Dalzell
 

Work with Brightside frequently. VOC’s are intolerable for me. Fully masked for the moment the can is opened!

However I have noted that the VOC loadings have substantially lessened over the past year ort so.

Th manufactures are well aware of the negatives and constantly work on chemistries to achieve improvements.

Julius

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Electri-Cal
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 8:03 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

 

You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.

 

Lter Coots,   Cal

 

PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 

 

 

 

 

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.

 

Randy


 

--

Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal

 


Re: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

Electri-Cal
 

You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.

Lter Coots,   Cal

PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 




On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:
RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.


Randy



--
Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal


Re: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

Randy Torgerson
 

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.


Randy


Re: Borden's Glue

Randy Torgerson
 

 Andrew,

Like John said a SOF Katydidn't doesn't need anything over 8 feet and I have all the wood I will need in my wood shed.  If I need long clear boards quickly I agree that they are expensive, if I have time there are several lumber yards in Tacoma that have CVG Doug Fir and clear Alaska Yellow Cedar that is priced better than what I can get in Portland.  Over the next few months I expect to see lumber cut from salvaged trees that come down in the storms.  Urban lumber is hit or miss but sometime you can get a deal.

As for scarfing, I have a really ugly table saw jig that works wonderfully; if I had known how well it would work, I would have made it look better. 

I have mostly convinced myself to do the SOF Kattydidn't once I get the canoe out of the garage.  I won't have the Tolman ready for any of the boat shows but maybe  I will have a SOF pram to show.

Randy


Re: Borden's Glue

Randy Torgerson
 

John,

Looks like a good place for all kinds of wood.  I have always wanted to build some furniture out of Madrone.

I watched a couple of Geodesic Airolite Boats video's on Youtube; I found them interesting but I like the modern "traditional" style of skin-on-frame boats.  Robert Morris in Building Skin-On-Frame Boats uses air dried Alaskan Yellow Cedar for the steam bent ribs so I am going to try to do the same.  I have a 14 inch wide board of Port Orford Cedar that has been air dried that I might use for the transoms.

Randy


Re: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

 

Earl's three cents worth on Gorilla Construction Adhesive:

"Gorilla Puke

"I tried it ONCE and it made me nauseous and induced a headache. Regardless of it’s strengths, I would avoid it as so many other products are much more enjoyable and safer to use. My 3 cents worth."

Doesn't jibe with their claims of low odor and VOC compliance, but maybe Earl has a particular sensitivity to it...


https://www.gorillatough.com/product/gorilla-construction-adhesive-3/

https://www.gorillatough.com/product/gorilla-heavy-duty-construction-adhesive/

--
John <@Jkohnen>
And I tell you, we are here on Earth to fart around, and don't let anybody tell you any different. (Kurt Vonnegut)


Re: Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

 

Which one of these, Dan? How does it compare to PL Premium in price, and why is it better?

https://www.gorillatough.com/product/gorilla-construction-adhesive-3/

https://www.gorillatough.com/product/gorilla-heavy-duty-construction-adhesive/

https://www.loctiteproducts.com/en/products/build/construction-adhesives/loctite_pl_premiumpolyurethaneconstructionadhesive.html

The quotes I put at the bottom of my emails are just for entertainment, and to provoke thought. Lord Peter's aphorism seems to have stirred Dan's little gray cells a bit. <g>

On 1/11/2020 9:04 PM, Dan in Almostcanada wrote:
After years of using PL Premium, for just about everything. I’ve stated buying an armload of Gorilla Glue Construction Cement this past couple boats.  Kinda like poorman’s Sikaflex.  No substitute for ‘pox, of course.  But, I find I use it for more and more stuff alluhtime.  Lots of edge and face gluing of mdo sheet material for example.  Also, as a bedding compound on deck fittings.  Way less messy than the high dollar clear silicone.
John, today’s quote by Lord Whimsy does put you in hoist-upon- one’s-own-petard territory.  Rhetorically, if not factually…  Dan.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
I HATE quotation. Tell me what you know. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)