Date   
Mailing Photos Question

jim reim
 

I have some Halloween Float photos to share. 
When I follow the instructions for sharing photos on Flickr's website I get a message that says "There was am error sharing on Flickr.  Please try again."  Any advice?

Jim R

Re: A Coot Published Author and a Coot Published Photographer

Brandon
 

Me too. I have the lead article in this month’s Good Old Boat magazine: a review of a Cape George Cutter 38. 

Brandon 
SV Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43



Re: Salish 100

Bob Miller
 

I'll be on my venerable Drascombe Longboat (21' 9"), "Sally Forth." She's a veteran of cruising the Sound, San Juans, and the Canadian Gulf Islands. Seen below crossing the Strait of Juan de Fuca. She always likes company.

Cheers,
Bob

On Sun, Nov 3, 2019 at 1:09 AM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I noticed that you signed up and were accepted too, Bob, I but I don't
recall what boat you're taking. Can you enlighten us?

On 11/2/2019 2:17 PM, PT Bob M wrote:
> John -
>
> You will be missed if you don't sign up. There is always room for you.
>

--
John (jkohnen@...)
Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday. (Don Marquis)




Re: Salish 100

 

I hope you and Riptide will be able to do more of the course next time.

Other notables signed up and accepted for the next S100 are Retired Old Geezers Toledo Joe Novello, in Good Girl, the Neptune 16 he got from Andrew, and Keith Korporaal in a small boat I didn't recognize. I hope they get that bpat they're building for me done by then. ;o)

On 11/2/2019 4:08 PM, Pete L wrote:
They must have gotten the length wrong, John, RIPTIDE is 48 feet with her swim step. Come on, sign up, willya? (G). S/ Pete
--
John (@Jkohnen)
Dissent is what rescues democracy from a quiet death behind closed doors. (Lewis H. Lapham)

Re: Salish 100

 

I noticed that you signed up and were accepted too, Bob, I but I don't recall what boat you're taking. Can you enlighten us?

On 11/2/2019 2:17 PM, PT Bob M wrote:
John -
You will be missed if you don't sign up. There is always room for you.
--
John (@Jkohnen)
Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday. (Don Marquis)

Re: Salish 100 (was: A Coot Published Author and a Coot Published Photographer)

Pete Leenhouts
 

They must have gotten the length wrong, John, RIPTIDE is 48 feet with her swim step. Come on, sign up, willya? (G). S/ Pete

Sent from a mobile device;
Please pardon my brevity!

On Nov 2, 2019, at 2:17 PM, Bob Miller <rmiller43@...> wrote:

John - 

You will be missed if you don't sign up. There is always room for you.

Cheers,
Bob

On Sat, Nov 2, 2019 at 12:58 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Some of us Coots are thinking about doing a cruise of our own on the
Salish Sea next year instead of the Salish 100. But, after seeing
something on the Woodenboat Forum,I put on some nitrile gloves, put a
clothes pin on my nose, and took a look at the Salish 100 F******k group
to see who's signed up for S100 #2. Lots of familiar names...

John Harris of CLC, a Real Boat Nut from childhood.

John Welsford, Kiwi boat designer and all around Good Guy, is gonna be
sailing Scamp #1.

Joe Grez of Electric Paddle is doing it again in the solar runabout Swe'
Pea.

Dan Pence is doing it again in the electric launch Ginger.

I'm pleased to see that they're letting Bob Van Putten do it again in
his 11' skiff. His was one of the least capable boats in S100 #1, but he
was a real good sport.

https://flic.kr/p/2gJq63c

Bo Neill will be there with the 26' Bartender, Glencannon.

https://flic.kr/p/2gGRfEB

Pete Leenhouts is signed up in a 28' cruiser. What's that about, Pete?
Not Riptide?

Many more familiar and unfamiliar names and boats, quite a few repeat
offenders. 100 so far...

I do plan on going to the Pocket Yacht Palooza next year, and maybe I'll
go early and meet the S100 fleet as they approach Port Townsend. Or, who
knows? I may sign up late for the S100 and hope they let me in. <g>

On 11/2/2019 5:04 AM, Pete L wrote:
> Thanks for the heads-up, John, for a great article! Having been aboard,
> even briefly, one somehow feels a kinship with DR PETRA and her owner -
> and she is definitely a good-looking boat all around. I hope we see her
> during the 2020 Salish-100! s/Pete Leenhouts

--
John (jkohnen@...)
Nothing produces such odd results as trying to get even. (Franklin P. Jones)




Re: Salish 100 (was: A Coot Published Author and a Coot Published Photographer)

Bob Miller
 

John - 

You will be missed if you don't sign up. There is always room for you.

Cheers,
Bob

On Sat, Nov 2, 2019 at 12:58 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Some of us Coots are thinking about doing a cruise of our own on the
Salish Sea next year instead of the Salish 100. But, after seeing
something on the Woodenboat Forum,I put on some nitrile gloves, put a
clothes pin on my nose, and took a look at the Salish 100 F******k group
to see who's signed up for S100 #2. Lots of familiar names...

John Harris of CLC, a Real Boat Nut from childhood.

John Welsford, Kiwi boat designer and all around Good Guy, is gonna be
sailing Scamp #1.

Joe Grez of Electric Paddle is doing it again in the solar runabout Swe'
Pea.

Dan Pence is doing it again in the electric launch Ginger.

I'm pleased to see that they're letting Bob Van Putten do it again in
his 11' skiff. His was one of the least capable boats in S100 #1, but he
was a real good sport.

https://flic.kr/p/2gJq63c

Bo Neill will be there with the 26' Bartender, Glencannon.

https://flic.kr/p/2gGRfEB

Pete Leenhouts is signed up in a 28' cruiser. What's that about, Pete?
Not Riptide?

Many more familiar and unfamiliar names and boats, quite a few repeat
offenders. 100 so far...

I do plan on going to the Pocket Yacht Palooza next year, and maybe I'll
go early and meet the S100 fleet as they approach Port Townsend. Or, who
knows? I may sign up late for the S100 and hope they let me in. <g>

On 11/2/2019 5:04 AM, Pete L wrote:
> Thanks for the heads-up, John, for a great article! Having been aboard,
> even briefly, one somehow feels a kinship with DR PETRA and her owner -
> and she is definitely a good-looking boat all around. I hope we see her
> during the 2020 Salish-100! s/Pete Leenhouts

--
John (jkohnen@...)
Nothing produces such odd results as trying to get even. (Franklin P. Jones)




Salish 100 (was: A Coot Published Author and a Coot Published Photographer)

 

Some of us Coots are thinking about doing a cruise of our own on the Salish Sea next year instead of the Salish 100. But, after seeing something on the Woodenboat Forum,I put on some nitrile gloves, put a clothes pin on my nose, and took a look at the Salish 100 F******k group to see who's signed up for S100 #2. Lots of familiar names...

John Harris of CLC, a Real Boat Nut from childhood.

John Welsford, Kiwi boat designer and all around Good Guy, is gonna be sailing Scamp #1.

Joe Grez of Electric Paddle is doing it again in the solar runabout Swe' Pea.

Dan Pence is doing it again in the electric launch Ginger.

I'm pleased to see that they're letting Bob Van Putten do it again in his 11' skiff. His was one of the least capable boats in S100 #1, but he was a real good sport.

https://flic.kr/p/2gJq63c

Bo Neill will be there with the 26' Bartender, Glencannon.

https://flic.kr/p/2gGRfEB

Pete Leenhouts is signed up in a 28' cruiser. What's that about, Pete? Not Riptide?

Many more familiar and unfamiliar names and boats, quite a few repeat offenders. 100 so far...

I do plan on going to the Pocket Yacht Palooza next year, and maybe I'll go early and meet the S100 fleet as they approach Port Townsend. Or, who knows? I may sign up late for the S100 and hope they let me in. <g>

On 11/2/2019 5:04 AM, Pete L wrote:
Thanks for the heads-up, John, for a great article! Having been aboard, even briefly, one somehow feels a kinship with DR PETRA and her owner - and she is definitely a good-looking boat all around. I hope we see her during the 2020 Salish-100! s/Pete Leenhouts
--
John (@Jkohnen)
Nothing produces such odd results as trying to get even. (Franklin P. Jones)

Re: A Coot Published Author and a Coot Published Photographer

Case Turner
 

Great article Earl! Makes one want to jump in and start building another boat! 

Case

Sent from not here

On Nov 2, 2019, at 5:04 AM, Pete Leenhouts via Groups.Io <pleenhouts@...> wrote:

Thanks for the heads-up, John, for a great article! Having been aboard, even briefly, one somehow feels a kinship with DR PETRA and her owner - and she is definitely a good-looking boat all around. I hope we see her during the 2020 Salish-100! s/Pete Leenhouts 

Re: A Coot Published Author and a Coot Published Photographer

Pete Leenhouts
 

Thanks for the heads-up, John, for a great article! Having been aboard, even briefly, one somehow feels a kinship with DR PETRA and her owner - and she is definitely a good-looking boat all around. I hope we see her during the 2020 Salish-100! s/Pete Leenhouts 

A Coot Published Author and a Coot Published Photographer

 

Earl's article about his Glen-L Bo Jest, Dr. Petra, is in the just-out latest issue of Small Boats Monthly. Good job, Earl:

https://smallboatsmonthly.com/article/bo-jest/

A photo essay on the first Salish 100, containing some photos by yours truly, is in the latest issue of Small Craft Advisor:

http://smallcraftadvisor.com/

--
John (@Jkohnen)
It does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. (Thomas Jefferson)

Kayak Tweaking (was: Coots' Annual Yaquina River Halloween Float, October 26th)

 

I've worked on several of the Dave Gentry skin on frame boats built at the Toledo Boathouse. It's a quick, easy, inexpensive, and very relaxing way to build a boat. You can build a Chuckanut without using any adhesives, or even metal fasteners.

You're never caught with a batch of epoxy going off before you can use it all. The lashing of the frame is kinda relaxing after you get the hang of it, and you can stop at any time. If you come back and see that you made a mistake, just pull out your pocketknife and undo it. I highly recommend the method.

Pygmies are good kayaks, Bob L loves his, but a Chuckanut would be more fun to build.

http://gentrycustomboats.com/

On 11/1/2019 10:45 AM, John P wrote:
Case,
Looked at your suggestion of a Chuckanut.  I think it would be a much better all around craft than the little white water kayak I'm playing with now. ...
--
John (@Jkohnen)
One's life has value so long as one attributes value to the life of others, by means of love, friendship, indignation, and compassion. (Simone de Beauvoir)

Re: Coots' Annual Yaquina River Halloween Float, October 26th

John Purdy
 

Case, Thanks for your reply.  I'm very interested in making a Greenland paddle.  I have some printed instructions I found on the web from Chuck Holst.  Looks like a simple but rewarding project. It's definitely on my to-do list. Looked at your suggestion of a Chuckanut.  I think it would be a much better all around craft than the little white water kayak I'm playing with now.  But I have the kayak right now so I'm playing with it. I'm very much into the aspect of small, easy to transport, easy to store.  Call me a procrastinator, I have a Pygmy Coho kayak kit I purchased 10+ years ago that is still in its shipping box.  Thought it would be fun to have for summer fun but get entirely engrossed in sailing activities and other life experiences during summer so haven't got around to actually putting it together, also hindered by not having a heated place to work on it during the off season.   Dinking around with this white water kayak is making me think more about getting motivated to get the Pygmy kit out and work on it.

John Purdy

Re: Coots' Annual Yaquina River Halloween Float, October 26th

John Purdy
 

David, I agree with the notion of stepping away before one gets too deep into a project that will ultimately be a poor compromise.  Thanks for your comment. Right now I'm just having fun experimenting to see what minor improvements can be made without a big investment in a toy that was obtained for $00.00.  You bring up a good point that getting in and out at a beach would be difficult with the keel 2.0 plan.  Hadn't thought of that.  No don't have much experience with kayaks, Most of my time on the water for the past 40 years has been in production sailcraft, ie Hobie cat, Windsurfer, Santana 20, J24, Laser, West Wight Potter,  I may try a keel 1.5 design where the keel is extended/deepened on just the back half of the kayak.  Making more of a rear skeg than a full keel. 

Never thought of the option of a leeboard, though am familiar with the concept.  Seems like a leeboard would be best used with a rudder and a sail.  Not ready to go down that path. I also have a 16' Klickatat canoe that also was obtained for not much money but could use some restoration. I'd consider making that into a sailing canoe.

John Purdy

Re: Mom and Apple Pie

Richard Green
 

My fave apple for cooking is the Gravenstein, also doesn’t keep well and only briefly available.  I planted a Gravenstein tree in my backyard, got seven apples this season!  Heh.  

A couple of us hereabout have sailed the Laguna Madre on the TX 200.  Great area to go downwind but that short tacking upwind in the waterway might be tricky?

Rich

On Nov 1, 2019, at 9:16 AM, Gerard Mittelstaedt <MITTEL48@...> wrote:

Apple pie - great idea
However, from several generations (on Mom's side of the family) 
and attested by my own taste buds - - 
The absolute best apple variety for pie  is the Johathan apple
- IF you can find them.  Johnathan apples do not store well, and they 
are only available for a comparatively short time. 

From Dad's side of the family, great grandma (German background emigrated 
in the 1880's) was once asked what the German word was for pie, as in 
fruit pie, like apple pie.  She thought about it for a while and said that there 
was no word in the German language which described what we in USA 
knew as pie .. meaning a fruit pie such as apple pie. 

Oh yes, both grandmas were of German background, but on Mom's side 
they came to USA several generations earlier. 

SO - be good to yourself - make home-made pie and enjoy it. 

- Gerard Mittelstaedt 
 sometimes sailing in the Laguna Madre in south Texas. 
where we almost always have wind.  - and the water is skinny, '


On Fri, Nov 1, 2019 at 9:18 AM Richard Green <chaos5@...> wrote:
Well, John, my reading of that article and subsequent complete recipe has made me want to try my hand.  May or may not happen, see how it goes.

Rich

> On Nov 1, 2019, at 1:18 AM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
> 
> I like apple pie, and I think I make a Good one. While reading an article about how apple pie became American I came across this excerpt from a New York Times editorial from the early 20th century: "Pie is the food of the heroic....No pie-eating people can be permanently vanquished.”
> 
> https://slate.com/culture/2019/10/apple-pie-recipe-history-origin-american.html
> 
> The patriotic thing to do is bake an apple pie, and I think I will this weekend! :o)
> 
> -- 
> John (jkohnen@...)
> I will not let anyone walk through my mind with their dirty feet. (Mohandas K. Gandhi)
> 
> 
> 
> 






-- 
Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA 

Re: Mom and Apple Pie

Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

Apple pie - great idea
However, from several generations (on Mom's side of the family)
and attested by my own taste buds - -
The absolute best apple variety for pie  is the Johathan apple
- IF you can find them.  Johnathan apples do not store well, and they
are only available for a comparatively short time.

From Dad's side of the family, great grandma (German background emigrated
in the 1880's) was once asked what the German word was for pie, as in
fruit pie, like apple pie.  She thought about it for a while and said that there
was no word in the German language which described what we in USA
knew as pie .. meaning a fruit pie such as apple pie.

Oh yes, both grandmas were of German background, but on Mom's side
they came to USA several generations earlier.

SO - be good to yourself - make home-made pie and enjoy it.

- Gerard Mittelstaedt
 sometimes sailing in the Laguna Madre in south Texas.
where we almost always have wind.  - and the water is skinny, '


On Fri, Nov 1, 2019 at 9:18 AM Richard Green <chaos5@...> wrote:
Well, John, my reading of that article and subsequent complete recipe has made me want to try my hand.  May or may not happen, see how it goes.

Rich

> On Nov 1, 2019, at 1:18 AM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
>
> I like apple pie, and I think I make a Good one. While reading an article about how apple pie became American I came across this excerpt from a New York Times editorial from the early 20th century: "Pie is the food of the heroic....No pie-eating people can be permanently vanquished.”
>
> https://slate.com/culture/2019/10/apple-pie-recipe-history-origin-american.html
>
> The patriotic thing to do is bake an apple pie, and I think I will this weekend! :o)
>
> --
> John (jkohnen@...)
> I will not let anyone walk through my mind with their dirty feet. (Mohandas K. Gandhi)
>
>
>
>






--
Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA

Re: Mom and Apple Pie

Richard Green
 

Well, John, my reading of that article and subsequent complete recipe has made me want to try my hand. May or may not happen, see how it goes.

Rich

On Nov 1, 2019, at 1:18 AM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

I like apple pie, and I think I make a Good one. While reading an article about how apple pie became American I came across this excerpt from a New York Times editorial from the early 20th century: "Pie is the food of the heroic....No pie-eating people can be permanently vanquished.”

https://slate.com/culture/2019/10/apple-pie-recipe-history-origin-american.html

The patriotic thing to do is bake an apple pie, and I think I will this weekend! :o)

--
John (@Jkohnen)
I will not let anyone walk through my mind with their dirty feet. (Mohandas K. Gandhi)



Mom and Apple Pie

 

I like apple pie, and I think I make a Good one. While reading an article about how apple pie became American I came across this excerpt from a New York Times editorial from the early 20th century: "Pie is the food of the heroic....No pie-eating people can be permanently vanquished.”

https://slate.com/culture/2019/10/apple-pie-recipe-history-origin-american.html

The patriotic thing to do is bake an apple pie, and I think I will this weekend! :o)

--
John (@Jkohnen)
I will not let anyone walk through my mind with their dirty feet. (Mohandas K. Gandhi)

Photos of the Recent Halloween Float

 

Here are some shots from the float Saturday. It was a beautiful day to be out on the water! :o) The pizza was good too.

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmJ4dYop

--
John (@Jkohnen)
The way to fight a woman is with your hat. Grab it and run. (John Barrymore)

Re: Coots' Annual Yaquina River Halloween Float, October 26th

Case Turner
 

I have to agree with Thorne on this. White water Kayaks aren't very good at flat water paddling, even with modifications. Tracking and speed aren't what they are made for. You definitely are going to work harder to achieve speed and direction. Two important things when paddling long distances.

Along the lines of paddles, my favorite to use when kayaking, and even sometimes in my solo-canoe is my cedar greenland style paddle. It's extremely efficient and light weight.

I'd be tempted to find our build a kayak that is specifically for touring or adventuring, (if that's what you want to do). A good cheap easy to build option would be Dave Gentry's 12' Chuckanut.

I have built the 12' & the 15'. Both paddle fine, but the 12' is easier to manuever, especially in tight spaces. Both are light weight and can be easily car topped.

Case


On Wed, Oct 30, 2019 at 9:08 AM David Luckhardt <david.luckhardt@...> wrote:

At some point you may need to step away from the conversion project and look for something more suitable, as it strikes me that you're getting deep into SOW'S EAR --> SILK PURSE territory.  Been there and have the T-shirt collection!   ;-)

 

Getting in and out of the yak with Keel #2 might be next to impossible unless at the dock, and I can see how launching in shallow water could also be a challenge.   Do you have experience with other kayaks?  Some of the tracking issues might be paddling style more than hull design, just sayin'...   Have you tried a longer double paddle, or one that can be offset 90 degrees?

 

If you must modify the boat I'd be tempted to go for the tried and true option of a leeboard.  Easy to rig and remove, and can be pulled up to allow entry & exit in shallows.  Lots of ways to attach leeboards, check out the Interwebs images for sailing rigs for yaks and canoes.

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/16/c3/78/16c37817a57f55f06c6bbbd62f55c559.jpg


--
Dirt