Date   
Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

David Graybeal
 

Love the WeeRob. But since this is a rig that will live on top of my truck all summer... I don't want to make it anything too gobsmackingly gorgeous.

Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

David Graybeal
 

Scott - Thanks for that perspective. Now you've gone and given me pause... just as I was leaning toward settling on the Chuckanut 15. Will you be at the Festiveal 'Coots Breakfast' on Saturday in PT? I'd like to hear more. 

Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

George C
 

David,

Never been on a SUP, so can't say much about it. But I have always had an affection for a open double kayak. When I was 15, I built one from ClarkCraft plans. I believe it was their 15'er. The skin was cotton canvas and I seal it with house paint. The Chuckanut 15 reminds me of it.

Another thought... did you see the Wee Rob canoe at Toledo? It was next to my booth. At 12', I think it would make a nice knock around boat. A little more involved in building though.

George

On Tuesday, August 27, 2019, 09:28:12 AM PDT, David Graybeal via Groups.Io <harbordavid@...> wrote:


I am looking for opinions. Any and all. Informed or theoretical (it helps if you specify which you're offering).

Why? Because I'm starting to fantasize about a boatlike object I can keep on top of my truck all summer, with a paddle in the wayback, and have handy for impromptu (like I have a free hour after work, or couple of hours in the middle of the day while something dries) time on the water. The Harbor Woodworks shop is not far from the Columbia River 42nd Av. ramp. Even closer is the slough that runs thru North & NE Portland. My oldest son and two grandkids live not far from the Willamette River Selwood Park river access. I visit them often, and the 2 year old is turning into a Waterboy... so would like to start taking him out.

The two primary contenders are a SUP and an Open Cockpit Kayak. 

As far as a SUP goes... probably a Storer "T'aal" -- https://www.storerboatplans.com/boatplans/taal-touring-sup-a-new-design-for-a-stand-up-paddle-board/

For an open kayak, probably the Dave Gentry "Chuckanut 15" -- http://gentrycustomboats.com/C15page.html

Thoughts??

Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

sfmarckx
 

I would go with the SUP.

We have paddled kayaks (little plastic ones) for years and especially enjoy taking them up Chimacum Creek, a tidal estuary near the South end of Port Townsend bay.

Earlier this year a friend asked if he could store two SUPs at our house and we could use them as much as we wanted. They are distressed rentals that he got cheap and patched up. We took them to "Family Camp" (an invention of my wife's to get the Grandkids out to visit) at Lake Sylvia near Montesano. At first I was really wobbly on it, but got more and more used to it by the minute. The big thing is I could take our dog (who is not a swimmer and is big) along or I could put a kid on the bow of it and paddle around and have a nice conversation and look at stuff. Yes, you can take a kid in a kayak, but you can't move around in the same way and you don't see as much as when you are looking straight down at the water. Also the SUP is a great swimming platform. You can kneel on it, sit on it, sit with your feet in the water, slide off it and go for a swim and climb back on. It can't swamp, which is a major plus! The kids at Family camp took to them very quickly.

Yes, there is more windage when you are standing up, and using a single bladed paddle is not as easy as a double kayak paddle. They do make adjustable SUP paddles that you can slide another blade into to convert them into a double paddle if that is an issue and you can always sit down or kneel if you want less windage.

If you are going to store it on top of your car you might look for a distressed rental for $100 or so and patch it up so it isn't a big expense.

I still like our little kayaks, but I find I take the SUP out first and let someone else use the kayak. It is also easier to hose down a SUP instead of trying to get the sand out of a kayak after the kids have been playing with it. There are sliding seat rowing systems made for SUPs so I don't see why you couldn't put a seat on it and just use a double paddle if you didn't want to stand.

All the best, Scott Marckx

Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

David Graybeal
 

Yaaaaaahhhhh,... NO.

Anything that's got Andrew all over it is liable to ooze some on whoever gets close. Not a fate I'd wish on any forthright, handsome, talented, young Coot. Or even on myself <G>

Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

Phil Peck <phil@...>
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZMW6WvUz2s

I am not sure this will work for David, but this seems to have Andrew written all over it.

-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen
Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 3:20 PM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

You can try out a SUP for free any Thursday or Sunday afternoon at the
Toledo Boathouses. Anybody know what design the Boathouse's SUPs are?

SUPs seem to be designed for lightweight crew. A typical Coot like David
might overload one, spoiling it's performance. SUPs just seem Wrong to
me. You stand up there in the wind, constantly exercising your "core"
muscled just to stay upright...

An excellent writeup about Mik's design on his Website. If you're gonna
build a SUP, build his. But ask him first if he thinks it's work with a
Coot of your substance aboard. <g>

I'd go with a Chuckanut, or other "double paddle canoe", as Francis
Herreshoff would call them, instead. But don't listen to me, I went for
a Geodesic Airolite rowboat for the same use (except for keeping on a
cartop all the time):

http://gaboats.com/

On 8/27/2019 9:28 AM, David G wrote:
I am looking for opinions. Any and all. Informed or theoretical (it helps if you specify which you're offering).

Why? Because I'm starting to fantasize about a boatlike object I can keep on top of my truck all summer, with a paddle in the wayback, and have handy for impromptu (like I have a free hour after work, or couple of hours in the middle of the day while something dries) time on the water. The Harbor Woodworks shop is not far from the Columbia River 42nd Av. ramp. Even closer is the slough that runs thru North & NE Portland. My oldest son and two grandkids live not far from the Willamette River Selwood Park river access. I visit them often, and the 2 year old is turning into a Waterboy... so would like to start taking him out.

The two primary contenders are a SUP and an Open Cockpit Kayak.

As far as a SUP goes... probably a Storer "T'aal" --
https://www.storerboatplans.com/boatplans/taal-touring-sup-a-new-design-for-a-stand-up-paddle-board/

For an open kayak, probably the Dave Gentry "Chuckanut 15" --
http://gentrycustomboats.com/C15page.html
--
John (@Jkohnen)
Nobody ought to wear a Greek fisherman's hat unless they meet two
conditions: 1. He is a Greek; 2. He is a Fisherman (Roy Blount Jr.)






---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

Re: Coots Enjoying the Port of Newport's Hospitality

Robin Berry
 

Well if I can come up with something that passes my approval, for sure I will pass it on to "promote the cause".  And my watercolor work is pretty loose so the res. on the photo with the BIG Miss Berdie will be A-ok.  

I'm just liking learning about the little boats. I got out of paddling a rudderless kayak a few (10) year ago - too confining on the joints, really do miss getting out on the still-water estuaries.  
~Robin

On Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 3:34 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I look forward to seeing what you come up with, Robin. I think this shot
of our little fleet with the Big dragger, Miss Berdie, looming above us
is the best shot of the bunch. If you like how your picture turns out,
maybe you'd be willing to donate it the the Port of Newport as part of
our campaign to encourage them to be friendly to visiting pleasure boats
(especially Coots <g>). Let me know if you need a higher res copy of any
photo you want to use.

BTW, Miss Berdie was unloading hundreds of thousands of pounds of Hake,
and Scott Malvitch was there inspecting them. Scott was one of the
stalwart exhibitors at the early Depoe Bay shows, and kept his banks
dory in Depoe Bay for fishing in the ocean. It was nice to see him again.

On 8/27/2019 11:39 AM, Robin wrote:
> Hey John!  Thanks for posting the photos!  I would love to try an ink &
> wash of the Coots moored at Newport with the commercial boat backdrop. 


--
John (jkohnen@...)
I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and
degrade my soul by making me hate him. (Booker T. Washington)




Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

Andrew Linn
 

Hey, Graybeal, here's one for ya: The TikTak 10-ish. It operates as either a kayak or an SUP. It it light, cheap and easy to build, and stores easily. Plans are free and you can even use it with a folding chair to get both a comfortable kayak AND the experience of an SUP.

Admit it. A BRILLIANT design.
http://toledocommunityboathouse.com/plans/150318_tiktakten/tiktak.pdf

On 8/27/2019 3:20 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
You can try out a SUP for free any Thursday or Sunday afternoon at the Toledo Boathouses. Anybody know what design the Boathouse's SUPs are?

SUPs seem to be designed for lightweight crew. A typical Coot like David might overload one, spoiling it's performance. SUPs just seem Wrong to me. You stand up there in the wind, constantly exercising your "core" muscled just to stay upright...

An excellent writeup about Mik's design on his Website. If you're gonna build a SUP, build his. But ask him first if he thinks it's work with a Coot of your substance aboard. <g>

I'd go with a Chuckanut, or other "double paddle canoe", as Francis Herreshoff would call them, instead. But don't listen to me, I went for a Geodesic Airolite rowboat for the same use (except for keeping on a cartop all the time):

http://gaboats.com/

On 8/27/2019 9:28 AM, David G wrote:
I am looking for opinions. Any and all. Informed or theoretical (it helps if you specify which you're offering).

Why? Because I'm starting to fantasize about a boatlike object I can keep on top of my truck all summer, with a paddle in the wayback, and have handy for impromptu (like I have a free hour after work, or couple of hours in the middle of the day while something dries) time on the water. The Harbor Woodworks shop is not far from the Columbia River 42nd Av. ramp. Even closer is the slough that runs thru North & NE Portland. My oldest son and two grandkids live not far from the Willamette River Selwood Park river access. I visit them often, and the 2 year old is turning into a Waterboy... so would like to start taking him out.

The two primary contenders are a SUP and an Open Cockpit Kayak.

As far as a SUP goes... probably a Storer "T'aal" --
https://www.storerboatplans.com/boatplans/taal-touring-sup-a-new-design-for-a-stand-up-paddle-board/

For an open kayak, probably the Dave Gentry "Chuckanut 15" --
http://gentrycustomboats.com/C15page.html

Re: Coots Enjoying the Port of Newport's Hospitality

 

I look forward to seeing what you come up with, Robin. I think this shot of our little fleet with the Big dragger, Miss Berdie, looming above us is the best shot of the bunch. If you like how your picture turns out, maybe you'd be willing to donate it the the Port of Newport as part of our campaign to encourage them to be friendly to visiting pleasure boats (especially Coots <g>). Let me know if you need a higher res copy of any photo you want to use.

BTW, Miss Berdie was unloading hundreds of thousands of pounds of Hake, and Scott Malvitch was there inspecting them. Scott was one of the stalwart exhibitors at the early Depoe Bay shows, and kept his banks dory in Depoe Bay for fishing in the ocean. It was nice to see him again.

On 8/27/2019 11:39 AM, Robin wrote:
Hey John!  Thanks for posting the photos!  I would love to try an ink & wash of the Coots moored at Newport with the commercial boat backdrop.
--
John (@Jkohnen)
I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him. (Booker T. Washington)

Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

 

You can try out a SUP for free any Thursday or Sunday afternoon at the Toledo Boathouses. Anybody know what design the Boathouse's SUPs are?

SUPs seem to be designed for lightweight crew. A typical Coot like David might overload one, spoiling it's performance. SUPs just seem Wrong to me. You stand up there in the wind, constantly exercising your "core" muscled just to stay upright...

An excellent writeup about Mik's design on his Website. If you're gonna build a SUP, build his. But ask him first if he thinks it's work with a Coot of your substance aboard. <g>

I'd go with a Chuckanut, or other "double paddle canoe", as Francis Herreshoff would call them, instead. But don't listen to me, I went for a Geodesic Airolite rowboat for the same use (except for keeping on a cartop all the time):

http://gaboats.com/

On 8/27/2019 9:28 AM, David G wrote:
I am looking for opinions. Any and all. Informed or theoretical (it helps if you specify which you're offering).
Why? Because I'm starting to fantasize about a boatlike object I can keep on top of my truck all summer, with a paddle in the wayback, and have handy for impromptu (like I have a free hour after work, or couple of hours in the middle of the day while something dries) time on the water. The Harbor Woodworks shop is not far from the Columbia River 42nd Av. ramp. Even closer is the slough that runs thru North & NE Portland. My oldest son and two grandkids live not far from the Willamette River Selwood Park river access. I visit them often, and the 2 year old is turning into a Waterboy... so would like to start taking him out.
The two primary contenders are a SUP and an Open Cockpit Kayak.
As far as a SUP goes... probably a Storer "T'aal" --
https://www.storerboatplans.com/boatplans/taal-touring-sup-a-new-design-for-a-stand-up-paddle-board/
For an open kayak, probably the Dave Gentry "Chuckanut 15" --
http://gentrycustomboats.com/C15page.html
--
John (@Jkohnen)
Nobody ought to wear a Greek fisherman's hat unless they meet two conditions: 1. He is a Greek; 2. He is a Fisherman (Roy Blount Jr.)

Re: Coots Enjoying the Port of Newport's Hospitality

Robin Berry
 

Hey John!  Thanks for posting the photos!  I would love to try an ink & wash of the Coots moored at Newport with the commercial boat backdrop.  ~Robin

On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 1:12 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Here are some photos of us Coots enjoying Newport last Monday. Voyagers
were Jamie the Seadog and Dan Rogers, Dan Mulholland, George Costakis
(Bartender Boats), Earl Boissonou, and me, behind the camera.

--
John (jkohnen@...)
The theory of democratic government is not that the will of the people
is always right, but rather that normal human beings of average
intelligence will, if given a chance, learn the right and best course by
bitter experience. (W. E. B. Du Bois)





Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

David Graybeal
 

Dirt - you have a Chuckanut 15... right? Do you/did you ever carry one/more of the offspring aboard? Dogs? 

Another thing in favor of the C15 is that it will carry more of a load. So it will last longer as the grandkids get bigger?

Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

Case Turner
 

I have found that kayaks are more versatile and can be a better option if you get caught in a squall or inclimate weather. 

Also the hull speed of a kayak is greater so you can cover more ground. Especially in windy conditions. On a SUP your body is a big sail all the time which can make paddling into ahead wind or cross wind tricky.

Case

Sent from not here

On Aug 27, 2019, at 9:28 AM, David Graybeal via Groups.Io <harbordavid@...> wrote:

I am looking for opinions. Any and all. Informed or theoretical (it helps if you specify which you're offering).

Why? Because I'm starting to fantasize about a boatlike object I can keep on top of my truck all summer, with a paddle in the wayback, and have handy for impromptu (like I have a free hour after work, or couple of hours in the middle of the day while something dries) time on the water. The Harbor Woodworks shop is not far from the Columbia River 42nd Av. ramp. Even closer is the slough that runs thru North & NE Portland. My oldest son and two grandkids live not far from the Willamette River Selwood Park river access. I visit them often, and the 2 year old is turning into a Waterboy... so would like to start taking him out.

The two primary contenders are a SUP and an Open Cockpit Kayak. 

As far as a SUP goes... probably a Storer "T'aal" -- https://www.storerboatplans.com/boatplans/taal-touring-sup-a-new-design-for-a-stand-up-paddle-board/

For an open kayak, probably the Dave Gentry "Chuckanut 15" -- http://gentrycustomboats.com/C15page.html

Thoughts??


--
Dirt

Re: New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

Andrew Linn
 

SUP is great exercise and you do work at it.

The Chuckanut 15 is an excellent kayak design with all the benefits of being low in the water so you avoid wind, ability to ride out waves, etc. And a greatly reduced chance of dunking.

SUP requires skill. C15 requires you sit with butt nearly level with your heels.

Sit on the floor for an hour, see if you like it. Rent a SUP, see if you like that. I'd recommend getting instruction because it is different.

On 8/27/2019 9:28 AM, David Graybeal via Groups.Io wrote:

I am looking for opinions. Any and all. Informed or theoretical (it helps if you specify which you're offering).

Why? Because I'm starting to fantasize about a boatlike object I can keep on top of my truck all summer, with a paddle in the wayback, and have handy for impromptu (like I have a free hour after work, or couple of hours in the middle of the day while something dries) time on the water. The Harbor Woodworks shop is not far from the Columbia River 42nd Av. ramp. Even closer is the slough that runs thru North & NE Portland. My oldest son and two grandkids live not far from the Willamette River Selwood Park river access. I visit them often, and the 2 year old is turning into a Waterboy... so would like to start taking him out.

The two primary contenders are a SUP and an Open Cockpit Kayak.

As far as a SUP goes... probably a Storer "T'aal" --
https://www.storerboatplans.com/boatplans/taal-touring-sup-a-new-design-for-a-stand-up-paddle-board/

For an open kayak, probably the Dave Gentry "Chuckanut 15" --
http://gentrycustomboats.com/C15page.html

Thoughts??

New Build Decison: SUP vs. 'Yak

David Graybeal
 

I am looking for opinions. Any and all. Informed or theoretical (it helps if you specify which you're offering).

Why? Because I'm starting to fantasize about a boatlike object I can keep on top of my truck all summer, with a paddle in the wayback, and have handy for impromptu (like I have a free hour after work, or couple of hours in the middle of the day while something dries) time on the water. The Harbor Woodworks shop is not far from the Columbia River 42nd Av. ramp. Even closer is the slough that runs thru North & NE Portland. My oldest son and two grandkids live not far from the Willamette River Selwood Park river access. I visit them often, and the 2 year old is turning into a Waterboy... so would like to start taking him out.

The two primary contenders are a SUP and an Open Cockpit Kayak. 

As far as a SUP goes... probably a Storer "T'aal" -- https://www.storerboatplans.com/boatplans/taal-touring-sup-a-new-design-for-a-stand-up-paddle-board/

For an open kayak, probably the Dave Gentry "Chuckanut 15" -- http://gentrycustomboats.com/C15page.html

Thoughts??

Re: [TSCA-Puget] Hi

John Weiss
 

Greg,

You are certainly welcome at any of the Puget Sound Chapter events. Note that the Oregon Coots and Lower Columbia River Chapters will also have more events closer to you. I've Cc'ed John Kohnen (Coots) and Allen Bennett (Columbia River) so they can contact you as well.

Have fun on the water!

On 8/26/2019 14:06, Gmail @Aventura [TSCA-Puget] wrote:
Hi Claire,
I just picked up a WhitehallRow Spirit Expedition 17 and am looking for places to sail it locally (Salem, or) and beyond.
Thanks for the reach- out.
Greg Smith
503-910-3578

Coots Enjoying the Port of Newport's Hospitality

 

Here are some photos of us Coots enjoying Newport last Monday. Voyagers were Jamie the Seadog and Dan Rogers, Dan Mulholland, George Costakis (Bartender Boats), Earl Boissonou, and me, behind the camera.

--
John (@Jkohnen)
The theory of democratic government is not that the will of the people is always right, but rather that normal human beings of average intelligence will, if given a chance, learn the right and best course by bitter experience. (W. E. B. Du Bois)

Re: Six boys. Five little boats. A new place to go. All day to get there.

Dan
 

Hi Elaine.

 

Please try again.  My email system crashed under its own weight, apparently.  I think I’m back in bid’ness, now.  DanAshore@....  Sorry for the runaround.  I’d purloin your add from this page, if I knew how’ta.  Jamie and I are headed out on a shortish overnight adventure, this morning.  Back on the grid, in a day, erso.  I did build a hundred feet of boardwalk, out thru the woods to the hobbit house, over the past couple days, so we can report to the quarterdeck for our liberty cards.  I’ll see if I can attach that writeup here.  Dan

 

A book review.  “Building a Hobbit Hiway.”  By Ben Dover.

Few books have inspired me to question the immutable laws of mathematics and the general evolution of humankind, as has this slim volume.  It comes as a notebook truly ready for the worksite.  The author has dispensed with ornamentation, such as a fancy cover—and pages, for that matter.  I particularly agree with the title of Chapter One:  “True randomness requires planning, and strict attention to detail.”

Chapter Two offers a salient caution:  “Turning one man’s junk, into your own, junk.”

 

 

 

 

Chapter three gets right to the meat of it:  “Accepting direction, and criticism, from others.”

 

 

Yep.   That’s a valuable skill.  And, finally, in the last chapter, Mr. Dover offers his best nugget:  “If you don’t know where you are going, then you’re likely to end up someplace, else.”

 

 

It’s a great read.  I recommend it to anybody who might care to make a Hobbit’s life follow The Chosen Path.

 

 

 

Re: Toledo Boat Show Bideo and Newspaper Article

David Graybeal
 

Nice!

Re: Six boys. Five little boats. A new place to go. All day to get there.

elaineginader
 

Hey almost Canada Dan. I tried sending you my email address but my phone said your card email info is invalid.  Elaine


On Thu, Aug 22, 2019, 6:24 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

Dan from Almostcanada's account of our voyage down to Newport Monday.



-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: MTF
Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2019 09:19:31 -0700
From: Dan Rogers <DanAshore@...>
To: Dan Rogers <DanAshore@...>


A short hop, down the lazy river.

 

 

Six boys.  Five little boats.  A new place to go.  All day to get there.

 

 

There’s this place, that almost-nobody seems to know about.  There’s another place, that almost-everybody seems to know about.  They drive right on by one, to get to the other.  They line up with the trucks, and the motor homes, and roar on out there.  And, that’s a pity.

 

Our little group of adventurers took the slow lane, and I think, did it right.  You know.  By boat.

 

It’s one of those chunks of water that literally leaves you wondering “what’s around the next bend.”  And, to my mind, that’s what life should be all about.

 

It’s the journey.

 

The Yaquina River leads from a place called Elk City, down to the sea.  Actually, it starts someplace in the trees, uphill from Elk City.  And, just for the record, if there ever was one, there ain’t no City there, now.  I went there, to make sure, a while back.  Anyhow.

 

Today’s voyage of discovery was from about the upper, middle, top half of the river, to just-about-the-bottom.  This is one of those places where precision might matter a lot, when you manage to pass a nav beacon on the wrong side, with a falling tide.  Otherwise, you don’t even have to squint much, to imagine yourself as one of the indigenous people, or maybe a homesteader from a century and a quarter ago.  It’s a pretty un-molested place.

 

Today, it was Bartender, Lazy Jack, Dr. Petra, Eagle, and Walkabout, who with their human and canine accomplices, had the river pretty much to themselves.  We started out before the first cups of coffee were cold, and with a thinning mist.

 

 

Dunno how quite how this estuary came to be.  But, for a “river,” it’s real durn salty.  In fact, the tide simply rips up and down.  Twice a day, the water rides right up to the tree roots.  Twice a day, there are mud banks, and shoals, even oyster shoals.

 

A thriving industrial base depends upon this channel.  The Port of Toledo has a new mondo-travel lift and associated repair yard near the “top” of the stream.  And, here and there on the way to the “bottom,” folks continue to find ways to make a living.

 

 

 

These guys are in the process of creating an enormous pile of oyster shells along the river bank.  I do suspect they’re a lot more interested in the growing, and dredging, and shucking and marketing of those bi-valve crustaceans.  But, it is a pretty impressive mound of a shell midden.  Biggest  I’ve seen this side of, say, Biloxi. 

 

But, the turn-around point for our VoD, is a place that has figured out how to amalgamate a real deal fishing port and processing center with a big deal tourist mecca.  Newport, Oregon.  Quite the place.

 

 

John worked his local boy mojo with the Port Director, and got us a ringside seat.

 

.

 

 

He even managed to get a band of rowdy locals to greet us, as we made the final turn into the fishing boat pier.

 

 

Jamie the Seadog did his best to talk it over with ‘em.  But he says, “They bark funny.”  Sure seem to be well fed, dontchathink?

 

We got to meet some of the other locals.

 

 

In fact, we could pretty much blend right in.

 

 

Other than how you get the lens all smeared up, if you try to count fish with a camera around your neck.  Other than that.  We went to a great fish place for lunch.  Nobody even said anything about Jamie joining us at that corner table, out on the deck.  He was pretty much keeping to himself.  Probably thinking over what all those guys on the dock were barking about.

 

It’s a busy place.  Boats coming in, unloading, and heading back out.

 

 

 

Of course, we took the self-guided boatguy tour.

 

 

 

 

And, I’m pretty sure.  Everybody had a great time of it.

 

 

And, I’m pretty sure.  We’d all do it again.  Maybe you’ll come along, when we do.

 

 

You just don’t wanna get cobwebs on your anchor, there, shipmate…

 

-- 
John (jkohnen@...)
Antisocial behavior is a trait of intelligence in a world full of conformists. (Nikola Tesla)