Date   

Thank You from Bob Mitsch's wife.......

Richard(Dick)
 

Dear Boating Friends,

 

Bob’s wife, Janice, has asked me (she doesn’t do computers) to Thank all those who sent her Sympathy cards after Bob’s passing.
She appreciated the thoughtfulness of each of you and also to Andrew for getting her to the place to get the COVID Test; and thankfully turned out Negative.

I know he will be missed by his boating friends; he enjoyed all of you and all the times you got to spend together enjoying each others company and boating Messabouts.. 

She sincerely sends her Thanks all of you.
Best Regards to all!!

 

On behalf of:

Her sister-in-law Janice Mitsch:

Jan(Richard’s wife)


Big Glen-L News

 

John and Gayle are retiring, and have sold Glen-L to Duckworks in Port Townsend. Josh and his crew will be taking control of Glen-L next Monday. John and Gayle will still be available for help, for a while, and the Glen-L builders' forum will keep going.

http://www.glen-l.com

https://duckworks.com/

Good luck, Josh! :o)

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Patience! Patience! Patience is the invention of dullards and sluggards. In a well-regulated world there should be no need of such a thing as patience. (Grace King)


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Worldwide Classic Boat Show

 

I'm quite enjoying the Worldwide Classic Boat Show. The presentation by Tom Cunliffe on Saturday (replay viewable anytime) alone was worth the cost of a ticket! :o)

https://classicboatshow.com/

I hope they do it again next year.

https://classicboatshow.com/day-2-saturday-february-20th/

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Life’s meaning has always eluded me and I guess it always will. But I love it just the same. (E. B. White)


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Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Pete Leenhouts
 

A wonderful list, John, thank you. The information on windmills was also quite a bit more than expected - I had never known any of it. I've perused thousands of pictures of sailing ships, and never once have I seen one pictured with a windmill on deck! 

WR/Pete
RIPTIDE


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Feb 20, 2021 8:38 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

If you know where to look, there are lots of interesting old (mostly
pre-1925 or so) books and magazines available online, though sometimes
the scans leave something to be desired. Here are a few places to look:

Hathi Trust has some issues of the magazines we look at during the
Multnomah Library trips, and lots of books:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/

https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008616733

https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000599702

Plus, Forest & Stream; The Motor Boat; Power Boating; Yachting; Hunts
Yachting Magazine; Sail and Sweep...

Project Gutenburg is the grandaddy of book digitization efforts:

http://www.gutenberg.org/

Lots of stuff at the Internet Archive:

https://archive.org/

My friend Craig O'Donnell has put some good boaty texts online (yes, he
looks just like this in person <g>):

http://thecheappages.com/

And here's what I've got listed in The Mother Of All Maritime Links:

http://www.boat-links.com/linklists/boatlink-08.html#ebooks

If you find anything else, let us know.

On 2/19/2021 4:49 PM, Pete L wrote:
> John, that was such a great find!
>
> One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A
> Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic
> weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list.
>
> The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show
> off the group!
--
John <jkohnen@...>
Correlation does not imply causation; except, of course, to your cat.
(Craig O'Donnell)

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Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

 

If you know where to look, there are lots of interesting old (mostly pre-1925 or so) books and magazines available online, though sometimes the scans leave something to be desired. Here are a few places to look:

Hathi Trust has some issues of the magazines we look at during the Multnomah Library trips, and lots of books:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/

https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008616733

https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000599702

Plus, Forest & Stream; The Motor Boat; Power Boating; Yachting; Hunts Yachting Magazine; Sail and Sweep...

Project Gutenburg is the grandaddy of book digitization efforts:

http://www.gutenberg.org/

Lots of stuff at the Internet Archive:

https://archive.org/

My friend Craig O'Donnell has put some good boaty texts online (yes, he looks just like this in person <g>):

http://thecheappages.com/

And here's what I've got listed in The Mother Of All Maritime Links:

http://www.boat-links.com/linklists/boatlink-08.html#ebooks

If you find anything else, let us know.

On 2/19/2021 4:49 PM, Pete L wrote:
John, that was such a great find!
One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list.
The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show off the group!
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Correlation does not imply causation; except, of course, to your cat. (Craig O'Donnell)
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La Semaine du Golfe Morbihan

 

While looking through the Events section of the Worldwide Classic Boat Show I stumbled upon this video about the great festival held every other year in Brittany. What makes La Semaine du Golfe Morbihan special, other than it's size and the variety of watercraft that show up, is that it moves around to several ports on the gulf, so there's plenty of boating involved:

https://youtu.be/qNZ9DAs1S9U

https://www.semainedugolfe.com/

Lots of other interesting stuff at Worldwide Classic Boat Show. I hope They try it again next year, even if we emerge from the pandemic by then. It's a great idea. Could use some improvements, but this is Their first try...

https://classicboatshow.com/

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A society that gets rid of all its troublemakers goes downhill. (Robert A. Heinlein)


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Re: Windmills used to pump bilges

 

A perusal of the Marhst-L archive came up with this:

Bill Bunting:

"Although the North Atlantic is one of the most hazardous of oceans the American-built ships that ended up in the Canadian/UK timber trade in the late 1800s were usually well into their dotage and under another flag, very often Norwegian and thus fitted with a windmill pump, per Norwegian law. I suspect that many had previously been under a German flag -- when American square-riggers had lost the blush of youth they were commonly sold at Hamburg into the trans-Atlantic barreled oil trade, which was a year-round trade. German captains were very proud of their "petroleum klippers“ and particularly liked the commodious cabins."

I wonder what the Norwegian law was about. Surely it wouldn't have required wind-powered pumps on all sailing ships, no matter their afe and condition. But one would probably have to be able to read Norwegian to find out. <g>

Jim Shuttleworth:

"The windmill is probably an Onker. A SCANDINAVIAN device to pump the
bilge. I have a painting of Dashing Wave with one, 1902, inbound off San Francisco by C. Volquards. I have seen photos of other vessels with them. There were many Scandinavian sailors on US West Coast."

A separate search of the Interweb found an article claiming that Dashing Wave's windmill was her skipper's (named Morehouse -- not very Scandihoovian) invention, but I'll bet he cribbed the idea from the Norwegians. <g>

http://cablecarguy.blogspot.com/2011/01/windmill-at-sea-january-27-2011.html

Another image of an ancient ship with a windmill pump:

https://www.windmillworld.com/world/newzealand/ships.htm

On 2/19/2021 6:36 AM, Pete L wrote:
now, here is an interesting sentence from the book "A Floating Home"...
"A barque, such as is often bought by a Norwegian trader in timber, and spends her remaining days being pumped out by a windmill on deck..."
Any local knowledge on using small windmills to pump bilge water?
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I get up every morning determined both to change the world and to have one hell of a good time. Sometimes this makes planning the day difficult. (E. B. White)
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Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Pete Leenhouts
 

oops - sorry for the wrong steer. Pete


-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Feb 20, 2021 1:48 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Ah, I see, the title is actually "a floating home". by Ionides.
-Jove

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 1:46 PM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
I can't find "a life afloat" on the shipbuilding list. what am I missing?
-Jove

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
John, that was such a great find!  

One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list. 

The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show off the group! 

WR/Pete
RIPTIDE
  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


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Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Ah, I see, the title is actually "a floating home". by Ionides.
-Jove


On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 1:46 PM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
I can't find "a life afloat" on the shipbuilding list. what am I missing?
-Jove

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
John, that was such a great find!  

One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list. 

The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show off the group! 

WR/Pete
RIPTIDE
  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


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This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.







Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

I can't find "a life afloat" on the shipbuilding list. what am I missing?
-Jove

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
John, that was such a great find!  

One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list. 

The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show off the group! 

WR/Pete
RIPTIDE
  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.







Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

Pete Leenhouts
 

John, that was such a great find!  

One of the first books on the shipbuilding list was Cyril Ionides' "A Life Afloat", published in 1918. If anyone is looking for  a fantastic weekend read, that book would be at the top of my list. 

The Coots page on the Boatshow is great too - what a nice place to show off the group! 

WR/Pete
RIPTIDE
  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.







Windmills used to pump bilges

Pete Leenhouts
 

now, here is an interesting sentence from the book "A Floating Home"...

"A barque, such as is often bought by a Norwegian trader in timber, and spends her remaining days being pumped out by a windmill on deck..."

Any local knowledge on using small windmills to pump bilge water? 

Wr/Pete
RIPTIDE  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.







Worldwide Classic Boat Show

 

After some difficulties, I've put some photos into the pages They gave us in the virtual show. Alas, They only allowed 12 photos, but we got two pages -- one for the Coots, and another for the Oregon Coots TSCA Chapter. The tickets are only $5, so give the show a try.

https://classicboatshow.com/listing/oregon-coots/

https://classicboatshow.com/listing/traditional-small-craft-association-oregon-coots-chapter/


We just poured margaritas to celebrate John, and we hope you'll join us.

The gates open to the new Worldwide Classic Boat Show Friday morning at 10:00 a.m. (Maine time), and we just "finished" the show's website.  It's even better than we had envisioned.

 
Get Your Ticket Here ($5 for entire show)

GIFT TICKETS (also $5)


THE WORLDWIDE CLASSIC BOAT SHOW
created by Off Center Harbor


Dates:  February 19th to 28th
Location:  Online at ClassicBoatShow.com
Tickets:  $5 (seriously)

 












 


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-- 
John <jkohnen@...>
If you are not a thinking man, to what purpose are you a man at all? (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)


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Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

 

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/library/types_of_canoes_on_puget_sound_1920.pdf

Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
https://preview.tinyurl.com/3yycc5ql
or
http://www.survivorlibrary.com/index.php/8-category/123-library-shipbuilding
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion. (Francis Bacon)
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This guy was definitely a coot!

Case Turner
 

Pretty neat solution for dry docking.


Case

Sent from not here

--
Dirt


Re: Snowbound Boatbuilding

Ken Preston
 

The braided rug is primarily for getting at low bits of work. . .I don't bend over as well as I used to and my bifocals only work a certain way, so my best shot is to lie down full length on the rug and scrunch around until I can reach AND SEE what I need to do. . .besides the rug, a 1' cube made out of six pieces of plywood is never far away. . .something to use to lean on to get stood back up again.  A step stool does well too, but the cube is good no matter which way it lands.  <grin!>
Ken


Re: lots of reading material on shipbuilding

 

Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.

https://preview.tinyurl.com/3yycc5ql

or

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/index.php/8-category/123-library-shipbuilding

"Ship Building Made Easy" Hmmm. <g> Alas, a lot of the illustrations are missing in the scans. Makes some of the books worthless. :o(

On 2/16/2021 11:45 AM, Myles J S wrote:
I friend of mine sent me this link to a list of interest to boat lovers and builders. They seem to be on a slow server, only bring up one page at a time, and have lots of blank pages before you get to the good stuff, but the price is right. Hit the highlighted PDF at the end of each title and then click on the first box below the link which will be labelled Open Link
Library-Shipbuilding (survivorlibrary.com)
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Men with the muckrake are often indispensable to the well-being of society. (Theodore Roosevelt)
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lots of reading material on shipbuilding

MylesJ Swift
 

I friend of mine sent me this link to a list of interest to boat lovers and builders. They seem to be on a slow server, only bring up one page at a time, and have lots of blank pages before you get to the good stuff, but the price is right. Hit the highlighted PDF at the end of each title and then click on the first box below the link which will be labelled Open Link

Library-Shipbuilding (survivorlibrary.com)


Re: Snowbound Boatbuilding

Dan
 

Wow! that braided rug is a real nice touch...I think there might be one
of those on my shop floor too. Someplace under the 'pox drips, paint
pools, and resident sawdust. (Much like PL's) this place looks like a
doctor's office! Nice. dan.


Re: Snowbound Boatbuilding

Ken Preston
 

Not only is it indoors, there's a propane heater too!  I can even epoxy in this weather.  Now if I'd only built the shop before I was 60. . .but one does what one can with whatever one has while one can. . .
Today I'm going to take the midships bulkhead back out and dress up one edge of it a bit. . .darn, should have seen that before now. . .
Ken
(still plenty of snow, but I think I can get the truck up the driveway this afternoon)

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