Topics

Two Questions, Please


Carole Hollmann
 

All --

I have to embark on one of my most dreaded occasions: taking my 15000 in for its overdue service.  It took 30 minutes to find the ginormous Tuto case and another hour to get everything into the case.  That doesn't count getting the behemoth down the stairs and into the car!  Anyway, my question is, what are the most important things I should suggest that they check?  I know they have a list of things they do routinely, but what else might I mention?  I definitely want a new bobbin case and I want the white "disk" underneath it replaced. I can also hear the slightest "touch" sound when the needle goes down slowly and I don't think the needle ever really goes all the way up when I press the needle up/down button.

The second thing is that we are doing Covid-cleaning since we aren't going out, and I wanted to know if it's imperative that I keep the boxes the machine and embroidery unit came in.  They are taking up valuable real estate.

Thanks to all!

Carole Hollmann


Jim Stutsman
 

If you need a new bobbin case, as well as the white plastic piece that sits under it, there is a good chance that the hook race is damaged. If so, it will cause problems with the new bobbin case. Ask them to check the hook race for needle strikes (Magnifying glass recommended), and to buff them out with the tool that has the part #OILSTONE. Hopefully this will not get you a blank look! There is a chance they don't stock the plastic disc or the tool and will have to order them. That could take a good long while. Note that when you take the machine in for service you do not (and should not) take all the feet & accessories in with it. The more stuff of yours they have, the more likely it is that something will be lost. I used to send EVERYTHING back home except the machine. Foot control was left only if they were having trouble with it.

The only real reason to keep the boxes is to allow for the possibility of the machine having to go to NJ for service. 


Vikki Youngmeyer
 

If you ever have to ship one of those pieces back to the manufacturer to be repaired, you will need the box. If you don’t save it, you will be paying a box company to make a custom one for you which would work in a pinch, but not offer as good a support for travelling as the original Janome box. Plus the cost is ridiculous!

The original boxes themselves are quite sturdy. Is there any way you could put them in a corner of a room and throw a quilt over it and use it as a “makeshift” table? If you need more support on the top, you could probably find something at a lumber  yard to work for a top, such as a thin sheet of plywood or Masonite and place the quilt on top of that. Pieces that size are usually in the “throw-away” bins at Home Depot or Lowes. I got a piece of pegboard for another project out of one of those bins for a couple of dollars.

 

I did have to ship my 15000 to New York for repair when the cutter failed. I had to pay shipping both ways. The store where I bought it helped me with packing it into the box. 

 

I would talk to your dealer and get her advice on what she needs. Where I work, if the machine under 5 years old we don’t  want the power cords, extra feet, plates, carriers, etc. as we most of those supplies are standard for a number of Janome machines which she has in her workshop. If you leave any pieces other than the machine, write down on the service order what pieces were left with the machine, so you get them back.

 

Hope this helps.

 

From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> On Behalf Of Carole Hollmann via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 24, 2020 1:39 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] Two Questions, Please

 

All --

 

I have to embark on one of my most dreaded occasions: taking my 15000 in for its overdue service.  It took 30 minutes to find the ginormous Tuto case and another hour to get everything into the case.  That doesn't count getting the behemoth down the stairs and into the car!  Anyway, my question is, what are the most important things I should suggest that they check?  I know they have a list of things they do routinely, but what else might I mention?  I definitely want a new bobbin case and I want the white "disk" underneath it replaced. I can also hear the slightest "touch" sound when the needle goes down slowly and I don't think the needle ever really goes all the way up when I press the needle up/down button.

 

The second thing is that we are doing Covid-cleaning since we aren't going out, and I wanted to know if it's imperative that I keep the boxes the machine and embroidery unit came in.  They are taking up valuable real estate.

 

Thanks to all!

 

Carole Hollmann


Carole Hollmann
 

Jim and Vikki --

Thanks so much for the good information.  Of course the responses generated more questions on my part.

I just took a good look under the bobbin case.  The case itself doesn't look damaged, but I thought I'd get one anyway.  The white plastic piece under it was scratched in the first few weeks I had the machine (it's now 5+ years old) and "the guy" said he could just buff it out and it would be as good as new.  I think that started me down my path of love/hate relationship with the machine.  I don't think buffing it out was the thing to do and if any other damage was caused at the time, it was not checked.  There is no doubt that it should be replaced now.  What I can't figure out is what could I have done to scratch it?

If they don't have the parts, can you describe what "good long while" might mean?  Weeks?  Months?  I will tell him about ordering those things when I hand the machine over.  If they don't have those things in stock, perhaps they would order immediately and save a little time.  In the meantime, I'm also taking in my ancient Kenmore for service.  I may need to resort to using it. I do not need another new machine as I have machines of various kinds that line two walls.

They do want me to bring in my embroidery unit, foot pedal, and power cord.  I have those things packed and I put labels with my name on EVERYTHING, as I always do.  I've taken it in maybe four times over the 5+ years I've had it (for various reasons) and they haven't lost anything--yet. 

At least for now, we are keeping the boxes in the basement.  With all the other stuff to be thrown away or donated, what difference could a couple of boxes make?

Thanks again.

Carole Hollmann


On Sunday, May 24, 2020, 4:35:22 PM EDT, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:


If you need a new bobbin case, as well as the white plastic piece that sits under it, there is a good chance that the hook race is damaged. If so, it will cause problems with the new bobbin case. Ask them to check the hook race for needle strikes (Magnifying glass recommended), and to buff them out with the tool that has the part #OILSTONE. Hopefully this will not get you a blank look! There is a chance they don't stock the plastic disc or the tool and will have to order them. That could take a good long while. Note that when you take the machine in for service you do not (and should not) take all the feet & accessories in with it. The more stuff of yours they have, the more likely it is that something will be lost. I used to send EVERYTHING back home except the machine. Foot control was left only if they were having trouble with it.

The only real reason to keep the boxes is to allow for the possibility of the machine having to go to NJ for service. 


Jim Stutsman
 

Damage to the white disc under the bobbin case usually happens in one of these ways:
1. The needle isn't all the way up in the needle clamp, so it hits.
2. The needle clamp is not tight and the needle slides down.
3. The needle breaks and the tip falls under the bobbin case and gets pushed into the spinning hook race.

Due to the unusual situation we are in, shipping is completely unpredictable. Amazon usually delivered next day prior to the lockdown. Now it's a week or more, or in the case of elastic shipped from China, never. I don't know the state of shipping in the Janome warehouse. If they are not shipping that is a huge factor. UPS, usually reliable, is having their own hard time. Recently we got a package of frozen yogurt treats intended for someone else. It was packed in dry ice, but was actually in-transit for 13 days. The dry ice was long gone, and even though we contacted the rightful recipient immediately, all was lost.

Regarding the aforementioned white disc, most dealers never change it. It's one of the easiest parts to change, second only to the needle, and it's cheap. Many technicians regard it as trim or window dressing, even though every stitch must drag across it.


Tony Coley
 

As a tech those boxes can save a lot of money if your machine must go back to NJ. I ordered an MB4 box with foam insert and it was like $60 shipping from NJ because UPS charged be size, not weight.
As to that hook bottom plate, I keep them on the wall and replace them if I see any needle damage. I generally get 7-10 day service from NJ and 1-2 day service from an after market supplier. I charge the customer $4.99 for the part. At my labor rate I sure couldn’t "polish it out" that cheap.


On May 25, 2020, at 3:21 PM, Carole Hollmann via groups.io <macee55@...> wrote:


Jim and Vikki --

Thanks so much for the good information.  Of course the responses generated more questions on my part.

I just took a good look under the bobbin case.  The case itself doesn't look damaged, but I thought I'd get one anyway.  The white plastic piece under it was scratched in the first few weeks I had the machine (it's now 5+ years old) and "the guy" said he could just buff it out and it would be as good as new.  I think that started me down my path of love/hate relationship with the machine.  I don't think buffing it out was the thing to do and if any other damage was caused at the time, it was not checked.  There is no doubt that it should be replaced now.  What I can't figure out is what could I have done to scratch it?

If they don't have the parts, can you describe what "good long while" might mean?  Weeks?  Months?  I will tell him about ordering those things when I hand the machine over.  If they don't have those things in stock, perhaps they would order immediately and save a little time.  In the meantime, I'm also taking in my ancient Kenmore for service.  I may need to resort to using it. I do not need another new machine as I have machines of various kinds that line two walls.

They do want me to bring in my embroidery unit, foot pedal, and power cord.  I have those things packed and I put labels with my name on EVERYTHING, as I always do.  I've taken it in maybe four times over the 5+ years I've had it (for various reasons) and they haven't lost anything--yet. 

At least for now, we are keeping the boxes in the basement.  With all the other stuff to be thrown away or donated, what difference could a couple of boxes make?

Thanks again.

Carole Hollmann


On Sunday, May 24, 2020, 4:35:22 PM EDT, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:


If you need a new bobbin case, as well as the white plastic piece that sits under it, there is a good chance that the hook race is damaged. If so, it will cause problems with the new bobbin case. Ask them to check the hook race for needle strikes (Magnifying glass recommended), and to buff them out with the tool that has the part #OILSTONE. Hopefully this will not get you a blank look! There is a chance they don't stock the plastic disc or the tool and will have to order them. That could take a good long while. Note that when you take the machine in for service you do not (and should not) take all the feet & accessories in with it. The more stuff of yours they have, the more likely it is that something will be lost. I used to send EVERYTHING back home except the machine. Foot control was left only if they were having trouble with it.

The only real reason to keep the boxes is to allow for the possibility of the machine having to go to NJ for service. 


Carole Hollmann
 

Jim —

Thanks again for the info—and the chuckle about the yogurt and the elastic. I feel like we are all living among the Keystone Cops. We had Amazon leave our zillion dollar ink cartridges under the tree in our front yard. Not long after that Informed Delivery told me my mask nose pieces would be delivered by USPS that day (after weeks of waiting).  Amazon then said they were delivered. They were, but not to me. I jumped in the car and chased down the mailman in his truck, pulling in front of him like the cops do. Nice guy that he was, he did a U-turn and tore off down the road to where his electronic gadget said he might have left it. It was and I got my nose pieces, only to have the machine go belly up. I could go on with that saga as more things happened today, but we all have our stories, don’t we?  

Thanks again for the good info and hope your holiday weekend was pleasant. 

Carole Hollmann 


On May 25, 2020, at 4:36 PM, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

Damage to the white disc under the bobbin case usually happens in one of these ways:
1. The needle isn't all the way up in the needle clamp, so it hits.
2. The needle clamp is not tight and the needle slides down.
3. The needle breaks and the tip falls under the bobbin case and gets pushed into the spinning hook race.

Due to the unusual situation we are in, shipping is completely unpredictable. Amazon usually delivered next day prior to the lockdown. Now it's a week or more, or in the case of elastic shipped from China, never. I don't know the state of shipping in the Janome warehouse. If they are not shipping that is a huge factor. UPS, usually reliable, is having their own hard time. Recently we got a package of frozen yogurt treats intended for someone else. It was packed in dry ice, but was actually in-transit for 13 days. The dry ice was long gone, and even though we contacted the rightful recipient immediately, all was lost.

Regarding the aforementioned white disc, most dealers never change it. It's one of the easiest parts to change, second only to the needle, and it's cheap. Many technicians regard it as trim or window dressing, even though every stitch must drag across it.


Kaye Lessard
 

I would keep boxes in case you ever had to mail it to New Jersey!
Just my opinion as I have sent mine after my dealer retired!!!
Kaye in la


Anne Stoye
 

However, you should be aware that cardboard boxes are considered a fire
hazard. And the polystyrene padding gives off noxious fumes if burnt. I
don't keep mine once I know that everything is working properly. But I
would be able to find a dealer within reasonable driving distance. You have
to weigh up the pros and cons and make your own decision.

Anne