to thread or to vinyl?


Joyce Daniel
 

Hi!

I would like to do a “Bride” long sleeve tshirt for a late Nov wedding.

I could embroider on the front of this shirt or could have the vinyl wording attached.

Suggestions of pros/cons of either? Just not sure which way to go.

TIA! Joyce

 


Pixey
 

Hi Joyce,

I find embroidering actual words on t-shirts and sweatshirts can be tricky to stabilize, because the knit fabric itself shifts so much between letters, especially after washing. I don’t know if you were thinking to use one of the fonts built into the machine or digitizing it yourself.  But for an embroidery approach, I would tend to go with an appliqué style letter, than just stitching out BRIDE in a serif, san serif, or script font.  Or you could use an fusible iron-on letter approach to bring in the bride’s colors and just stitch around it.

Pixey


On Jul 25, 2021, at 11:45 AM, Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...> wrote:



Hi!

I would like to do a “Bride” long sleeve tshirt for a late Nov wedding.

I could embroider on the front of this shirt or could have the vinyl wording attached.

Suggestions of pros/cons of either? Just not sure which way to go.

TIA! Joyce

 


Cheryl Paul
 

I'm attaching 2 pictures that I did 2 years ago.  One was my grand daughter complaining that EVERYONE always forgot her birthday because it was "the first day of school" and so much else was happening.  It also turned out that my daughter turned 40 - 2 days before her daughter, so they both got t-shirts from me.  I have the Artistic Edge Cutter and hadn't really done a "vinyl" project for real, so this was a test of my very limited abilities.  It was a trial that "lucky for me" turned out great.  I did learn pretty quickly that you cannot put the iron on the vinyl - I had a "whoops" that luckily I could fix without much damage.

Embroidery might have been easier as I used more than one colour so had to go to the press more than once to get everything on.  That was the biggest challenge - to line things up.  Sarah's t-shirt has served her a couple of times and both her younger sisters too.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Cat - N
 

Those shirts are great, Cheryl!  

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. _._,_._,_


Joyce Daniel
 

Thanks Cheryl for the great pictures and great info on the shirts you did, which are super cute and very nicely done.

I’ve kinda decided to do a pocket with “Bride”, sewn onto the tshirt, vs a large “Bride” across the chest. She’s a no-frills gal and I’m not sure where exactly to place the “Bride” so it doesn’t end up mid bust, looking unique. Plus, my cricut contact is no longer doing cricut so I would have to find someone who could/would do this for me.

Joyce in hot GA……100 degrees today and I was outside trimming bushes..….whew!!!!


Claire Schutz
 

May I suggest you check Clare Rowley of Creative Feet, she recently did a YouTube on sewing with knits.  She explained how they react and has a stabilizer which will prevent that from happening. She has lots of info on this subject, Claire S.

On 7/26/2021 5:10 PM, Pixey via groups.io wrote:
Hi Joyce,

I find embroidering actual words on t-shirts and sweatshirts can be tricky to stabilize, because the knit fabric itself shifts so much between letters, especially after washing. I don’t know if you were thinking to use one of the fonts built into the machine or digitizing it yourself.  But for an embroidery approach, I would tend to go with an appliqué style letter, than just stitching out BRIDE in a serif, san serif, or script font.  Or you could use an fusible iron-on letter approach to bring in the bride’s colors and just stitch around it.

Pixey


On Jul 25, 2021, at 11:45 AM, Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...> wrote:



Hi!

I would like to do a “Bride” long sleeve tshirt for a late Nov wedding.

I could embroider on the front of this shirt or could have the vinyl wording attached.

Suggestions of pros/cons of either? Just not sure which way to go.

TIA! Joyce

 


Cat - N
 

I hooped sticky tear away stabilizer, then removed only the paper under the embroidery field (score gently with a pin point and peel) and stuck that thin-ish Carter knit onsie fabric to the sticky stabilizer, put water Solvy on top, and did a basting stitch around the design area before I embroidered grandbaby onesies.  After the embroidery was done, I removed the Solvy with a damp paper towel, tore off the stabilizer from the back, then ironed on some self-adhesive French tricot onto the inside of the onsies, covering the back stitching of the designs to protect the sensitive baby skin.

I’m sure you will figure out if you want vinyl, or embroidery or other embellishment, but I do see those kind of t-shirts being sold everywhere and I think it’s a great idea. They’ll love them. Good luck.  

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 

On Jul 25, 2021, at 11:45 AM, Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...> wrote:



Hi!

I would like to do a “Bride” long sleeve tshirt for a late Nov wedding.

I could embroider on the front of this shirt or could have the vinyl wording attached.

Suggestions of pros/cons of either? Just not sure which way to go.

TIA! Joyce


June E Hudspeth
 

Great job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  They’re beautiful!

 

From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> On Behalf Of Cheryl Paul
Sent: Tuesday, July 27, 2021 9:09 AM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] to thread or to vinyl?

 

I'm attaching 2 pictures that I did 2 years ago.  One was my grand daughter complaining that EVERYONE always forgot her birthday because it was "the first day of school" and so much else was happening.  It also turned out that my daughter turned 40 - 2 days before her daughter, so they both got t-shirts from me.  I have the Artistic Edge Cutter and hadn't really done a "vinyl" project for real, so this was a test of my very limited abilities.  It was a trial that "lucky for me" turned out great.  I did learn pretty quickly that you cannot put the iron on the vinyl - I had a "whoops" that luckily I could fix without much damage.

Embroidery might have been easier as I used more than one colour so had to go to the press more than once to get everything on.  That was the biggest challenge - to line things up.  Sarah's t-shirt has served her a couple of times and both her younger sisters too.

Cheryl - Saskatoon




Pixey
 

Actually, I have done a number of successful embroidery projects on knits, t-shirts and sweat shirts.  I have some that are 8 years old that have held up much better than the ones that are 2 years old.  The issue I have is the shirt itself pilling and shrinking around the design after being washed and dried a few times. But that may not be as much of an issue for this particular project.  I was talking to someone in textiles and she was saying that the quality of the fabric itself has significantly deteriorated.

Pixey

On Jul 27, 2021, at 11:50 AM, Claire Schutz <cyschutz@...> wrote:



May I suggest you check Clare Rowley of Creative Feet, she recently did a YouTube on sewing with knits.  She explained how they react and has a stabilizer which will prevent that from happening. She has lots of info on this subject, Claire S.

On 7/26/2021 5:10 PM, Pixey via groups.io wrote:
Hi Joyce,

I find embroidering actual words on t-shirts and sweatshirts can be tricky to stabilize, because the knit fabric itself shifts so much between letters, especially after washing. I don’t know if you were thinking to use one of the fonts built into the machine or digitizing it yourself.  But for an embroidery approach, I would tend to go with an appliqué style letter, than just stitching out BRIDE in a serif, san serif, or script font.  Or you could use an fusible iron-on letter approach to bring in the bride’s colors and just stitch around it.

Pixey


On Jul 25, 2021, at 11:45 AM, Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...> wrote:



Hi!

I would like to do a “Bride” long sleeve tshirt for a late Nov wedding.

I could embroider on the front of this shirt or could have the vinyl wording attached.

Suggestions of pros/cons of either? Just not sure which way to go.

TIA! Joyce

 


a67skc70
 

The thing I use for embroidering on knit fabric, is I add water to my water soluble stabilizer scraps. Just enough water to make it loose enough to paint, and then I paint it on the back of the item, do the embroidery and then soak the stabilizer out. I paint till it is stiff like card stock paper. Sometimes that is more than one coat.
Can't remember anymore who taught me that trick.
I only mix up the amount of "paint" I am going to use, as it will mold if left sitting around, even in the refrigerator.
Linda



On Monday, July 26, 2021, 5:11:04 PM CDT, Pixey via groups.io <pixeyam@...> wrote:


Hi Joyce,

I find embroidering actual words on t-shirts and sweatshirts can be tricky to stabilize, because the knit fabric itself shifts so much between letters, especially after washing. I don’t know if you were thinking to use one of the fonts built into the machine or digitizing it yourself.  But for an embroidery approach, I would tend to go with an appliqué style letter, than just stitching out BRIDE in a serif, san serif, or script font.  Or you could use an fusible iron-on letter approach to bring in the bride’s colors and just stitch around it.

Pixey


On Jul 25, 2021, at 11:45 AM, Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...> wrote:



Hi!

I would like to do a “Bride” long sleeve tshirt for a late Nov wedding.

I could embroider on the front of this shirt or could have the vinyl wording attached.

Suggestions of pros/cons of either? Just not sure which way to go.

TIA! Joyce

 


Roberta K
 

Pixey:

Are you washing your shirt before doing the embroidery? I have noticed that if I do not wash the fabric that I will be using, I end up with puckers. I have also discovered through painful experience that no-show mesh stabilizer also shrinks when it is washed. Since then I have always washed the garment or fabric, and I actually also wash my no-show mesh stabilizer.

When I first discovered the issue with no-show mesh, I decided to experiment. I cut out some squares that were 10" x 10" and put them through the laundry as if they were being washed with a knit garment. I machine washed with cold water and tumble dried on low heat. The result was that my squares shrank to 9.5" x 9.5" on both squares!

I think that speaks for itself. If you take no-show mesh off the roll and use it, you are most likely going to end up with a puckered embroidery.

Roberta in FL


Pixey
 

I do wash the shirts and the no show mesh stabilizer before embroidering.  Usually I don’t have any puckers when the project is completed or even after the first few washes.  But the more it gets washed, the more the fabric around the denser detailed embroidery seems to get deformed.  These days I tend to do more appliqué style designs or use a “patch” approach when working with t-shirts.

Pixey


On Jul 29, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Roberta K via groups.io <robkon94@...> wrote:

Pixey:

Are you washing your shirt before doing the embroidery? I have noticed that if I do not wash the fabric that I will be using, I end up with puckers. I have also discovered through painful experience that no-show mesh stabilizer also shrinks when it is washed. Since then I have always washed the garment or fabric, and I actually also wash my no-show mesh stabilizer.

When I first discovered the issue with no-show mesh, I decided to experiment. I cut out some squares that were 10" x 10" and put them through the laundry as if they were being washed with a knit garment. I machine washed with cold water and tumble dried on low heat. The result was that my squares shrank to 9.5" x 9.5" on both squares!

I think that speaks for itself. If you take no-show mesh off the roll and use it, you are most likely going to end up with a puckered embroidery.

Roberta in FL