Ticking sound from Skyline S7 Model


Kathy Strabel
 

Good day, Janome Friends....
I was sewing on my S7 this afternoon and all was going well, then I got some kind of a thread tangle, so I stopped and removed my fabric from under the needle.  Then I heard a ticking sound coming out of the machine. I listened for a short while; it sounded similar to a clock ticking and seemed to be coming from under the bed of the machine, about halfway between the needle and the left side of the tower--where the "brain" is. It did not appear to be stopping on its own, so I shut the machine off, then back on again a couple minutes later. Everything was normal, so I resumed my sewing for the rest of the afternoon. Does anyone know what the ticking sound was? If so, is it anything to be concerned with? This is the first time I have experienced it. I got no error codes or warnings before shutting off the machine, the needle was stationary, as was the balance wheel. There was no other sound--no rubbing, squeaking, or anything else. Just that ticking. The machine was not hot. And before resuming my sewing, I inspected the bobbin area and re-threaded the top thread.  There was no birds nest on the reverse of my fabric. I hope I am giving enough information.  Any info appreciated. Kathy S   Camas WA


Jim Stutsman
 

Diagnosing this is pretty difficult from thousands of miles away, especially considering that it has stopped ticking. My best guess is that the initial tangle caused one of the internal stepper motors to get knocked out of position. This could cause things to be slightly off, leading to the sound. Turning it off & back on caused everything to be recalibrated during self-test, which would correct the issue. Since you don’t have noise any more I think there is nothing to be worried about. Sew and fret no more!


Kathy Strabel
 

Thank you, Jim for the good news re: the ticking noise from my S7. What, exactly, is a stepper motor? And how many are in a machine? And what is the normal function of a stepper motor?  I have heard this term before, just don't know much about it.   I am so grateful that you had good news for me!!
Kathy S   Camas WA


Jim Stutsman
 

A stepper motor is a specialized motor that does not turn in full revolutions. Instead it moves in very precise "steps". When you adjust your stitch width the stepper motor for that function moves just enough to push the needle 0.5mm left or right. There are many steppers inside the machine for functions like stitch length and even embroidery. The computer knows precisely which position each stepper is in. However if an external force of enough strength is applied (Think embroidery hoop hitting something, needle bar getting whacked, or even a bad "bird nest" under the bobbin.) the stepper can get pushed out of position so it's no longer where the computer thinks it is. When the computer tells it to move it may be asking it to move beyond a physical limit, which can lead to noise. In your case, it's small, but in the case of embroidery it may be a terrified loud "machine gun" type sound. When the machine is turned off and back on, the computer knows nothing about the position of any stepper. So instead it sends them to a "home" position where a sensor trips. You see this in embroidery - the hoop returns all the way to the base. What's happening is that the computer is repeatedly telling the stepper to move back one step until the sensor trips and it knows that home is reached. Then it can reset its position and continue to work normally.