This is for Jim re embroidery files


Fiona Williams
 

Hi Jim,

So sorry to bother you. I am not very techy and finally after many years of owning the 15000 I am attempting to learn it. I use your program Accu Edit to save all of my designs because I am not sure what else to do. I am afraid if I have them on a usb I will lose it and all my designs as a result. I did a couple of courses and tried saving some designs to my machine but it tells me it is full and I don’t see how that is even possible.
My other issue is all of my designs stored in Accu Edit are given numbers so I cannot search for particular designs. Is it alright to change the numbers to names or will I screw something up. Trust me I can screw anything up when it comes to technology.

Thank you for any help you may give.

Sincerely,
Fiona


Jim Stutsman
 

First some clarification - AcuEdit is a Janome app, not mine. There are a lot of videos on YouTube on how to use AcuEdit. This link will get you started:
     https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=acuedit+janome

Another app that is great for managing your designs is StitchBuddy. It has some nice management features and can send your designs to AcuEdit. Having your designs only on the iPad is not a problem as long as you have the iPad back up automatically. But if you run out of storage on iCloud, or you don't back up when you charge, you could lose them. The same goes for USB flash drives. They have a lifetime, and will wear out over time. When that happens whatever is on them is lost. I suggest that everyone follow the 3-2-1 backup rule, which I haven't posted in a while. Here it is:

3: Have at least 3 copies of any digital content you don't want to lose.

2: Store it on at least 2 different types of media. (Those old 3 ½ inch floppies aren't much use now!)

1: At least one copy of your data should be in a different location to guard against fire, theft, etc. I use BackBlaze for this.


Fiona Williams
 

Thanks Jim I really appreciate the info.

Fiona


On Jun 21, 2022, at 9:58 AM, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

First some clarification - AcuEdit is a Janome app, not mine. There are a lot of videos on YouTube on how to use AcuEdit. This link will get you started:
     https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=acuedit+janome

Another app that is great for managing your designs is StitchBuddy. It has some nice management features and can send your designs to AcuEdit. Having your designs only on the iPad is not a problem as long as you have the iPad back up automatically. But if you run out of storage on iCloud, or you don't back up when you charge, you could lose them. The same goes for USB flash drives. They have a lifetime, and will wear out over time. When that happens whatever is on them is lost. I suggest that everyone follow the 3-2-1 backup rule, which I haven't posted in a while. Here it is:

3: Have at least 3 copies of any digital content you don't want to lose.

2: Store it on at least 2 different types of media. (Those old 3 ½ inch floppies aren't much use now!)

1: At least one copy of your data should be in a different location to guard against fire, theft, etc. I use BackBlaze for this.


Ceil J
 

Jim,
I did have BackBlaze (at your recommendation) a year or two ago but cancelled when I couldn't figure out how to access the data.  Is this just in the event of a complete computer crash?  I like to know how things work before having confidence in them and I couldn't figure it out even from their directions/literature.
Thanks for all you do.
Ceil


Jim Stutsman
 

While BackBlaze is reliable and reasonably priced, the restore function is not as user-friendly as it should be. When you go through the process of restoring one or more files, it first has to give you a listing of what's in the backup. Intuitively you would expect that everyone's backup is in a nice container on a shelf somewhere. When you want to restore, a little robot runs and gets the data and presents a list for you to pick from. That's how we, as humans, would do it, but that method won't work for a large database of data from many thousands of computers. The tricky bit is that they keep your backup data on a hard drive, much as you keep the original data. They have hard drive failures too, just like us, so they have to make their system so that a drive failure does not lose any data. This is a very complex process, but the core of it is that the individual backups are stored in multiple places all over their facility. So when you select the restore option they first have to go get all the pieces and build a list. That takes a while, and is one of their user-friendly failures. The only indication that this is happening is a little cloud icon that appears with things falling out of it. If you have a lot of data it make take a few minutes until they have it all collected to display.

There are lots of ways to back up externally. Apple, Microsoft, and Google all offer a form of "cloud" storage, as does the original Dropbox. Some backup software will even copy to those external clouds. You can also make your own external backup by just copying what's critical to an external hard drive, and then storing that drive in a safe-deposit box at your bank. I wouldn't use any "no name" cloud service though. Those I already mentioned are big enough to be around no matter what, but a super cheap "Joe's Amazing Backup Service" is subject to disappear when you need the data the most.

There's also another consideration, given the times we are now living in. Having all of your important information in your computer is a problem if there is no electricity. Most of us have taken for granted that when you plug something into the wall, it works, outside of the occasional thunderstorm short term outage. But we are now in a time when the fuel used to make electricity is ever more costly, and possibly scarce. Even the green dream of "renewable" power is not guaranteed, as those of us in Texas found out in the winter of 2020. Most of us have a safe, or a lockbox that contains things like birth certificates and other "legal" stuff. Consider putting critical account numbers, passwords, phone numbers, etc. in that safe place, printed on a piece of paper. In the event of a major emergency it might be helpful. The Internet is designed to route around any portion that is inaccessible for any reason, but there are myriad connections between you and whatever you're trying to get to. Critical failures can cause you to lose access, just as cell phones can quit working if towers are damaged. As the Boy Scouts say, "Be prepared".


Ceil J
 

Thank you so much, Jim!
I will add that due to our two pellet stoves and power losses from time to time during winter storms here, we have a few UPS devices similar to this https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000FN8G0S/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1.  If the power goes out when the stoves are running, it provides enough power to shut them down safely without asphyxiating us.  We now have one hooked up to the router and a computer so that we have internet if that hasn't been wiped out in the storm.  These items come in handy.
I appreciate that you have taken the time to clearly explain what goes on with BackBlaze.  I was hoping the backup would be like that on an external hard drive, where I could easily find what I need.  I do have two external drives for backup but don't trust them 100%.  I have printed out your explanation and will use it as a guide to update my preparation.  It also reminds me to keep working on my "when I die" file so that my daughter can easily take over.  I've taken many steps in this direction but there's more to do.
So thank you again for this valuable information.
Ceil


On Sat, Jun 25, 2022 at 4:36 PM Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
While BackBlaze is reliable and reasonably priced, the restore function is not as user-friendly as it should be. When you go through the process of restoring one or more files, it first has to give you a listing of what's in the backup. Intuitively you would expect that everyone's backup is in a nice container on a shelf somewhere. When you want to restore, a little robot runs and gets the data and presents a list for you to pick from. That's how we, as humans, would do it, but that method won't work for a large database of data from many thousands of computers. The tricky bit is that they keep your backup data on a hard drive, much as you keep the original data. They have hard drive failures too, just like us, so they have to make their system so that a drive failure does not lose any data. This is a very complex process, but the core of it is that the individual backups are stored in multiple places all over their facility. So when you select the restore option they first have to go get all the pieces and build a list. That takes a while, and is one of their user-friendly failures. The only indication that this is happening is a little cloud icon that appears with things falling out of it. If you have a lot of data it make take a few minutes until they have it all collected to display.

There are lots of ways to back up externally. Apple, Microsoft, and Google all offer a form of "cloud" storage, as does the original Dropbox. Some backup software will even copy to those external clouds. You can also make your own external backup by just copying what's critical to an external hard drive, and then storing that drive in a safe-deposit box at your bank. I wouldn't use any "no name" cloud service though. Those I already mentioned are big enough to be around no matter what, but a super cheap "Joe's Amazing Backup Service" is subject to disappear when you need the data the most.

There's also another consideration, given the times we are now living in. Having all of your important information in your computer is a problem if there is no electricity. Most of us have taken for granted that when you plug something into the wall, it works, outside of the occasional thunderstorm short term outage. But we are now in a time when the fuel used to make electricity is ever more costly, and possibly scarce. Even the green dream of "renewable" power is not guaranteed, as those of us in Texas found out in the winter of 2020. Most of us have a safe, or a lockbox that contains things like birth certificates and other "legal" stuff. Consider putting critical account numbers, passwords, phone numbers, etc. in that safe place, printed on a piece of paper. In the event of a major emergency it might be helpful. The Internet is designed to route around any portion that is inaccessible for any reason, but there are myriad connections between you and whatever you're trying to get to. Critical failures can cause you to lose access, just as cell phones can quit working if towers are damaged. As the Boy Scouts say, "Be prepared".


Mattes
 

Always enjoying (and appreciating) Jim's articles on backup strategies: This is all so true! Some additional thoughts about cloud backups: In some countries - like Germany - an internet connection has very different speeds for up- and downloading, and uploading data (e.g. when backing up) is often painfully slow. That's related to the main purpose of internet connections, mostly requesting data from the web, not publishing to it, but this might become a challenge when using cloud storages. And consider restore times, especially if your complete hard drive is broken: BackBlaze is offering a shipped restore drive, but even this might take days to reach you ... time you'll be left without your computer.

I do local backups with multiple generations to a network drive in my home. From time to time I'm using two external USB drive additionally, which are swapped - one of them going to an off-site location. And while I'm not a prepper I'm considering an encrypted USB pen drive to hold PDFs of my most crucial documents - instead of the paper copy mentioned by Jim: Resilient enough in my opinion, and for me easier to manage.

Just my 0.02$, Mattes  


Fiona Williams
 

Hi All,

So I have been using my 15000 with acuedit no problem until today. I reset all of my network settings and everything seemed fine. Still would not import a design. When I check to see if my machine is still listed in the app it is except it shows up greyed out at the very bottom. No matter how many times I try to get it to realist my machine it does not. Can anyone offer any suggestions. Wedding embroidery to do and am so frustrated. I didn’t even have a problem when we moved everything worked without me having to reset anything.
Baffled 😭

Fiona