Topics

Thick Seams

terryj@...
 

Can someone please tell me their secret for sewing thick seams on their Janome machine?  I've been making flannel pillowcases for the kids for many, many years and my Viking Sapphire never had a problem sewing the thick french seams (two layers of pillow body, two layers of cuff and two layers of accent band).  I tried to make two pillowcases today, on my 14000, which resulted in three broken needles and at least one machine jam that worried me.  For the second pillow case, I even used the dual feed foot and it also stopped at the bottom of the thick seam - wouldn't climb over it without my forcing it which means broken needles.  I adjusted the foot pressure, lengthened the stitch and stitched slowly but it didn't help.  I'm beyond frustrated.  I bought this new machine because I had heard so many good things about how well it feeds fabric and now I'm ready to throw it out the window.  I don't want to have to keep setting up my Viking for sewing - I want to use my new machine for everything.  Ugh...

On the plus side - I really like the embroidery unit.  I used it to embroider their names on the cuffs of the pillowcases and it did it beautifully.

Thank you!

Terry from Maine

Jim Stutsman
 

Welcome to the group Terry! This is a very common problem for new Janome owners. There's actually a feature built into the A presser foot that helps. Rather than try to explain it, I have extracted the relevant video from our FootBook app so you can see it:

https://youtu.be/BN_2CseaUyY

Kathy Strabel
 

Terry--I feel your pain. While I do not have the same machine that you do, I find that my Skyline 7 balks at the thicker seams, like your flannel pillowcases, etc. I have found that Janome has represents their machines as being able to handle just about anything, including thick seams, tote bag and purse projects (out of cottons or home dec fabrics), etc. But I find that in reality it is just not so. I held onto my older workhorse from another brand partly for sentimental reasons, but I have had to pull that machine out to do the heavier tasks, even including hems on jeans and the like. Have you tried using the "hump jumper" accessory that probably came with your machine.? Janome calls it something else, and it is designed to help the foot go over the thicker parts,   You can also try just carefully pressing down on the front of the foot  with your index finger as it mounts the hump of the seam. I find that works sometimes. The idea is to keep the foot level as it passes over the hump. If you are using the Accu-Feed walking foot--be sure that the hook that holds the foot in place to the needle bar is FULLY engaged. It often will pop fully--or partially --out, rendering the walking foot useless. I have seen other people report this problem, but have no solution for it, other than a temporary fix of placing a strip of strong tape over the slot that the hook fits into. It is not an ideal fix, but until (or unless) Janome comes up with a retro-fit clamp or clip to ensure the hook stays seated in place, that is the best I can do.  Good luck. Let the Group know if any of these suggestions work for you.  Kathy S   Camas WA

Kathy Strabel
 

Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA

Lyn Quine
 

I have a Janome 6600P semi industrial and it copes with all my heavy stuff.  I wouldn’t put heavy stuff on my 12000 or my 15000, (similar to the 14000), I think they need lighter work on them, because they aren’t just sewing machines, they are combination machines.  Prefer to us the metal bodied 6600P for the really heavy stuff, it takes it all without any hesitation and has an inbuilt walking foot with interchangeable feet.  I take it to my quilting workshops.  Breaking needles and the heavier, thicker seams, I think is risking knocking the timing out, which means a trip to the dealer.  I make sure I use a big needle for thick seams like a 90/14 or 100/16, longer stitch, slow the machine (even with the 6600P), adjust the foot pressure and its fine.  When I discussed this with the dealer he didn’t think very heavy or thick seams a good idea on the ‘fancy’ combination machines was a good idea.  I got my 6600 as an ex demo and it is a great machines.  


On 17 Dec 2019, at 15:21, Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:

Terry--I feel your pain. While I do not have the same machine that you do, I find that my Skyline 7 balks at the thicker seams, like your flannel pillowcases, etc. I have found that Janome has represents their machines as being able to handle just about anything, including thick seams, tote bag and purse projects (out of cottons or home dec fabrics), etc. But I find that in reality it is just not so. I held onto my older workhorse from another brand partly for sentimental reasons, but I have had to pull that machine out to do the heavier tasks, even including hems on jeans and the like. Have you tried using the "hump jumper" accessory that probably came with your machine.? Janome calls it something else, and it is designed to help the foot go over the thicker parts,   You can also try just carefully pressing down on the front of the foot  with your index finger as it mounts the hump of the seam. I find that works sometimes. The idea is to keep the foot level as it passes over the hump. If you are using the Accu-Feed walking foot--be sure that the hook that holds the foot in place to the needle bar is FULLY engaged. It often will pop fully--or partially --out, rendering the walking foot useless. I have seen other people report this problem, but have no solution for it, other than a temporary fix of placing a strip of strong tape over the slot that the hook fits into. It is not an ideal fix, but until (or unless) Janome comes up with a retro-fit clamp or clip to ensure the hook stays seated in place, that is the best I can do.  Good luck. Let the Group know if any of these suggestions work for you.  Kathy S   Camas WA

Donna Clendaniel
 

Good morning to all. 

This is my experience.      I have the 15000 and have made many canvas tote bags with thick seams. I used a denim needle, most of the time I was able to sew over the thick seams and the heavy cotton webbing (handles)  I did go slow.  The times the machine balked at the seams, I ended up taking a small hammer and hammering the seams a bit flatter.  I did remove the bag from my machine and hammered/pounded the thick seam with a few whacks, on a hard service.  No damage was created to the bag or my counter top.  Put the bag back under the needle sewed slowly and all was good.  I didn't realize about the pressure foot adjustment on foot A, that probably would have helped as well.  I will try that on the next bag.  I can not say enough about my 15000. It has gone from sewing canvas tote bags, Multi-layers Christmas stockings and some embroidery of items. All was good, as expected. I paid particular attention to keeping the bobbin area clean with each bobbin change. Canvas frays and is very very linty, the double faced pre-quilted fabric I used inside the stocking is also very linty.  So again I cleaned the bobbin area constantly. 
the 15000 has been a good workhorse machine.  Good luck to all.

On December 17, 2019 at 10:20 AM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:

Terry--I feel your pain. While I do not have the same machine that you do, I find that my Skyline 7 balks at the thicker seams, like your flannel pillowcases, etc. I have found that Janome has represents their machines as being able to handle just about anything, including thick seams, tote bag and purse projects (out of cottons or home dec fabrics), etc. But I find that in reality it is just not so. I held onto my older workhorse from another brand partly for sentimental reasons, but I have had to pull that machine out to do the heavier tasks, even including hems on jeans and the like. Have you tried using the "hump jumper" accessory that probably came with your machine.? Janome calls it something else, and it is designed to help the foot go over the thicker parts,   You can also try just carefully pressing down on the front of the foot  with your index finger as it mounts the hump of the seam. I find that works sometimes. The idea is to keep the foot level as it passes over the hump. If you are using the Accu-Feed walking foot--be sure that the hook that holds the foot in place to the needle bar is FULLY engaged. It often will pop fully--or partially --out, rendering the walking foot useless. I have seen other people report this problem, but have no solution for it, other than a temporary fix of placing a strip of strong tape over the slot that the hook fits into. It is not an ideal fix, but until (or unless) Janome comes up with a retro-fit clamp or clip to ensure the hook stays seated in place, that is the best I can do.  Good luck. Let the Group know if any of these suggestions work for you.  Kathy S   Camas WA

 

Pam Davison
 

What's interesting is Janome touted the new M7 as being able to go through all of these layers of denim but when you actually watch the video the foot stays pretty level but if you try to Stitch through a lot of layers like you normally do where everything is not level it doesn't have that kind of penetration power however I did find that the new M7 has more penetration power than my other machines I have the Janome 15000 and the 6700.  I ended up buying the hd9 for that specific reason so I didn't have to fight with going through thick layers and I didn't want to chance messing up my other machines.

I was disappointed with Janome because they never responded to my comment.  On their Instagram account they posted the new M7 showing it goes through all these layers and when I added a comment saying I was not able to accomplish that and asked were their any special settings needed I never got a response.


From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> on behalf of Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...>
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2019 9:20:03 AM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] Thick Seams
 
Terry--I feel your pain. While I do not have the same machine that you do, I find that my Skyline 7 balks at the thicker seams, like your flannel pillowcases, etc. I have found that Janome has represents their machines as being able to handle just about anything, including thick seams, tote bag and purse projects (out of cottons or home dec fabrics), etc. But I find that in reality it is just not so. I held onto my older workhorse from another brand partly for sentimental reasons, but I have had to pull that machine out to do the heavier tasks, even including hems on jeans and the like. Have you tried using the "hump jumper" accessory that probably came with your machine.? Janome calls it something else, and it is designed to help the foot go over the thicker parts,   You can also try just carefully pressing down on the front of the foot  with your index finger as it mounts the hump of the seam. I find that works sometimes. The idea is to keep the foot level as it passes over the hump. If you are using the Accu-Feed walking foot--be sure that the hook that holds the foot in place to the needle bar is FULLY engaged. It often will pop fully--or partially --out, rendering the walking foot useless. I have seen other people report this problem, but have no solution for it, other than a temporary fix of placing a strip of strong tape over the slot that the hook fits into. It is not an ideal fix, but until (or unless) Janome comes up with a retro-fit clamp or clip to ensure the hook stays seated in place, that is the best I can do.  Good luck. Let the Group know if any of these suggestions work for you.  Kathy S   Camas WA

J Fraker
 

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.


On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA

Pixey
 

So when Diane’s wrist heals (which I was really sorry to hear about), it would be nice to have a video in either FootBook or the My15000 app that shows how to use the “hump jumper”, which I guess is called the “button shank plate” in the instruction manual.  It has always sort of confused me on how to actually use it.

Thanks,
Pixey


On Dec 17, 2019, at 1:22 PM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA

J Fraker
 

Here's a very good YouTube video on how to use it.


On Wed, Dec 18, 2019, 9:58 AM Pixey via Groups.Io <pixeyam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
So when Diane’s wrist heals (which I was really sorry to hear about), it would be nice to have a video in either FootBook or the My15000 app that shows how to use the “hump jumper”, which I guess is called the “button shank plate” in the instruction manual.  It has always sort of confused me on how to actually use it.

Thanks,
Pixey


On Dec 17, 2019, at 1:22 PM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA

Mary Jo Hirsch
 

Diane hope all goes well with your healing process.  Guess no Christmas cookies for Jim!   Holiday wishes.

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 9:44 AM J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:
Here's a very good YouTube video on how to use it.


On Wed, Dec 18, 2019, 9:58 AM Pixey via Groups.Io <pixeyam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
So when Diane’s wrist heals (which I was really sorry to hear about), it would be nice to have a video in either FootBook or the My15000 app that shows how to use the “hump jumper”, which I guess is called the “button shank plate” in the instruction manual.  It has always sort of confused me on how to actually use it.

Thanks,
Pixey


On Dec 17, 2019, at 1:22 PM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA

--
null

Cheryl Paul
 

I have several Janome machines from a 4120, S9, 15000 and my new M7 and I’ve been with Janome for over 35 years - way before they had the built in Acufeed/Acuflex systems. For sewing those pillow cases, I’ve sewn many and did them on various machines and never had the problem you seem to be having. I used my regular “A” foot that usually comes on the machine out of the box. I didn’t break any needles and probably was using a Schmetz 12 or Janome 11 again the ordinary needles for most sewing. What I did when I got to those thicker places in the seam, was to slow down, and keep hold of the fabric on the back and front - I didn’t pull, just guided the fabric through. If on occasion the machine didn’t move, I would lift the foot (this was before I knew “how” to use the little button on the side of the A foot) and gently guide the fabric up under the needle. A pain the backside to be sure, but it worked and I got my seam sewn. I want to say that even my little 4120 and previous to this my Jam Platinum 760 would sew through a pillowcase french seam at the cuff with a flange added to the cuff with no problems. Just keep trying - you’ll get your machine to work for you and then you’ll love it.

Now you are going to ask, “How could you have had a Janome with that little button feature for 35 years and NOT know how to use it. Well, long story short, I lived in Northern Saskatchewan 150 miles from the nearest city and it wasn’t a big place, but my dealer was there. we only went into the city about a dozen times a year and some of those were after business hours to visit our parents, who lived further away. Our trip was 150 miles with NO towns and 100 of those was forest with just the road going through.

Back to the problem. What kind of needles are you using, Your 14000 should handle what you are sewing - after all it is quilting cotton, right, and usually that isn’t a difficult fabric to deal with. If you watch the video link that Jim sent and follow those guide lines your problems should be solved.

Now to the M7 machine. At one dealers, I decided to try the demo machine and put 12 layers of denim under the needle - that was not a good idea as the needle broke, the machine sang a nasty little tune and jammed. I was very embarrassed, because we had been told that it would sew 9 layers without a problem, but I HAD to push the envelope. I did confess to the dealer and her technician what had happened so that the machine could be checked for burrs in the needle plate and the timing. I know that it still worked, but I wasn’t going to be a bad person who did something that might have caused a problem down the road, when this machine left the store at a demo sell off. I would attempt those layers again, but I think I would “hand walk” the needle through the few stitches that needed to be made in an actual seam situation. We are after all using a sewing machine with a fine needle, even if it is a size 20 - it isn’t a drill we’re operating. I love my M7 and think it will do everything and more than I would ever expect to make on a sewing machine. The lighting is phenomenal and I think that’s almost the most important thing for any of us that are in our “better years” and still have some vision.

Cheryl - Saskatoon

Pixey
 

THANKS!  That was VERY helpful and I am actually kicking myself that I never realized what it was for.  I could have used it so often in the past.  With what Janome called it in the manual I thought it was only for use with buttons.  Fortunately, I did not do like the person in the video and throw them away...I just threw them in a drawer.

Pixey


On Dec 18, 2019, at 9:16 AM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

Here's a very good YouTube video on how to use it.


On Wed, Dec 18, 2019, 9:58 AM Pixey via Groups.Io <pixeyam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
So when Diane’s wrist heals (which I was really sorry to hear about), it would be nice to have a video in either FootBook or the My15000 app that shows how to use the “hump jumper”, which I guess is called the “button shank plate” in the instruction manual.  It has always sort of confused me on how to actually use it.

Thanks,
Pixey


On Dec 17, 2019, at 1:22 PM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA

Pam Davison
 

Cheryl i also have the M7 and love it, however, i did not find that it lived up to the claim from janome about layers of denim and janome ignored my question about it.   (i know that because they responded to my others). 

Again the M7 performed better than my other janome's on thicker seams but not what i expected based on their claim. 

I ended up purchasing the HD9 also because it out performed the M7 on thick seams (went through thick seams the M7 couldn't go through).  i needed a machine that could handle all "my" thick seams and the HD9 does that for me.


From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> on behalf of Cheryl Paul <capaul@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 9:51:22 AM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] Thick Seams
 
I have several Janome machines from a 4120, S9, 15000 and my new M7 and I’ve been with Janome for over 35 years - way before they had the built in Acufeed/Acuflex systems.  For sewing those pillow cases, I’ve sewn many and did them on various machines and never had the problem you seem to be having.  I used my regular “A” foot that usually comes on the machine out of the box.  I didn’t break any needles and probably was using a Schmetz 12 or Janome 11 again the ordinary needles for most sewing.  What I did when I got to those thicker places in the seam, was to slow down, and keep hold of the fabric on the back and front - I didn’t pull, just guided the fabric through.  If on occasion the machine didn’t move, I would lift the foot (this was before I knew “how” to use the little button on the side of the A foot) and gently guide the fabric up under the needle.  A pain the backside to be sure, but it worked and I got my seam sewn.  I want to say that even my little 4120 and previous to this my Jam Platinum 760 would sew through a pillowcase french seam at the cuff with a flange added to the cuff with no problems.  Just keep trying - you’ll get your machine to work for you and then you’ll love it.

Now you are going to ask, “How could you have had a Janome with that little button feature for 35 years and NOT know how to use it.  Well, long story short, I lived in Northern Saskatchewan 150 miles from the nearest city and it wasn’t a big place, but my dealer was there.  we only went into the city about a dozen times a year and some of those were after business hours to visit our parents, who lived further away.  Our trip was 150 miles with NO towns and 100 of those was forest with just the road going through. 

Back to the problem.  What kind of needles are you using, Your 14000 should handle what you are sewing - after all it is quilting cotton, right, and usually that isn’t a difficult fabric to deal with.  If you watch the video link that Jim sent and follow those guide lines your problems should be solved.

Now to the M7 machine.  At one dealers, I decided to try the demo machine and put 12 layers of denim under the needle - that was not a good idea as the needle broke, the machine sang a nasty little tune and jammed.  I was very embarrassed, because we had been told that it would sew 9 layers without a problem, but I HAD to push the envelope.  I did confess to the dealer and her technician what had happened so that the machine could be checked for burrs in the needle plate and the timing.  I know that it still worked, but I wasn’t going to be a bad person who did something that might have caused a problem down the road, when this machine left the store at a demo sell off.  I would attempt those layers again, but I think I would “hand walk” the needle through the few stitches that needed to be made in an actual seam situation.  We are after all using a sewing machine with a fine needle, even if it is a size 20 - it isn’t a drill we’re operating.  I love my M7 and think it will do everything and more than I would ever expect to make on a sewing machine.  The lighting is phenomenal and I think that’s almost the most important thing for any of us that are in our “better years” and still have some vision.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Jim Stutsman
 

The primary use is actually not for "hump jumping". It's a button elevator. See the "Button Sewing" application video to see how to use it for it's primary purpose.

Anne Parker
 

I don't know if anyone has mentioned it, but I would also look at slightly reducing the pressure of the presser foot.  If I'm crossing a thick seam I reduce the pressure while crossing and then put it back afterwards.  I also, as someone has said, hammer seams to flatten them before stitching if need be.  This works well on denim/jeans.  As a last resort I return to my hundred year old Singer and other handcranks, which never have a problem, plus a lot more control for just doing one or two stitches very slowly whilst manipulating the fabric through. :0)

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. Desiderata - By Max Ehrmann © 1927

bhd02@...
 

When I read the word "hammer" I thought "uh-oh" until I read further. Hammering seams is also used on leather and helps. I haven't read anything about the HP foot which I've used on heavy seams. My 15000 has been dependable on some really thick stuff. A friend wanted me to shorten a handbag strap. Instead of cutting it she doubled it over to make three thicknesses of strap. It was a challenge and I couldn't do the professional X in the square, but was able to slowly and with a large needle, can't remember but probably a 16, get the job done.
.

Nancy Lusk
 

Thank you for this video!  I didn’t know what that tool was for!  Will put it to good use. 
Merry Christmas. 

Nancy

"But he would feed you with the finest of the wheat, and with honey from the rock I would satisfy you."  Psalm 81:16

On Dec 18, 2019, at 10:44 AM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:


Here's a very good YouTube video on how to use it.


On Wed, Dec 18, 2019, 9:58 AM Pixey via Groups.Io <pixeyam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
So when Diane’s wrist heals (which I was really sorry to hear about), it would be nice to have a video in either FootBook or the My15000 app that shows how to use the “hump jumper”, which I guess is called the “button shank plate” in the instruction manual.  It has always sort of confused me on how to actually use it.

Thanks,
Pixey


On Dec 17, 2019, at 1:22 PM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA

marjackpot@yahoo.com
 

I had a 6500 that would sew through anything, after that went I got a t6300, that had a hard time going more than 2 seams.  I finally got a 8200 and let me tell you this is a work horse, it the best machine I have ever owned.  I do make some bags that are really heavy and it sews them like  hot butter.  If you are looking for a new machine and don't need all the bells and whistles check out the 8200 instead of the 9400.

Carole Hollmann
 

Is the 8200 you mention the same that I am finding on line—that is the MC8200QCP?

Thanks much

Carole