sewing polyester


Carole O'Mara
 

I would like to hem golf shirts--100% polyester, some poly & about 9% spandex.  How do I keep the hems from looking like ruffles? Since these fabrics don't ravel, I do not need to finish the raw edge...just trim, fold fabric to wrong side and stitch.  I'd like 2 rows of stitches about 1/4" apart as that would look best as these shirts are worn untucked.  I have MC15000.  Thank you for any suggestions.  

Carole - Colorado


Carolyn Gazerro
 

Use a wide double needle. It will encase. You don’t need to fold it. If fabric still ravels use see through wash away on top, tear it away and just wash away the remainder of stabilizer.

🌹Carolyn


Kathy Strabel
 

Carole--I do this when I sew the hems on poly/lycra swimwear. I usually make a separate tank-type of top to go over the briefs bottoms for myself.

Cut some 1" strips of washaway sticky stabilizer--enough to cover the circumference of your shirt bottom plus a little overlap. Do not leave any gaps in the stabilizer.    Press up your hem allowance, then stick the stabilizer on the inside of the shirt bottom, being sure to place it so your needle will penetrate the fabric AND the stabilizer. Stitch your hem as desired. I have the best results from using Janome purple tip needles and Coats and Clark Dual duty thread. You can use a double needle if you want single lines of thread spaced evenly, but I do not use that type of needle. Instead, I use one of the stretch stitches that resembles a serger stitch. AFter stitching your hem, your shirt bottom will be non-stretch until you soak or wash the shirt and the stabilizer disappears.   Good luck. You might want to do a couple practice runs before stitching on your golf shirts!! Happy (stretchy!) stitching!!!!   Kathy Strabel   Camas WA

On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 6:45 AM Carole O'Mara <caroleinco@...> wrote:

I would like to hem golf shirts--100% polyester, some poly & about 9% spandex.  How do I keep the hems from looking like ruffles? Since these fabrics don't ravel, I do not need to finish the raw edge...just trim, fold fabric to wrong side and stitch.  I'd like 2 rows of stitches about 1/4" apart as that would look best as these shirts are worn untucked.  I have MC15000.  Thank you for any suggestions.  

Carole - Colorado



--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel





Padden, Jennifer R
 

It helps for you to use a walking foot with a ball point needle.


On Sat, Jun 5, 2021, 8:45 AM Carole O'Mara <caroleinco@...> wrote:

I would like to hem golf shirts--100% polyester, some poly & about 9% spandex.  How do I keep the hems from looking like ruffles? Since these fabrics don't ravel, I do not need to finish the raw edge...just trim, fold fabric to wrong side and stitch.  I'd like 2 rows of stitches about 1/4" apart as that would look best as these shirts are worn untucked.  I have MC15000.  Thank you for any suggestions.  

Carole - Colorado


favymtz
 

Kathy gave really good instructions, and I also feel that stabilizing the fabric to sew it is key. I'll add a few more tips that I find useful.
Sometimes I just starch the shirt hem and press it dry to gain that stabilization for the sewing.
There's bias knit fusible interfacing that comes on a roll that stabilizes the hem, it works great.
If using a  Stretch Twin needle, lessen the upper tension so that the fabric doesn't tunnel as you sew it.
(Or maybe using a blue bobbin case would accomplish the same thing, but I haven't tried it, only in theory it seems like it would work!)
Lightly stretch the hem as you sew it when using a straight stitch because the knit fabric needs to retain that stretchiness,
Otherwise your straight stitches will pop.
Many stitches work well for knits, I sometimes use the # 21 in Utility for knit hems, it's a little bit decorative, #25 is also a good one for knits and looks like the underside of a Cover Hem.
--
Favymtz


Pixey
 

Carole,

You don’t say how many shirts you want to hem. But if it is a large number or ongoing project, investing in a cover lock or serger with cover lock stitch capabilities might be worth exploring.  I have a Janome CoverPro 1000 CPX that I use to shorten hems and sleeves on t-shirts and golf style shirts and it is great at it.

Pixey


On Jun 5, 2021, at 8:45 AM, Carole O'Mara <caroleinco@...> wrote:



I would like to hem golf shirts--100% polyester, some poly & about 9% spandex.  How do I keep the hems from looking like ruffles? Since these fabrics don't ravel, I do not need to finish the raw edge...just trim, fold fabric to wrong side and stitch.  I'd like 2 rows of stitches about 1/4" apart as that would look best as these shirts are worn untucked.  I have MC15000.  Thank you for any suggestions.  

Carole - Colorado


Sally Silvers
 

You have some good suggestions already and I'm going to add one more:  Pin a strip of paper, 1 inch or so, behind where your stitching will go.  Of course, you have to tear it away once you've stitched, but that will prevent stretching.


Cheryl Paul
 

I haven’t tried sewing a hem with a wide double needle on my 15000, because I have a CoverPro 2000. It creates the same problem when I hem my t-shirts. To avoid this I have tried a number of things
1. a stabilizer called - Knit Stay Tape. It’s made my SewkeysE - I have it in Ivory, Black, White and there is a light beige as well. It comes in a few widths. I like 1/2” as I also use this in the shoulders of my t-shirts. It can also be used in the side seams if they tend to ripple or in a very unstable knit as some of the rayon ones. I also have it in 1” and 1 1/4”. I cut the 1” in half if I run out. It is “iron-on” but use a press cloth to attach it as it will do funny things if you don’t.

2. Floriani Wet N Gone Tacky Tape is one I used recently and it is wonderful BUT, you can’t stretch your fabric. Why I really like it is because you can just press it on with your fingers, turn up the hem and stitch away. I was very careful, as I once tried this quite a while ago and found that the machine pushed the fabric on top stretching it a little then I ended up at the end with “extra” fabric - just a pinch, but I wasn’t happy and had to “unseen” it and do it over. It washes out when you put the garment through the laundry - wear it first - no need to not get that FIRST wearing when it is spanking, brand new.

These would work with a sewing machine as well as a Cover Hem machine.

I was able to get the Floriani product from my local Janome (and many other brands) machine dealer and the Knit Stay Tape from my hour away Janome Dealer. These should be available to you from some close by.

Also you can take a tacky washable stabilizer and strip it to use as was suggested. This also works with a a fusible knit interfacing that is very thin - I think it might be referred to as fuse-knit - get a light weight as you don’t want it to show or be bulky. We like our tasks to be easy while we make our garments. We just need to do some prep work and that sometimes seems to be a time waster but believe me it is not.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Cat - N
 

Cheryl, are you saying that you get 'tunneling/puffing' between your needle threads on your CoverPro 2000 when using coverstitch?  Just wondering...

- Cat


-----Original Message-----
From: Cheryl Paul <capaul@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Sun, Jun 6, 2021 4:12 pm
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] sewing polyester

I haven’t tried sewing a hem with a wide double needle on my 15000, because I have a CoverPro 2000.  It creates the same problem when I hem my t-shirts.  To avoid this I have tried a number of things
1.  a stabilizer called - Knit Stay Tape.  It’s made my SewkeysE - I have it in Ivory, Black, White and there is a light beige as well.  It comes in a few widths.  I like 1/2” as I also use this in the shoulders of my t-shirts.  It can also be used in the side seams if they tend to ripple or in a very unstable knit as some of the rayon ones.  I also have it in 1” and 1 1/4”.  I cut the 1” in half if I run out.  It is “iron-on” but use a press cloth to attach it as it will do funny things if you don’t.

2.  Floriani Wet N Gone Tacky Tape is one I used recently and it is wonderful BUT, you can’t stretch your fabric.  Why I really like it is because you can just press it on with your fingers, turn up the hem and stitch away.  I was very careful, as I once tried this quite a while ago and found that the machine pushed the fabric on top stretching it a little then I ended up at the end with “extra” fabric - just a pinch, but I wasn’t happy and had to “unseen” it and do it over.  It washes out when you put the garment through the laundry - wear it first - no need to not get that FIRST wearing when it is spanking, brand new.

These would work with a sewing machine as well as a Cover Hem machine.

I was able to get the Floriani product from my local Janome (and many other brands) machine dealer and the Knit Stay Tape from my hour away Janome Dealer.  These should be available to you from some close by.

Also you can take a tacky washable stabilizer and strip it to use as was suggested.  This also works with a a fusible knit interfacing that is very thin - I think it might be referred to as fuse-knit - get a light weight as you don’t want it to show or be bulky.  We like our tasks to be easy while we make our garments.  We just need to do some prep work and that sometimes seems to be a time waster but believe me it is not.

Cheryl - Saskatoon





Cheryl Paul
 

No, my CoverPro 2000 works very well and doesn’t tunnel, unless I pull a thread that I don’t mean to when I’m taking out the garment from under the needles. I’ve learned to be careful when I do this. I’m still very much in the learning process of the CoverHem machine as it isn’t a machine I use daily or even on a weekly basis - just occasionally - but I love it as it gives that professional look to a garment.

If I had a wish for this machine and my serger it would be that it started out sewing like my sewing machine do - gradually. I hold the foot down and it whirs a lot until I press harder - this always makes me feel like it is going to race away on me. I may not be describing this well, but if someone who does has a tip for me, I’d sure be glad to hear it.

A dear friend passed away last December (not from COVID) and I purchased a couple of her machines and one was her CoverPro 2000 to give to my granddaughter. She’s not sure that she will be allowed to have it as there are 3 more children younger in their very crowded home. A big house becomes smaller as the children grow up and these kids are aged 7-15, so they are getting bigger - Ava is almost as tall as her Mom and definitely a bit taller than me.
She’ll get it eventually and in the meantime she can sew on it in Grandma’s house. She’s better at this machine than I am.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


favymtz
 

Cheryl, it's been my experience with sergers (& a CoverPro works similarly, I don't own one) that when we press on the foot pedal, it takes a few moments for the stitching to actually start.
It has something to do with the fact that it's mechanical, not like our computerized machines, that start sewing almost instantly.
At least in my use of 2 different brands of sergers there's always that 'humming' or grinding' sound that precedes the machine starting to stitch.
My friend I was helping last week, was using the newest Janome Air Threader serger, mine is a lower end Janome and we both had the exact same start up time when we press the foot pedal.
I don't think it's something we can do to change it, and even stepping harder on the control doesn't really make it start quicker.
Just stay steady!
--
Favymtz


Cat - N
 

You've got me curious now...will have to fire up my Pfaff 4874 to see how long it takes to start stitching after pressing the foot pedal...and whether there's 'humming' or 'grinding' as well.  lol

- Cat



Pixey
 

I noticed the same thing with my CoverPro and both sergers. I also noticed similar behavior with my HD9 (which is a much more mechanical machine than my computerized ones).

Pixey


On Jun 9, 2021, at 9:50 AM, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:

Cheryl, it's been my experience with sergers (& a CoverPro works similarly, I don't own one) that when we press on the foot pedal, it takes a few moments for the stitching to actually start.
It has something to do with the fact that it's mechanical, not like our computerized machines, that start sewing almost instantly.
At least in my use of 2 different brands of sergers there's always that 'humming' or grinding' sound that precedes the machine starting to stitch.
My friend I was helping last week, was using the newest Janome Air Threader serger, mine is a lower end Janome and we both had the exact same start up time when we press the foot pedal.
I don't think it's something we can do to change it, and even stepping harder on the control doesn't really make it start quicker.
Just stay steady!
--
Favymtz


Cheryl Paul
 

Thanks Faviola.

Re: Slow start up on my serger and Coverhem
I did know about the slow start on these mechanical machines, but had “sort of” forgotten. Our computerized sewing machines have really done a good job of spoiling us and fast. I will just continue to use lots of patience when I use these 2 mechanical machines - I love them both.

I’ll be using the serger as a 2-thread to trim and finish the edges of my grandson’s quilt so that he can apply the binding. I had him make his own birthday present for June 28th - the BIG day. We had some good bonding time during the sewing process. It seems I get to spend more time with his 2 sisters than with him and his younger brother. I'll put a picture in the files when we are finished - next week I hope.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


xglsc1945@...
 

All of the answers you have been given are great.  Yes to the wash away stabilizer, but you can also use a light tear away ON TOP where the double row of straight stitches form.  The one suggestion I'm not seeing is to lower the pressure foot pressure.  That will help with the wavy hem as well.  If these shirts are the new thin "performance" type fabric you may need to go to a ball point needle.  If they are typical golf shirts a universal 90/14 needle should do just fine.  I would also encourage you to consider a Janome coverstitch machine... enabling always happy to enable!