Topics

Router ports to open and UDP or TCP?

Ceil J
 

I had to replace my router and now my laptop won't communicate with the machine even though both are on the same network (the printer won't work either).  I'm not sure that the router people are on top of this as my desktop can still communicate with the machine, but not with the printer.
They want to know what ports Janome needs to have open and whether those ports are UDP or TCP (means nothing to me and I don't need to know).  I'm thinking that the older desktop is on the 2.4 router part along with the Janome but my desktop is on the 5, and that's the problem but that still doesn't explain why neither can connect to the printer.  But they want the ports information and they will go from there. 
Thanks for any help.  This is way beyond my capabilities.

Jim Stutsman
 

There are two "sides" to your network. The Wide Area Network (WAN) is the Internet, the outside world. That's where you need to be very careful about exposing the router to the legions of miscreants bent on getting in. The other side is the Local Area Network (LAN) inside your house. Devices that are all on the LAN don't need to worry abut ports and protocols, unless the go out to the WAN. The reason Janome does not publish port address or UDP/TCP is because the machine does not go on the WAN at all. It sounds like your guys don't quite understand how it works. You want to firewall the router on the WAN side, but on the LAN side there isn't much chance of one of your devices trying to hack another device. Maybe they're trying to protect you from a WiFi attack from someone sitting outside the house, but that's best done with encryption and noticing that somebody is sitting in front of the house with a phone or computer.

Mattes
 

Router ports to be opened are important for a communication from external (internet) devices into your home network. With both parties - your embroidery machine and PC - being inside of your network, they are totally irrelevant.

The "router people" should more look into the intercommunication between the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz WiFi: There might be a network separation in place.

Greetings, Mattes

Ceil J
 

Yes, thank you to you both.  This is now much clearer.  This request was from a group that handles the overflow for our local techs.  The local tech saw the trouble ticket and called me.  Now my (old) desktop can communicate with both the printer and the Janome so it seems it's the relatively new laptop that has a problem.  So far hours with their tech support has yielded no results and so I've been backing up everything in anticipation of a system wipe and replace.  UGH.  But thank you again.  The router could not  have been the problem if it let one computer interact with the network, so the laptop is the problem.

Ceil J
 

Thank you.  The router guy was certainly way off base and the local tech who contacted me explained that those folks have an average employment time of 9 months.   I will mention to the computer tech about the two options but I'm beginning to be confident that there's something wrong with this laptop as the reason for the new router was due to the laptop repeatedly dropping the main network saying it wasn't secure.   I was using a Netgear router on top of the main router but it had been working fine for months.   They said the newer router would be all I need and would fix the problem. Yes, it did solve one problem and now there is another.

Cat - N
 

Ceil,

You can use WiFi between devices without an internet connection of any kind, so internet packet transmission/control protocols (UDP and TCP..."TCP/IP (Internet Protocol) address", remember?) have to do with data getting where it's going (and it's condition on arrival)...'on someone else's network'...and would be spectacularly unrelated. 

The issues with WiFi connections between routers and devices would be more antenna signal strength/range, radio channel used, if the router can and is distributing DHCP to internal devices...stuff like that. 

Bless your heart, it sounds like you and I have the same modem and were talking to the same 'tech support' today (the many-th time for me...and 5 techs out to the house since April 22).  I have finally rummaged through enough forums and found many complaints about the 'new modem' I was sent having a terrible antenna with extremely limited strength, yet they sent it to replace a completely wonderful, grandly working modem which they took with them, and, now, I can't print, and a whole bunch more...haven't tried the 15000 yet, but doubt I will be able to access it because this 'new' (crapola) WiFi router drops my iPhone 11 Pro Max at about 14' feet in a room where I could chuck the phone AT the router and break them both on impact. I won't even tell you some of the super stupid things I was told by 'front line tech support' today...egads!

- Cat


Cat - N
 

Ceil, hang on...LOL

You said "new laptop"...
You said "wipe"...

I am not easily buffalo'd by tech support, having spent over 30 years in IT building networks, servers, workstations, programming, etc.

If you have one WiFi device (desktop PC) that IS connected to the WiFi router, and another (new laptop PC) that is NOT connected, the ROUTER CAN STILL be the problem.

I have a similar problem here...my PC might be on the WiFi, but hubby's PC and one or both of our iPhones is not, nor is the printer or the fridge or the range, but I know what the issue is here, and have already ordered a more powerful, capable router to replace this hunk of junk.

I am not sure what you'd be 'wiping' but first...

Things to check on the "new laptop" include:
1.  Is there a little switch that turns WiFi ON...?
2.  If so, IS WiFi turned ON...?
3.  Can YOU log into your router as "ADMIN"...?
4.  What do you IN your router when you log in...?

If it is a Windows laptop, and you can get a command prompt window, try typing:
ipconfig /all
EXACTLY as written above, then press ENTER.
There will be a bunch of gobbledy-gook, but scroll up through it and look for something like:
Wireless LAN adapter Wi-Fi
and make sure there are TCP/IP addresses associated with it.

- Cat



Cat - N
 

Okay...when you say you are using "a Netgear router on top of the main router"...

Is one router working as an "access point" or as a "bridge"?

Running a network with two or more routers, especially as they come 'out of the box' from the store, really can require some TLC (technical loving care) :-)

- Cat



-----Original Message-----
From: Ceil J <cjancola@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Jul 6, 2020 5:26 pm
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] Router ports to open and UDP or TCP?

Thank you.  The router guy was certainly way off base and the local tech who contacted me explained that those folks have an average employment time of 9 months.   I will mention to the computer tech about the two options but I'm beginning to be confident that there's something wrong with this laptop as the reason for the new router was due to the laptop repeatedly dropping the main network saying it wasn't secure.   I was using a Netgear router on top of the main router but it had been working fine for months.   They said the newer router would be all I need and would fix the problem. Yes, it did solve one problem and now there is another.

Ceil J
 

Cat, ""access point" or as a "bridge"?"  I haven't a clue.  (Also this is different from what I just sent to you so I'm not sure what I've done here either.  Replying to your last post game me a much bigger font. 
Anyway, we moved about 3 years ago and had used this same type of set up in our previous home.  The main router plugged in and this one used to extend the network (my way of thinking),  I'm fairly sure we used that Netgear router before on it's own, maybe when we had dial up?  I don't remember. 
So at this house we had the teenage grandkids and their parents here once a week and they all had phones and ipads and sometimes the connections didn't seem to work too well so we plugged in the Netgear via Cat cable to the other router.  When this new laptop started to drop the main router network (which it was on with the Janome and printer), I was told our router was 'long in the tooth" (two years old) and that we should not use the Netgear as it confused the devices.  So they sent us this new Zyxel.  It seems to work well except for the laptop issue.  We have had no problems with the other devices hooked up to it.  It's just the laptop which won't recognize the printer or the Janome.  But I'm using the laptop otherwise and there are no other issues.  Strange, in my experience. 
As always, any suggestions are greatly appreciated.  (Okay, not "you should have bought a MAC") :)

Ceil J
 

Thank you again for all the help.  Today I threw everything at the wall and something stuck.  As my computer was previously dropping my secured network and telling me it was not to be trusted, I came to the conclusion that it was rejecting the new network too.  Not sure if that's it or not. I think the fix came when I turned off the Windows firewalls.  I thought I had tried this fix before but there was a different  firewall page that I was utilizing.  This time my computer search found two (wan and lan).  Now I have a better understanding of some things and luckily didn't have to wipe my hard drive and go through that process.  Thank you to all who offered suggestions.
Ceil


On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 9:54 PM Ceil J via groups.io <cjancola=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Cat, ""access point" or as a "bridge"?"  I haven't a clue.  (Also this is different from what I just sent to you so I'm not sure what I've done here either.  Replying to your last post game me a much bigger font. 
Anyway, we moved about 3 years ago and had used this same type of set up in our previous home.  The main router plugged in and this one used to extend the network (my way of thinking),  I'm fairly sure we used that Netgear router before on it's own, maybe when we had dial up?  I don't remember. 
So at this house we had the teenage grandkids and their parents here once a week and they all had phones and ipads and sometimes the connections didn't seem to work too well so we plugged in the Netgear via Cat cable to the other router.  When this new laptop started to drop the main router network (which it was on with the Janome and printer), I was told our router was 'long in the tooth" (two years old) and that we should not use the Netgear as it confused the devices.  So they sent us this new Zyxel.  It seems to work well except for the laptop issue.  We have had no problems with the other devices hooked up to it.  It's just the laptop which won't recognize the printer or the Janome.  But I'm using the laptop otherwise and there are no other issues.  Strange, in my experience. 
As always, any suggestions are greatly appreciated.  (Okay, not "you should have bought a MAC") :)

Jim Stutsman
 

If you were in a large office, working on government projects with 100s of others, then a firewall would be important. One of the things that your router does (or at least should do) is shield your network from the legions of miscreants trying to find a way in. If you want to see how well your router is doing check it out here: https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2

This is NOT a warm and friendly site. It was created by an engineer, so there isn't much decoration. In fact just figuring out how to make it work is your first challenge. Look for the tiny "Proceed" button in the middle of the page. This will give you a better idea how protected you are. The next page has lots of buttons. Just scan all the standard service ports as a baseline. There are a couple of reasons that Windows is so aggressive with their default firewall settings:

  1. Windows is in most of the computers in the world. There are multiple organizations, legal and illegal, looking for ways to break into it. Every time Microsoft issues patches for security (pretty much every Tuesday) the bad guys dissect the fix to find out the vulnerability so they can take advantage of it before the patch is installed. Many people never install them.
  2. Many people don't use a router, and don't know why it's important.. They just plug their computer into the back of the modem, so it's right out there on the web, completely unprotected. The firewall is the only thing standing between them and disaster.

Ceil J
 

Thanks, Jim.  At this stage I'm reluctant to do ANYTHING that could mess things up. 
The only time I've ever gotten a virus was when my grandchildren were little and my granddaughter liked fairy books.  My daughter and I were on the phone and I was at the computer and wondered if there were any fairy books written for boys.  Now I think for a moment before I google anything. :)
I also only use Windows Defender after suffering for years with paid programs that made my computer run slowly.  That's all I've used for over 10 years now.  As the computer dropped the network when it (mistakenly) didn't feel it was safe, I think I'm okay.  And everything's backed up on two external hard drives and my desktop computer. 
I did go to that site and they detected my address.  That's as far as I dared to go. :)
Thanks again,
Ceil


On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 5:30 PM Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
If you were in a large office, working on government projects with 100s of others, then a firewall would be important. One of the things that your router does (or at least should do) is shield your network from the legions of miscreants trying to find a way in. If you want to see how well your router is doing check it out here: https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2

This is NOT a warm and friendly site. It was created by an engineer, so there isn't much decoration. In fact just figuring out how to make it work is your first challenge. Look for the tiny "Proceed" button in the middle of the page. This will give you a better idea how protected you are. The next page has lots of buttons. Just scan all the standard service ports as a baseline. There are a couple of reasons that Windows is so aggressive with their default firewall settings:

  1. Windows is in most of the computers in the world. There are multiple organizations, legal and illegal, looking for ways to break into it. Every time Microsoft issues patches for security (pretty much every Tuesday) the bad guys dissect the fix to find out the vulnerability so they can take advantage of it before the patch is installed. Many people never install them.
  2. Many people don't use a router, and don't know why it's important.. They just plug their computer into the back of the modem, so it's right out there on the web, completely unprotected. The firewall is the only thing standing between them and disaster.

Helen Moslander
 

Wow! You have so much information available to all of us. Thank you so much for all you guys do. This worked great, told me I am good at this point. 


On Jul 7, 2020, at 2:30 PM, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

If you were in a large office, working on government projects with 100s of others, then a firewall would be important. One of the things that your router does (or at least should do) is shield your network from the legions of miscreants trying to find a way in. If you want to see how well your router is doing check it out here: https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2

This is NOT a warm and friendly site. It was created by an engineer, so there isn't much decoration. In fact just figuring out how to make it work is your first challenge. Look for the tiny "Proceed" button in the middle of the page. This will give you a better idea how protected you are. The next page has lots of buttons. Just scan all the standard service ports as a baseline. There are a couple of reasons that Windows is so aggressive with their default firewall settings:

  1. Windows is in most of the computers in the world. There are multiple organizations, legal and illegal, looking for ways to break into it. Every time Microsoft issues patches for security (pretty much every Tuesday) the bad guys dissect the fix to find out the vulnerability so they can take advantage of it before the patch is installed. Many people never install them.
  2. Many people don't use a router, and don't know why it's important.. They just plug their computer into the back of the modem, so it's right out there on the web, completely unprotected. The firewall is the only thing standing between them and disaster.