Topics

Puckers in embroidery


Joyce VanAtta
 

I have sewn out two wedding samplers from Designs by Juju, and the design is beautiful.
When the first one was finished, there were puckers around the letters.  I decided there was not enough
stabilizer, and sewed out another.  This time I used two iron on stabilizers.  There are puckers again.
The tension is lessened by one on my Janome 15000.  Of course I want to have this done right now. :-))
I will appreciate any and all suggestions.  Thanks.


Mary E
 

I too have issues with puckers. I use midweight stabilizer and then ‘float’ a lightweight piece of stabilizer under that. I make sure that the design is tight in the hoop. That seems to help enormously. If you are using very dense designs, that also adds to puckering. I am usually able to creatively iron out puckers when I am done. 
Mary


On Tuesday, July 21, 2020, Joyce VanAtta via groups.io <shesews4em=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have sewn out two wedding samplers from Designs by Juju, and the design is beautiful.
When the first one was finished, there were puckers around the letters.  I decided there was not enough
stabilizer, and sewed out another.  This time I used two iron on stabilizers.  There are puckers again.
The tension is lessened by one on my Janome 15000.  Of course I want to have this done right now. :-))
I will appreciate any and all suggestions.  Thanks.


Ceil J
 

Not sure if this helps or is the problem you have but I've found that some stabilizer shrink when I use steam.  So now I either steam them ahead of time if possible or don't use steam. 


JANE MORELAND
 

I have been able to mostly eliminate puckering by ironing Pelion 101 (Shape Flex, a woven interfacing) onto the fabric. I hoop and stabilize as usual. 


On Jul 21, 2020, at 7:05 PM, Ceil J <cjancola@...> wrote:

Not sure if this helps or is the problem you have but I've found that some stabilizer shrink when I use steam.  So now I either steam them ahead of time if possible or don't use steam. 


favymtz
 

The stabilizer that's notorius for causing puckering and REALLY needs to be pre-shrunk is the mesh style Cut Away (PolyMesh is one brand name).
It shrinks with heat or water so you can either steam it before using it or soak it in warm water.
If you don't preshrink it you're guaranteed to get puckers when you press the embroidery!
--
Favymtz


Cynthia Dickerson
 

Great tip!!  I will remember that one!!


Stephanie Olson
 

Thanks for the great tip!!


On Wed, Jul 22, 2020 at 10:12 AM Cynthia Dickerson <cindydickerson@...> wrote:
Great tip!!  I will remember that one!!


sewnice@...
 

I use water soluble stabilizer on the bottom and on the top.. no puckers.  
hope this helps
Sharon


Patricia Ward
 

Yes, I use the Pellon SF 101 as well and it really helps.  Also make sure you starch the fabric before you fuse it...  and then do the embroidery using your hooped stabilizers.

Some designs just will pucker more than others and if your fabric is not really stiff and stable then it will draw up esp with letters. 

Pat

On Wed, Jul 22, 2020 at 8:01 AM JANE MORELAND via groups.io <Moreland41=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have been able to mostly eliminate puckering by ironing Pelion 101 (Shape Flex, a woven interfacing) onto the fabric. I hoop and stabilize as usual. 


On Jul 21, 2020, at 7:05 PM, Ceil J <cjancola@...> wrote:

Not sure if this helps or is the problem you have but I've found that some stabilizer shrink when I use steam.  So now I either steam them ahead of time if possible or don't use steam. 


Pixey
 

Thanks for this information.  I use poly mesh style stabilizers (different brands) a lot and did not know it had a reputation for this.  But it could explain some belated puckering I have experienced...which I had attributed it more to the cotton blend t-shirts shrinking even though I had prewashed them rather than the stabilizer.  Once preshrunk, does it then stay stable?

Pixey


On Jul 22, 2020, at 9:12 AM, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:

The stabilizer that's notorius for causing puckering and REALLY needs to be pre-shrunk is the mesh style Cut Away (PolyMesh is one brand name).
It shrinks with heat or water so you can either steam it before using it or soak it in warm water.
If you don't preshrink it you're guaranteed to get puckers when you press the embroidery!
--
Favymtz


Jim Stutsman
 

A good friend sent this in today:

For the people who were having puckered fabric I discovered that changing to a blue tip needle took care of the problem.  I was using 2 layers of tearaway stabilizer and a firmly woven cotton.  Don't know if this would help them, I think the fabric makes a difference.


favymtz
 

Pixey, yes it does stay stable after pre shrinking it. However, I find that it's still rather sensitive to heat, so be careful what it's used on. 
Over the years I discovered that I don't like it much except for on items that won't see an iron! It's often recommended for t-shirts and other clothing, but I was never really thrilled with the results.
My experience is that I do this with clothing: I stiffen up the fabric real good and use either a Tear Away or a Wash Away. And because I digitize I often-times will either create my own designs or alter a purchased design to assure that it isn't too stitch dense for the fabric/clothing. I like my embroidered clothing to maintain a nice drape and not be stiff behind the embroidery.
For items that don't need to be drapey, I will fuse on a lightweight interfacing product as has been mentioned by Jane and Patricia in this conversation. (Shape Flex, Knit Fuse, etc.)
One other thing that I try to remember is what our old friend and master digitizer Maggie Cooper used to say, "If it needs more than one layer of stabilizer, there's something wrong with the digitizing!"
Remember that if you're embroidering clothing, and you have 2 or more layers of TearAway stabilizer under the stitches, those stitches live there forever, making the garment stiff. 
I once purchased a beautiful embroidered dress from a high end store. I knew nothing about machine embroidery at the time but realize now that the stabilizer was a PolyMesh. I assumed that with washing the embroidered area would soften up. It never did. I even trimmed out as much of the PolyMesh as I could, but to no avail. It was an expensive lesson, but one that in years to come helped me to discern a better use of stabilizers!
Favymtz

--
Favymtz 


Kay Davis
 

How do you “stiffen the fabric”?  Or do the stabilizers do that?

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 10:06 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Pixey, yes it does stay stable after pre shrinking it. However, I find that it's still rather sensitive to heat, so be careful what it's used on. 
Over the years I discovered that I don't like it much except for on items that won't see an iron! It's often recommended for t-shirts and other clothing, but I was never really thrilled with the results.
My experience is that I do this with clothing: I stiffen up the fabric real good and use either a Tear Away or a Wash Away. And because I digitize I often-times will either create my own designs or alter a purchased design to assure that it isn't too stitch dense for the fabric/clothing. I like my embroidered clothing to maintain a nice drape and not be stiff behind the embroidery.
For items that don't need to be drapey, I will fuse on a lightweight interfacing product as has been mentioned by Jane and Patricia in this conversation. (Shape Flex, Knit Fuse, etc.)
One other thing that I try to remember is what our old friend and master digitizer Maggie Cooper used to say, "If it needs more than one layer of stabilizer, there's something wrong with the digitizing!"
Remember that if you're embroidering clothing, and you have 2 or more layers of TearAway stabilizer under the stitches, those stitches live there forever, making the garment stiff. 
I once purchased a beautiful embroidered dress from a high end store. I knew nothing about machine embroidery at the time but realize now that the stabilizer was a PolyMesh. I assumed that with washing the embroidered area would soften up. It never did. I even trimmed out as much of the PolyMesh as I could, but to no avail. It was an expensive lesson, but one that in years to come helped me to discern a better use of stabilizers!
Favymtz

--
Favymtz 


Pixey
 

Thanks Jim.  Blue tips are my typical go to needle unless I am working with quilting layers, in which case I go with a purple tip.

Pixey


On Jul 22, 2020, at 2:33 PM, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

A good friend sent this in today:

For the people who were having puckered fabric I discovered that changing to a blue tip needle took care of the problem.  I was using 2 layers of tearaway stabilizer and a firmly woven cotton.  Don't know if this would help them, I think the fabric makes a difference.


Pixey
 

Thanks for this information Favy.  I am definitely looking forward to doing more experimenting with different stabilizers and fabrics.  I too had a problematic starting out effort, in my case it was a purchased bulletproof design on a lightweight fabric.  Oops!

I know so much more now than I did then thanks to others sharing their knowledge.

Pixey


On Jul 23, 2020, at 9:06 AM, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Pixey, yes it does stay stable after pre shrinking it. However, I find that it's still rather sensitive to heat, so be careful what it's used on. 
Over the years I discovered that I don't like it much except for on items that won't see an iron! It's often recommended for t-shirts and other clothing, but I was never really thrilled with the results.
My experience is that I do this with clothing: I stiffen up the fabric real good and use either a Tear Away or a Wash Away. And because I digitize I often-times will either create my own designs or alter a purchased design to assure that it isn't too stitch dense for the fabric/clothing. I like my embroidered clothing to maintain a nice drape and not be stiff behind the embroidery.
For items that don't need to be drapey, I will fuse on a lightweight interfacing product as has been mentioned by Jane and Patricia in this conversation. (Shape Flex, Knit Fuse, etc.)
One other thing that I try to remember is what our old friend and master digitizer Maggie Cooper used to say, "If it needs more than one layer of stabilizer, there's something wrong with the digitizing!"
Remember that if you're embroidering clothing, and you have 2 or more layers of TearAway stabilizer under the stitches, those stitches live there forever, making the garment stiff. 
I once purchased a beautiful embroidered dress from a high end store. I knew nothing about machine embroidery at the time but realize now that the stabilizer was a PolyMesh. I assumed that with washing the embroidered area would soften up. It never did. I even trimmed out as much of the PolyMesh as I could, but to no avail. It was an expensive lesson, but one that in years to come helped me to discern a better use of stabilizers!
Favymtz

--
Favymtz 


favymtz
 

Re Stiffen the fabric:
I Always Use a fabric stiffener to prepare the fabric before embroidery or decorative stitching. (Unless it’s not a washable!)
 I consider this a temporary, but necessary stabilizer!

Heavy Spray Starch
Terial Magic
Odif (a new to me spray-on stiffener)
Gloop=Dissolve scraps of water soluble stabilizer in water

Also, “Best Press” is not adequate for this purpose

Favymtz 

--
Favymtz 


Kay Davis
 

Thanks for the info. Good idea. 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 9:17 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Re Stiffen the fabric:
I Always Use a fabric stiffener to prepare the fabric before embroidery or decorative stitching. (Unless it’s not a washable!)
 I consider this a temporary, but necessary stabilizer!

Heavy Spray Starch
Terial Magic
Odif (a new to me spray-on stiffener)
Gloop=Dissolve scraps of water soluble stabilizer in water

Also, “Best Press” is not adequate for this purpose

Favymtz 

--
Favymtz 


Patricia Ward
 

Hi Favy,  can you tell me  why "Best Press" is not a good thing to use to stiffen fabric.  I have used that for years and had good results.  Is there something that makes the fabric even more stiff?   I am not fond of heavy spray starch because of what it does to the bottom of the iron.   
But sometimes when doing a lot of fabric that needs to be stiff, I will dump it into the washer with a bottle of the liquid starch then line dry it.  

Is the Terial Magic so much better than the Best Press?  

Thank you for the information,

Pat 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 9:17 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Re Stiffen the fabric:
I Always Use a fabric stiffener to prepare the fabric before embroidery or decorative stitching. (Unless it’s not a washable!)
 I consider this a temporary, but necessary stabilizer!

Heavy Spray Starch
Terial Magic
Odif (a new to me spray-on stiffener)
Gloop=Dissolve scraps of water soluble stabilizer in water

Also, “Best Press” is not adequate for this purpose

Favymtz 

--
Favymtz 


Virginia
 

Best Press does not stiffen. Terial Magic will stiffen like a really heavy starch.  I use it to stiffen when I need to cut fabric at times (not all the time)with my cut machine. But other than that I would use Best Press or June Tailor lite spray starch.
 

-------- Original message --------
From: Patricia Ward <ward.pm@...>
Date: 7/24/20 3:59 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] Puckers in embroidery
 
Hi Favy,  can you tell me  why "Best Press" is not a good thing to use to stiffen fabric.  I have used that for years and had good results.  Is there something that makes the fabric even more stiff?   I am not fond of heavy spray starch because of what it does to the bottom of the iron.   
But sometimes when doing a lot of fabric that needs to be stiff, I will dump it into the washer with a bottle of the liquid starch then line dry it.  
 
Is the Terial Magic so much better than the Best Press?  
 
Thank you for the information,
 
Pat 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 9:17 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Re Stiffen the fabric:
I Always Use a fabric stiffener to prepare the fabric before embroidery or decorative stitching. (Unless it’s not a washable!)
 I consider this a temporary, but necessary stabilizer!
 
Heavy Spray Starch
Terial Magic
Odif (a new to me spray-on stiffener)
Gloop=Dissolve scraps of water soluble stabilizer in water
 
Also, “Best Press” is not adequate for this purpose
 
Favymtz 

--
Favymtz 

 

 


favymtz
 

Pat, it's just as Virginia says. 
Best Press is really more of a Sizing product which doesn't stiffen fabric. It's great for fabric that will be cut into pieces for quilt piecing and that kind of thing, BUT for embroidery you need stiffness. Also, the same goes for decorative stitching. Stiff!
Now about pressing Starched Fabric. It will not mess up your iron if you do it properly.
  • Spray a layer on one side of the fabric.
  • Let it soak in for several minutes. Don't shorten this step! Depending on the temperature of your environment this may need to be longer or shorter time. Sometimes I take my fabric outside and let it air dry for a little while.
  • Then turn the fabric over to the opposite side and press dry.
  • Give it a few seconds to cool down a bit.
  • Then spray it again.
  • Let it soak in...
  • Repeat this process at least 2-3 times depending on how stiffened you need the fabric to be. For most cotton fabrics I do 3 times.
This doesn't work with polyester fabric, polyester doesn't absorb the starch.

Why starch messes up an iron:  
  • Because it hasn't absorbed into the fabric
  • You've pressed the wet starch, Press the opposite side.
  • Also, Scorching the fabric will happen if you use a hot iron on the starch side of the fabric and it hasn't absorbed into the fibers well enough.
As you can see this takes a little foresight to plan ahead and prepare the fabric because it takes some extra time. It's well worth your efforts. You'll notice a huge difference in the quality of your embroidered & decorative stitching items.

Now about Terial: It's a great product too. It also requires some planning ahead to prepare the fabric. Best results are to soak the fabric by either spraying it or soaking in a bowl. Let it air dry for quite awhile before you try to press it.
I like it alot for clothing because it is so stiff, BUT I don't like the smell of it at all, so for most of my embroidery I prefer the Starch method.
Also, I have problems with the Terial spotting the fabric, so it has to be washed out, whereas with Starch I don't have the spotting problem.

Hope this helps!
-Favymtz





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Favymtz