newbie 12000 owner & portable hard drive


vicki chrobak
 

Hi everyone--I brought my 12000 home Saturday & have been getting acquainted. So far I find it pretty user-friendly. It doesn't like Floriani thread from the regular spools but I try a thread stand next time.
Does anyone know how to set it up for use with a portable hard drive?

--
Vicki Jo


Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

There are a couple of problems with using an external drive on the machine:

1. The USB ports on the 12000 are not designed to provide a large amount of power. USB flash drives use little power, but an external hard drive requires a large amount of power to spin up from a dead stop. If the port senses that too much power is being requested, it will shut down to protect the machine. This is a good thing, as I'm sure you aren't wanting to have to replace a USB board and/or power supply at this stage! This is what made the Janome-branded CD-ROM drive different from other external CD-ROM drives. It was made to be very low power. Other brands had to have external power. Some external hard drives have the ability to add external power. Usually this is in the form of a short cord that is USB at one end and a small round plug on the other. You might be tempted to power the drive with one of these cables plugged into the second USB port. DON'T DO THAT! It still won't be enough, and you still run the risk of damaging your machine.

2. Even a small external hard drive is going to contain many gigabytes, usually at least 100 or more. Nearly all of them use the NTFS file system, which is good for data safety and stability. It's also required for drives over 120GB. The machine is geared for the FAT file system. If you can get past the power issue, the machine won't be able to make sense of the NTFS file system. If it was able to get the drive to spin up to speed and be readable, you would get the dreaded FAT error message. You could reformat the drive as FAT or FAT-32, but you will lose all that's on it and you will almost certainly reduce the amount of usable storage on the drive.

There are probably other problems as well as these, but the bottom line is that asking your machine to drive a bus filled with passengers, when it expected a bicycle.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, vicki chrobak <tulsajo1@...> wrote:

Hi everyone--I brought my 12000 home Saturday & have been getting
acquainted. So far I find it pretty user-friendly. It doesn't like
Floriani thread from the regular spools but I try a thread stand next time.
Does anyone know how to set it up for use with a portable hard drive?

--
Vicki Jo


vicki chrobak
 

Jim, Thanks for your very thorough answer Guess I'll stay on a bicycle.

--
Vicki Jo

There are a couple of problems with using an external drive on the machine:



1. The USB ports on the 12000 are not designed to provide a large amount
of power. USB flash drives use little power, but an external hard drive
requires a large amount of power to spin up from a dead stop. If the
port senses that too much power is being requested, it will shut down to
protect the machine. This is a good thing, as I'm sure you aren't
wanting to have to replace a USB board and/or power supply at this
stage! This is what made the Janome-branded CD-ROM drive different from
other external CD-ROM drives. It was made to be very low power. Other
brands had to have external power. Some external hard drives have the
ability to add external power. Usually this is in the form of a short
cord that is USB at one end and a small round plug on the other. You
might be tempted to power the drive with one of these cables plugged
into the second USB port. DON'T DO THAT! It still won't be enough, and
you still run the risk of damaging your machine.



2. Even a small external hard drive is going to contain many gigabytes,
usually at least 100 or more. Nearly all of them use the NTFS file
system, which is good for data safety and stability. It's also required
for drives over 120GB. The machine is geared for the FAT file system. If
you can get past the power issue, the machine won't be able to make
sense of the NTFS file system. If it was able to get the drive to spin
up to speed and be readable, you would get the dreaded FAT error
message. You could reformat the drive as FAT or FAT-32, but you will
lose all that's on it and you will almost certainly reduce the amount of
usable storage on the drive.



There are probably other problems as well as these, but the bottom line
is that asking your machine to drive a bus filled with passengers, when
it expected a bicycle.