Topics

Magnets and sewing machines

Kathy Strabel
 

I am toying with the idea of a magnetic hoop to facilitate embroidery on quilt sandwiches. Janome does not appear to make one and the others I have seen online are so expensive. I have seen an ad for a set of strong magnets that the seller claims to be as good as a magnetic hoop, and claims that since the magnets are "closed" when in place on your regular hoop (bottom portion) , that the magnets are no threat to the machine.  You affix several plain metal plates via double-stick tape to the inside rim of your lower hoop, place the fabric over the hoop, then use the strong magnets to hold the fabric (or fabric layers) in the hoop. The magnets are the neodymium type. I am not sure how these differ from everyday type of magnets, such as refrigerator magnets.  Does anyone have any experience with this type of magnet and a sewing/embroidery machine? If so, have you been satisfied with the performance?   Any comments/advice appreciated.
Thank you, this Group is so helpful!
Kathy S.   Camas WA

Jim Stutsman
 

This question is timely, as Diane has been experimenting with magnets to quilt a project she just finished. I'll let her report in detail, once she's left the sewing room for the day.

Diane Stutsman
 

I have been experimenting with magnets on a large quilt with lots of piecing and seams. The quilting hoop is great but the magnets that came with it tend to pop off with a heavily pieced quilt and warm and natural batting. Instead I use a cobbled together frame and fishing magnets. They are strong and have a handle on top. This makes it easy to remove the magnets, slide the quilt, slip in the frame and attach the magnets.

favymtz
 

I saw what might be the same explanation (ad) for some magnets that could be used to simulate a magnetic hoop. In the US there’s a similar version, “Sew Tites”. I haven’t invested in them to experiment in hopes that DIME will release a magnetic hoop sometime soon for our 15000. I contacted them a few months ago and was told it’s on their list of products to make.
In the meantime I use the Acufil ASQ hoop, sometimes with the Topper, sometimes just with the regular ASQ magnets. If the item is real bulky I use the Topper and it’s magnets, if it’s not real bulky I use the clamps the hoop came with.
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Favymtz

bhoryn
 

Can you post a picture?  Thanks 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Wednesday, February 19, 2020, 9:17 AM, Diane Stutsman via Groups.Io <diane.stutsman@...> wrote:

I have been experimenting with magnets on a large quilt with lots of piecing and  seams. The quilting hoop is great but the magnets that came with it tend to pop off with a heavily pieced quilt and warm and natural batting. Instead I use a cobbled together frame and fishing magnets. They are strong and have a handle on top. This makes it easy to remove the magnets, slide the quilt, slip in the frame and attach the magnets.


Kathy Strabel
 

Diane and Jim--Thanks for the info re: magnets. I have never heard of "fishing magnets"---where would one find them, at a sporting goods store?  You said you use a "cobbled together hoop". What exactly does that mean? You have to use the original (lower ) hoop because that is where the attachment is to the embroidery arm, is that not correct?   I am still considering a DIY magnetic hoop, but want to be very clear about the process before I try anything. If you prefer, we can communicate privately.
Thanks 
Kathy Strabel   ksbappa@...

On Wed, Feb 19, 2020 at 6:17 AM Diane Stutsman via Groups.Io <diane.stutsman=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have been experimenting with magnets on a large quilt with lots of piecing and  seams. The quilting hoop is great but the magnets that came with it tend to pop off with a heavily pieced quilt and warm and natural batting. Instead I use a cobbled together frame and fishing magnets. They are strong and have a handle on top. This makes it easy to remove the magnets, slide the quilt, slip in the frame and attach the magnets.





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Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel




wlstarn@...
 

The magnets don't affect the computer?  Years ago, we were told not to use magnetic pincushion near the sewing machine because it would damage the computer.

On Wednesday, February 19, 2020 Diane Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> wrote:

I have been experimenting with magnets on a large quilt with lots of piecing and  seams. The quilting hoop is great but the magnets that came with it tend to pop off with a heavily pieced quilt and warm and natural batting. Instead I use a cobbled together frame and fishing magnets. They are strong and have a handle on top. This makes it easy to remove the magnets, slide the quilt, slip in the frame and attach the magnets.


Elizabeth Mccall
 

Hi Diane & JIM, Can you sen along  more information via the Group? . Are you using the 15000, and what frame/hoop are you using?    What needle and what thread  are you using for a heavy project? 
Can you send a photo to show  WHAT  is a Fishing Magnet, and  where do you get them,, & how many needed try this technique ?
Thanks, 
Elizabeth McCall
Western NC
 

On Wed, Feb 19, 2020 at 9:17 AM Diane Stutsman via Groups.Io <diane.stutsman=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have been experimenting with magnets on a large quilt with lots of piecing and  seams. The quilting hoop is great but the magnets that came with it tend to pop off with a heavily pieced quilt and warm and natural batting. Instead I use a cobbled together frame and fishing magnets. They are strong and have a handle on top. This makes it easy to remove the magnets, slide the quilt, slip in the frame and attach the magnets.



Kris Tingley
 

Where did you get your frame


On Wed, Feb 19, 2020 at 9:17 AM, Diane Stutsman via Groups.Io
<diane.stutsman@...> wrote:
I have been experimenting with magnets on a large quilt with lots of piecing and  seams. The quilting hoop is great but the magnets that came with it tend to pop off with a heavily pieced quilt and warm and natural batting. Instead I use a cobbled together frame and fishing magnets. They are strong and have a handle on top. This makes it easy to remove the magnets, slide the quilt, slip in the frame and attach the magnets.


blue_lak
 

What strength magnets are you using? Are they the round type with the screw-on eye bolt? Inquiring minds would like to know....

Nyssa Lanzafame
 

wow!  @Diane Stutsman would love to see a picture of this set up!!!


On Wed, Feb 19, 2020 at 9:17 AM Diane Stutsman via Groups.Io <diane.stutsman=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have been experimenting with magnets on a large quilt with lots of piecing and  seams. The quilting hoop is great but the magnets that came with it tend to pop off with a heavily pieced quilt and warm and natural batting. Instead I use a cobbled together frame and fishing magnets. They are strong and have a handle on top. This makes it easy to remove the magnets, slide the quilt, slip in the frame and attach the magnets.



Sewhat
 

I would love to see a picture of your fantastic fishing magnets and frame.  Amazing

Donna Strode


On Wednesday, February 19, 2020, 4:46:58 PM EST, Nyssa Lanzafame <nyssajoe@...> wrote:


wow!  @Diane Stutsman would love to see a picture of this set up!!!


On Wed, Feb 19, 2020 at 9:17 AM Diane Stutsman via Groups.Io <diane.stutsman=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have been experimenting with magnets on a large quilt with lots of piecing and  seams. The quilting hoop is great but the magnets that came with it tend to pop off with a heavily pieced quilt and warm and natural batting. Instead I use a cobbled together frame and fishing magnets. They are strong and have a handle on top. This makes it easy to remove the magnets, slide the quilt, slip in the frame and attach the magnets.



Diane Stutsman
 

This whole idea started when I found that there is no magnetic hoop that will fit the Janome from a (nameless) third party. The ASQ 22 Janome hoop is great for hooping and quilting light weight quilts. The one I just finished was the  Bonnie Hunter mystery scrap quilt with over 3000 pieces. Add that to Warm and Natural batting and the backing, and it was nearly impossible to use the magnets that came with the hoop. Even when I could clamp them on they often popped off during the quilting. That’s when I bought the heavy duty fishing magnets. They worked sort of, but the quilt was too loose in the hoop and tended to move. Jim and I spent quite a bit of time brainstorming then some more time at Home Depot. That is the cobbled together version. It has 1” molding, 1/4” square dowel, corner brackets, gorilla glue, thumb tacks and lots of tape. It really looks terrible but I used it for two whole days and it did the trick. Enter Jim.....”There’s got to be be something better. You need metal rods.” As we walked our 3.25 miles we kept throwing out ideas about how to hook metal rods together. Braiiinstorm, I had left over tent poles (don’t ask) we cut 4 pieces and strung them together with the cord they come with and tied the corner. It works perfectly. Just attach the template to the area, slide the frame into the hoop and put the magnets on the sides. The magnets hold the frame in place and the design stitches perfectly. Just make sure there is no drag on the quilt. Note: 6 magnets work but I just ordered another set to allow at least two on each side.

favymtz
 

Please help us out by posting some pictures of what you’ve designed.
I too have never heard of fishing magnets and just looked them up online. It still looks like a mystery!
Thanks Diane.

Favymtz

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Favymtz 

Jim Stutsman
 

Brenda Adams
 

I’ve look for the magnets. Seen any where from 40lb up to 1700 lb pulling force. What is yours?

penneyippen
 

I see a great proto-type for a new adventure!  We need magnetic hoops just like those other brands!  Just saying... ps hello from Grand Rapids/Muskegon MI.

Pat
 

I, too, am very confused about using magnets on or near my 15000.  I'd like to use a magnetic seam guide, but don't dare.  I also have magnetic pin cushions, that I keep away from her.  Can anyone give us a definitive answer?  Also, what can be said of using those same near a Viking Designer SE or a Bernina?  Thank you very much, your help and expertise is appreciated.

Pat Kowalczyk

On Wed, Feb 19, 2020 at 4:44 PM wlstarn via Groups.Io <wlstarn=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

The magnets don't affect the computer?  Years ago, we were told not to use magnetic pincushion near the sewing machine because it would damage the computer.

On Wednesday, February 19, 2020 Diane Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> wrote:

I have been experimenting with magnets on a large quilt with lots of piecing and  seams. The quilting hoop is great but the magnets that came with it tend to pop off with a heavily pieced quilt and warm and natural batting. Instead I use a cobbled together frame and fishing magnets. They are strong and have a handle on top. This makes it easy to remove the magnets, slide the quilt, slip in the frame and attach the magnets.


Jim Stutsman
 

This question comes up so often I should have a ready-to-paste answer, but I don't. So here's the story. In olden times (pre-iPhone) some top of line machines used magnetic switches for various sensors. If a strong magnet got too close to the machine it could cause one of those switches to close, causing the machine to sense that something had happened that actually did not. Chaos ensued. These days optical switches are the norm, where a mechanical item breaks a beam of light. These types of sensors are not affected by magnets. In Janome top loading machines there is a magnet under the bobbin case. It's strength is very carefully designed so it holds the case down, but not so tightly that a stitch cannot slide under the case. If you were to put a super strong magnet right on top of the bobbin area it might pull the case up enough to cause the noise/nest/panic we've all come to know at some point. However if the magnet were close enough to do that you wouldn't be able to sew because the needle would break when it hit the magnet. So feel free to use your magnetic pin cushions, fishing magnets, or whatever. Just don't attempt to use your machine inside an MRI machine! Consider this - if magnets were dangerous to your machine, why did Janome use them on their quilting hoops?

wlstarn@...
 

Thank you!  I ❤️ my magnetic pincushion.  But maybe I should use caution around the 1989  Pfaff.

On Thursday, February 20, 2020 Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> wrote:

This question comes up so often I should have a ready-to-paste answer, but I don't. So here's the story. In olden times (pre-iPhone) some top of line machines used magnetic switches for various sensors. If a strong magnet got too close to the machine it could cause one of those switches to close, causing the machine to sense that something had happened that actually did not. Chaos ensued. These days optical switches are the norm, where a mechanical item breaks a beam of light. These types of sensors are not affected by magnets. In Janome top loading machines there is a magnet under the bobbin case. It's strength is very carefully designed so it holds the case down, but not so tightly that a stitch cannot slide under the case. If you were to put a super strong magnet right on top of the bobbin area it might pull the case up enough to cause the noise/nest/panic we've all come to know at some point. However if the magnet were close enough to do that you wouldn't be able to sew because the needle would break when it hit the magnet. So feel free to use your magnetic pin cushions, fishing magnets, or whatever. Just don't attempt to use your machine inside an MRI machine! Consider this - if magnets were dangerous to your machine, why did Janome use them on their quilting hoops?