Info about the bobbin thread problem when doing embroidery


Julie
 

I have not tried the embroidery part of the machine yet to know, but several people in my sewing group have had problems with the low bobbin indicator when doing embroidery.  After having the dealer work on their machines they discovered that there is a problem with the indicator and Janome is aware of it.  From what they told me, it is going to require that the dealer have a “tool” to fix this problem.  The only problem on that is that Janome doesn’t have enough tools to go around to send to the dealers. 

 

From what I understand this is not a problem that can be fixed with an update.   It is going to require an adjustment of the machine from your dealer AFTER he gets the “tool”, whatever this tool may be. 

Now, this is only what I’ve been told by friends that have had the problem, so I’m not an authority on this, but thought I’d try to shed some light on what is happening with everyone.

 

In the meantime, the only “fix” is that you take out the bobbin thread that is low and put another one in.  They have told me that there is probably 1/3 of thread left on the bobbin when this happens and it doesn’t matter what you have your machine set for in telling it how low to go.

 

Jim, you might have more information about this “tool”.

 

Julie in TX


stitchnpatch
 

Julie - that's really interesting as I was talking to my dealer this morning about and he didn't know how to get around the problem. I have just done some embroidery stitching and my machine is set on the lowest alert number, 1, and wouldn't accept a bobbin with less than 8 yards of thread on it (I tried 3 different ones and measured the thread on each of them. Also as it was stitching out when it got to the point of alerting me and stopped it still had 4 yards of thread on the bobbin and wouldn't start again. In future I will just have to use the ends of bobbins on my 350e until it can be adjusted.
Vicki


Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Assuming this is true, the "tool" is probably nothing more than a set of reference bobbins. These are special metal bobbins that have a specific core size. One represents an empty state and the other almost empty. The adjustment is dirt-simple: you activate diagnostics and put in one bobbin, touch a key to take a reading and store it in a memory. Repeat with the other bobbin and other memory, done. This bobbin set originated with the 10000. I would guess that either they ran out of them, or they have a new set. We probably would not be seeing the problem unless they were not being calibrated during machine assembly. Our machine has been fine, so I have not done any calibration on the bobbin sensor. Note that when you get a low bobbin message for a not-empty bobbin, if you ignore (and don't touch) the message, you can continue to sew. Yes, this is annoying, but probably less annoying than having a drawer full of 1/3 full bobbins!

This is somewhat typical of a new product from any company. The higher the price of the product, the more irritating the problem is to the user. Manufacturers do their best to prevent such problems, but humans are still imperfect and they will probably never be able to make perfect products. If you find yourself getting overly angry, sew for a while on Grandma's treadle until you realize that your "flawed" machine is still an amazing piece of technology. Then make yourself a cup of tea and a plate of cookies. Given the season, it's acceptable to add some peppermint schnaps to the tea and substitute fudge for the cookies!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Julie" <jjems@...> wrote:

I have not tried the embroidery part of the machine yet to know, but several
people in my sewing group have had problems with the low bobbin indicator
when doing embroidery. After having the dealer work on their machines they
discovered that there is a problem with the indicator and Janome is aware of
it. From what they told me, it is going to require that the dealer have a
"tool" to fix this problem. The only problem on that is that Janome doesn't
have enough tools to go around to send to the dealers.



From what I understand this is not a problem that can be fixed with an
update. It is going to require an adjustment of the machine from your
dealer AFTER he gets the "tool", whatever this tool may be.

Now, this is only what I've been told by friends that have had the problem,
so I'm not an authority on this, but thought I'd try to shed some light on
what is happening with everyone.



In the meantime, the only "fix" is that you take out the bobbin thread that
is low and put another one in. They have told me that there is probably 1/3
of thread left on the bobbin when this happens and it doesn't matter what
you have your machine set for in telling it how low to go.



Jim, you might have more information about this "tool".



Julie in TX


Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Update - I have looked at the diagnostics screen for updating the bobbin sensor and discovered that it has 3 values: Empty, Half full, and Full. This would indicate that 3 reference bobbins are needed, which is why nobody has them. There may be some other black magic involve, as I could make changes to the settings but could not apply them. It simply gives me a "No you can't do that!" double beep. I guess we'll have to wait for more information from Mama Janome.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@...> wrote:

Assuming this is true, the "tool" is probably nothing more than a set of reference bobbins. These are special metal bobbins that have a specific core size. One represents an empty state and the other almost empty. The adjustment is dirt-simple: you activate diagnostics and put in one bobbin, touch a key to take a reading and store it in a memory. Repeat with the other bobbin and other memory, done. This bobbin set originated with the 10000. I would guess that either they ran out of them, or they have a new set. We probably would not be seeing the problem unless they were not being calibrated during machine assembly. Our machine has been fine, so I have not done any calibration on the bobbin sensor. Note that when you get a low bobbin message for a not-empty bobbin, if you ignore (and don't touch) the message, you can continue to sew. Yes, this is annoying, but probably less annoying than having a drawer full of 1/3 full bobbins!

This is somewhat typical of a new product from any company. The higher the price of the product, the more irritating the problem is to the user. Manufacturers do their best to prevent such problems, but humans are still imperfect and they will probably never be able to make perfect products. If you find yourself getting overly angry, sew for a while on Grandma's treadle until you realize that your "flawed" machine is still an amazing piece of technology. Then make yourself a cup of tea and a plate of cookies. Given the season, it's acceptable to add some peppermint schnaps to the tea and substitute fudge for the cookies!


Julie
 

The only other information that I was told about this tool that I didn't mention is that Janome only has 2 of these tools in stock at the moment - so it sounds more like it's an actualy tool that will be used to do something on the machine rather than a set of bobbins, and this tool will have to be sent to dealers to correct the problem. I'm not sure why Janome only has 2 of them and what the process is they will use to get more. Again, I'm just relaying information from friends that are having this problem and what their dealer has told them. I need to set up my machine and do embroidery and see if it happens to me! At this point, I don't even know that.

Julie

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@...> wrote:

Update - I have looked at the diagnostics screen for updating the bobbin sensor and discovered that it has 3 values: Empty, Half full, and Full. This would indicate that 3 reference bobbins are needed, which is why nobody has them. There may be some other black magic involve, as I could make changes to the settings but could not apply them. It simply gives me a "No you can't do that!" double beep. I guess we'll have to wait for more information from Mama Janome.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@> wrote:

Assuming this is true, the "tool" is probably nothing more than a set of reference bobbins. These are special metal bobbins that have a specific core size. One represents an empty state and the other almost empty. The adjustment is dirt-simple: you activate diagnostics and put in one bobbin, touch a key to take a reading and store it in a memory. Repeat with the other bobbin and other memory, done. This bobbin set originated with the 10000. I would guess that either they ran out of them, or they have a new set. We probably would not be seeing the problem unless they were not being calibrated during machine assembly. Our machine has been fine, so I have not done any calibration on the bobbin sensor. Note that when you get a low bobbin message for a not-empty bobbin, if you ignore (and don't touch) the message, you can continue to sew. Yes, this is annoying, but probably less annoying than having a drawer full of 1/3 full bobbins!

This is somewhat typical of a new product from any company. The higher the price of the product, the more irritating the problem is to the user. Manufacturers do their best to prevent such problems, but humans are still imperfect and they will probably never be able to make perfect products. If you find yourself getting overly angry, sew for a while on Grandma's treadle until you realize that your "flawed" machine is still an amazing piece of technology. Then make yourself a cup of tea and a plate of cookies. Given the season, it's acceptable to add some peppermint schnaps to the tea and substitute fudge for the cookies!


Vikki Youngmeyer
 

Taking this one step further, would you have to use metal bobbins for calibration? Why couldn’t you fill three plastic Janome bobbins with a varying amounts of thread, keep them separate from other bobbins and use them as “controls” to put the info into memory? If you ever needed to recalibrate, you would have your own set.

 

Incidentally, I have owned 2 Janome embroidery machines had “low bobbin” sensors. Both registered “low bobbin” messages with about 1/3 of the thread remaining on the bobbin. Both the 350e and the 12000 allowed me to continue on until I ran out of thread.

 

Vikki

Houston, TX

 


Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

The metal calibration bobbins are not "real" bobbins. They are specially constructed bobbin-shaped pieces with different sized cores for empty, 1/2 full, and full. You could potentially use regular bobbins, but variations in thread sponginess would not be very precise. Further the procedure involves using the on-board diagnostics, which can turn your machine into a brick if used incorrectly. This calibration is usually a one-time event done only at the factory or by a trained technician, and once done it would only have to be repeated if the bobbin sensor parts were changed.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Vikki Youngmeyer" <vikkiy@...> wrote:

Taking this one step further, would you have to use metal bobbins for
calibration? Why couldn't you fill three plastic Janome bobbins with a
varying amounts of thread, keep them separate from other bobbins and use
them as "controls" to put the info into memory? If you ever needed to
recalibrate, you would have your own set.



Incidentally, I have owned 2 Janome embroidery machines had "low bobbin"
sensors. Both registered "low bobbin" messages with about 1/3 of the thread
remaining on the bobbin. Both the 350e and the 12000 allowed me to continue
on until I ran out of thread.



Vikki

Houston, TX