In the hoop


Tericloth
 

Thank you again Pixie for your helpful advice,  finished my first ITH!!! Not perfect, but I don't care, I did it, and will be doing more!

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Pixey
 

I am glad it helped.  This is cute and a good first effort.

One tip on doing ITH projects…your selection of scissors is probably the most important part of your supporting toolkit.  If you haven’t already done so, you are going to want to invest in some with sharp tips that give you a lot of control in cutting in tight around curves and straight lines.  Curved blades, small duck billed, sharp points, etc. Also, unlike denser designs where you want to use the smallest hoop for the design to keep the stabilizer snug, with ITH projects you may actually want to go with a slightly larger hoop to have room to get in and trim around the outline of the project.  This can especially be an issue with the 500/550 machine because there is less clearance between the stitch field and hoop than some of the other Janome machines.

Pixey

On Sep 18, 2021, at 1:40 PM, Tericloth <tericloth6@...> wrote:


Thank you again Pixie for your helpful advice,  finished my first ITH!!! Not perfect, but I don't care, I did it, and will be doing more!

Sent from my T-Mobile 5G Device
Get Outlook for Android
_._,_._,_


Tericloth
 

Yes!!! Thank you, I did learn that I need better scissors!! Very fun!!


From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> on behalf of Pixey via groups.io <pixeyam@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 18, 2021 5:06 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] In the hoop
 
I am glad it helped.  This is cute and a good first effort.

One tip on doing ITH projects…your selection of scissors is probably the most important part of your supporting toolkit.  If you haven’t already done so, you are going to want to invest in some with sharp tips that give you a lot of control in cutting in tight around curves and straight lines.  Curved blades, small duck billed, sharp points, etc. Also, unlike denser designs where you want to use the smallest hoop for the design to keep the stabilizer snug, with ITH projects you may actually want to go with a slightly larger hoop to have room to get in and trim around the outline of the project.  This can especially be an issue with the 500/550 machine because there is less clearance between the stitch field and hoop than some of the other Janome machines.

Pixey

On Sep 18, 2021, at 1:40 PM, Tericloth <tericloth6@...> wrote:


Thank you again Pixie for your helpful advice,  finished my first ITH!!! Not perfect, but I don't care, I did it, and will be doing more!

Sent from my T-Mobile 5G Device
Get Outlook for Android


ladybug35186
 

Thanks! That's really good information about using a slightly larger hoop for ITH projects. 


-----Original Message-----
From: Tericloth <tericloth6@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Sep 19, 2021 6:20 am
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] In the hoop

Yes!!! Thank you, I did learn that I need better scissors!! Very fun!!

From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> on behalf of Pixey via groups.io <pixeyam@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 18, 2021 5:06 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] In the hoop
 
I am glad it helped.  This is cute and a good first effort.

One tip on doing ITH projects…your selection of scissors is probably the most important part of your supporting toolkit.  If you haven’t already done so, you are going to want to invest in some with sharp tips that give you a lot of control in cutting in tight around curves and straight lines.  Curved blades, small duck billed, sharp points, etc. Also, unlike denser designs where you want to use the smallest hoop for the design to keep the stabilizer snug, with ITH projects you may actually want to go with a slightly larger hoop to have room to get in and trim around the outline of the project.  This can especially be an issue with the 500/550 machine because there is less clearance between the stitch field and hoop than some of the other Janome machines.

Pixey

On Sep 18, 2021, at 1:40 PM, Tericloth <tericloth6@...> wrote:


Thank you again Pixie for your helpful advice,  finished my first ITH!!! Not perfect, but I don't care, I did it, and will be doing more!

Sent from my T-Mobile 5G Device
Get Outlook for Android


Cheryl Paul
 

In Canada (can’t speak for other parts of the world) Janome has a cute little “Mini Duckling” scissors. It works really well for getting into close spaces. As Michael Smith of Janome Nations Consumer Educator says, “It always works better if it says Janome on it.”

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Kathy Strabel
 

Terricloth (and others). Regarding good scissors: Yes, excellent scissors are a must for sewing and embroidery. I have several types---duckbill, curved, notched, etc. and I use them all. I have found that the KAI scissors are the best for trimming embroidery jumpstitches cleanly away from the top side of embroideries. While I find the finger holes a little tight on the smallest KAI scissors, I find that the slight curve of the blade and the very very thin blades make for good cuts that do not leave any of those annoying "tails" behind.   If only KAI scissors would make the finger holes more rounded, rather than a flat-ish oval, they would be be 100% perfect.  The thin blades is what keeps me using them.
Happy stitching---and cutting!!
Kathy Strabel   Camas WA


Moira Rogow
 

That is super cute!


On Sun, Sep 19, 2021 at 10:03 AM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Terricloth (and others). Regarding good scissors: Yes, excellent scissors are a must for sewing and embroidery. I have several types---duckbill, curved, notched, etc. and I use them all. I have found that the KAI scissors are the best for trimming embroidery jumpstitches cleanly away from the top side of embroideries. While I find the finger holes a little tight on the smallest KAI scissors, I find that the slight curve of the blade and the very very thin blades make for good cuts that do not leave any of those annoying "tails" behind.   If only KAI scissors would make the finger holes more rounded, rather than a flat-ish oval, they would be be 100% perfect.  The thin blades is what keeps me using them.
Happy stitching---and cutting!!
Kathy Strabel   Camas WA


ladybug35186
 

Thanks for the recommendation of scissors - always good information!


-----Original Message-----
From: Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Sun, Sep 19, 2021 10:03 am
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] In the hoop

Terricloth (and others). Regarding good scissors: Yes, excellent scissors are a must for sewing and embroidery. I have several types---duckbill, curved, notched, etc. and I use them all. I have found that the KAI scissors are the best for trimming embroidery jumpstitches cleanly away from the top side of embroideries. While I find the finger holes a little tight on the smallest KAI scissors, I find that the slight curve of the blade and the very very thin blades make for good cuts that do not leave any of those annoying "tails" behind.   If only KAI scissors would make the finger holes more rounded, rather than a flat-ish oval, they would be be 100% perfect.  The thin blades is what keeps me using them.
Happy stitching---and cutting!!
Kathy Strabel   Camas WA