Topics

How Would You Do This?

Kathy Strabel
 

Hello, Group!
Hope your 4th was enjoyable and safe--in all ways.

I need some opinions on a simple project. I want to make some potholders that will have words only embroidered on their fronts, and I want them to be quilted so that they are actually safe to use. I will be using batting appropriate for potholders, but I can't recall the names or brands of the batting that fits that description.  So that is my first request--what batting have you used for pot holders, and how have you liked what you used?  Any special things to know about the products?

  Number 2: I don't think the fronts of the potholders will lend itself well with quilting, because it will just be satin stitched words, so no motifs to just stitch around., and a grid of quilting might just interfere with the words.  So, how would you approach this? I was thinking maybe constructing the potholders in 2 quilted layers with just a plain fabric for the front, and a patterned fabric for the back. Then overlaying a layer on the front, quilted side. This overlay would be the embroidered words on a lightweight twill cotton fabric.  I would then bind all layers together.  Should I also bond the overlay to the quilted layer that would be underneath it, using a fusible product?  I know fusibles are not usually natural fibers and melt easily.    Any alternates to a fusible? Do I even need that??

Thanks in advance for your thoughts on this.... I just want to make this "reality check" to see if I am thinking correctly.

Kathy Strabel   Camas WA

dmrestates
 

I would just quilt around the words.



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...>
Date: 7/5/20 6:13 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] How Would You Do This?

Hello, Group!
Hope your 4th was enjoyable and safe--in all ways.

I need some opinions on a simple project. I want to make some potholders that will have words only embroidered on their fronts, and I want them to be quilted so that they are actually safe to use. I will be using batting appropriate for potholders, but I can't recall the names or brands of the batting that fits that description.  So that is my first request--what batting have you used for pot holders, and how have you liked what you used?  Any special things to know about the products?

  Number 2: I don't think the fronts of the potholders will lend itself well with quilting, because it will just be satin stitched words, so no motifs to just stitch around., and a grid of quilting might just interfere with the words.  So, how would you approach this? I was thinking maybe constructing the potholders in 2 quilted layers with just a plain fabric for the front, and a patterned fabric for the back. Then overlaying a layer on the front, quilted side. This overlay would be the embroidered words on a lightweight twill cotton fabric.  I would then bind all layers together.  Should I also bond the overlay to the quilted layer that would be underneath it, using a fusible product?  I know fusibles are not usually natural fibers and melt easily.    Any alternates to a fusible? Do I even need that??

Thanks in advance for your thoughts on this.... I just want to make this "reality check" to see if I am thinking correctly.

Kathy Strabel   Camas WA

Cheryl Alm
 

Insul-bright is a good choice for a batting in potholders.  I would not use a fusible to bond your embroidered piece to the quilted layer. I think your plan will work well to bind all the layers together.


From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> on behalf of Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...>
Sent: Sunday, July 5, 2020 4:01:05 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] How Would You Do This?
 
Hello, Group!
Hope your 4th was enjoyable and safe--in all ways.

I need some opinions on a simple project. I want to make some potholders that will have words only embroidered on their fronts, and I want them to be quilted so that they are actually safe to use. I will be using batting appropriate for potholders, but I can't recall the names or brands of the batting that fits that description.  So that is my first request--what batting have you used for pot holders, and how have you liked what you used?  Any special things to know about the products?

  Number 2: I don't think the fronts of the potholders will lend itself well with quilting, because it will just be satin stitched words, so no motifs to just stitch around., and a grid of quilting might just interfere with the words.  So, how would you approach this? I was thinking maybe constructing the potholders in 2 quilted layers with just a plain fabric for the front, and a patterned fabric for the back. Then overlaying a layer on the front, quilted side. This overlay would be the embroidered words on a lightweight twill cotton fabric.  I would then bind all layers together.  Should I also bond the overlay to the quilted layer that would be underneath it, using a fusible product?  I know fusibles are not usually natural fibers and melt easily.    Any alternates to a fusible? Do I even need that??

Thanks in advance for your thoughts on this.... I just want to make this "reality check" to see if I am thinking correctly.

Kathy Strabel   Camas WA

Roberta K
 

Hi Kathy,

The name of the product is Insulbrite. Center your embroidery, and possibly use a frame. You can use the frame as a border for your quilting. You can use a walking foot and go diagonally back and forth from the frame to the edges of the fabric.

Roberta K
 

Sorry I forgot to sign my message.

Roberta in FL

vicki J. Wardwell
 

Cut all 3 front batting back same exact size Place a center dot at beginning of Word when all re-hooped be sure the needle goes to center dot first.
When you design the quilting it must go to center dot first then proceed to quilt the area around the word.
I would carefully center  hoop top fabric then embroider the word then i would re-hoop place batting for heat under top and under it the backing fabric of the potholder match up the edges [ the embroidered one will of course shrink a bit re-hoop all 3.
Good luck.
Insul brite is the batting;
--
Vicki Jane Hull- Wardwell

Kathy Strabel
 

Thank you to all that took the time to reply to my request for suggestions on how to layer and quilt a potholder. I have not been able to complete the project because I have found that the lettering in the design I want to use is not stitching out very well. I contacted the company where I bought the design, and they said they could see where the lettering could use some improvements and that they would contact the digitizer to see if the design could be altered or improved, and if that was not possible, I could get a refund for that design. I think that is a good policy because most places that supply any kind of digital product say that they do not do refunds, exchanges --and some don't even accept any change orders or cancellations. I am awaiting a follow-up to see if the design I chose can actually be made to look its best. 

 In the past, I had a similar problem with a vintage-type of floral design. The very tiny centers of some of the flowers pulled out immediately. I saw them stitch into the fabric, but they un-ravelled when I took the project out of the hoop. The company actually re-worked the design for me in a new file. They said that sometimes very small items like dots or flower centers with very few stitches don't seem to "obey" the tie-off at the end of that particular small element of a design.    I know that some stitching errors are "Operator Error", but in these two cases, that was not the case. Before you complain to a design seller, be sure that you are using the best combination of hoop, fabric, stabilizer, needle,  thread type and size, tension, bobbin thread, etc. And do several different  test stitch-outs to eliminate the possibility of said "Operator Error".   Happy stitching to all and stay cool, safe and healthy!!!
Kathy Strabel   Camas WA

vicki J. Wardwell
 

Only do the word on one layer the front fabric heavy wash-away stabilizer Do not stitch the center placement dot.
--
Vicki Jane Hull- Wardwell