Hope you and Diane are safe


Ceil J
 

Hi Jim,
As I keep seeing the reports from Texas (and not asking for your exact location) I hope that you and Diane are safe from all the adverse weather and its effects.
Here, we're dealing with the usual bitter cold, snow and storms but since that's normal we have a portable generator to help us in case the power goes out.
Thank you again for all you do and hope you're both warm and well.
Ceil


Jim Stutsman
 

Thanks for asking. Yes, we're fine. Our little neighborhood was built in two phases, back in 2005. We're in the first one, which is on the same electric leg as a 24 hour Kroger and a Walmart Supercenter. Those have been deemed "essential services", probably because of food in fridges and freezers. So we have had uninterrupted power. All of our 3 sons live within a few miles. The oldest is on a schedule of 30 minutes of power with one hour of blackout. Middle is on rotating blackouts, youngest has had some blackouts but is now on full power. That might be due to someone critically ill in his neighborhood. Texas gets 10% of its power from wind. With the cold that's down to 2%. The rest comes mostly from plants fired by natural gas. However most people's homes are also built to use natural gas, and some of the gas pipelines have frozen, so they can't ramp up. We're keeping the thermostat low and lights off to minimize use, but it's very dire for a lot of people. So far 9 have died, mostly from carbon monoxide as they are trying to get heat in their homes. We've got food, LOTS of quilts, and enough food for at least a week. It hasn't been this cold in Texas in more than 70 years and there were no wind farms then and a lot less people. Once it's over there will likely be a lot of damage from frozen pipes.


Ceil J
 

Glad to learn that you, Diane, and your family are well!
It always amazes me when confronted with the reality that we all live in our own little bubbles.  If you had asked me how Texans get their electric/energy I would have said, oil!  We too often make assumptions about how others live.  I was scolded in a FB group for not going to my "local" quilt shop to get something (a Creative Grid's ruler) that I ordered from Amazon.  I only posted to caution others that it was a fake.  I'm in my 70's and local quilt shops are 45 minutes away. 
Anyway, relieved to learn you are both well and I hope others in the group are safe too but I guess if they have no electricity, we won't know for a time. 
Another great day for quilting (here). :) Ceil


Shirley Allen
 

Yes Jim and Diane, Hope you and your family are safe and have heat to keep warm. It seems we are making up for a mild winter last year. We are bracing for another snow storm here tomorrow. Stay well and safe Shirley from NJ


Pixey
 

And unfortunately it is not over yet...as things are starting to thaw, the pipe breaks are causing water shortages and some areas are seeing water boiling requirements.

Pixey (who is about 180 miles south of Jim and Diane in Texas and has been dealing with rolling outages)


On Feb 17, 2021, at 9:35 AM, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

Thanks for asking. Yes, we're fine. Our little neighborhood was built in two phases, back in 2005. We're in the first one, which is on the same electric leg as a 24 hour Kroger and a Walmart Supercenter. Those have been deemed "essential services", probably because of food in fridges and freezers. So we have had uninterrupted power. All of our 3 sons live within a few miles. The oldest is on a schedule of 30 minutes of power with one hour of blackout. Middle is on rotating blackouts, youngest has had some blackouts but is now on full power. That might be due to someone critically ill in his neighborhood. Texas gets 10% of its power from wind. With the cold that's down to 2%. The rest comes mostly from plants fired by natural gas. However most people's homes are also built to use natural gas, and some of the gas pipelines have frozen, so they can't ramp up. We're keeping the thermostat low and lights off to minimize use, but it's very dire for a lot of people. So far 9 have died, mostly from carbon monoxide as they are trying to get heat in their homes. We've got food, LOTS of quilts, and enough food for at least a week. It hasn't been this cold in Texas in more than 70 years and there were no wind farms then and a lot less people. Once it's over there will likely be a lot of damage from frozen pipes.


Sharleen Brett
 

We are from Texas (DFW area) but have lived in SC for almost 2 years now. Would you believe we moved here to get away from the heat?! We have lots of family & friends in the DFW area, Austin, & Lubbock. They seem to be doing pretty well so far, but my heart goes out to everyone in Texas. Prayers are being sent your way . . .

Sharleen Brett                                         



On Feb 17, 2021, at 9:52 PM, Pixey via groups.io <pixeyam@...> wrote:

And unfortunately it is not over yet...as things are starting to thaw, the pipe breaks are causing water shortages and some areas are seeing water boiling requirements.

Pixey (who is about 180 miles south of Jim and Diane in Texas and has been dealing with rolling outages)


On Feb 17, 2021, at 9:35 AM, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

Thanks for asking. Yes, we're fine. Our little neighborhood was built in two phases, back in 2005. We're in the first one, which is on the same electric leg as a 24 hour Kroger and a Walmart Supercenter. Those have been deemed "essential services", probably because of food in fridges and freezers. So we have had uninterrupted power. All of our 3 sons live within a few miles. The oldest is on a schedule of 30 minutes of power with one hour of blackout. Middle is on rotating blackouts, youngest has had some blackouts but is now on full power. That might be due to someone critically ill in his neighborhood. Texas gets 10% of its power from wind. With the cold that's down to 2%. The rest comes mostly from plants fired by natural gas. However most people's homes are also built to use natural gas, and some of the gas pipelines have frozen, so they can't ramp up. We're keeping the thermostat low and lights off to minimize use, but it's very dire for a lot of people. So far 9 have died, mostly from carbon monoxide as they are trying to get heat in their homes. We've got food, LOTS of quilts, and enough food for at least a week. It hasn't been this cold in Texas in more than 70 years and there were no wind farms then and a lot less people. Once it's over there will likely be a lot of damage from frozen pipes.


Cheryl Paul
 

I’m glad that your family is doing OK, Jim and Diane. We are prepared for the cold here as we get WINTER every year in Saskatchewan. Only today and it is -19 C (-2.2F) and our furnace QUIT. I was feeling chilly as we were playing a board game with our grandson. Jim went down to check the furnace and realized it hadn’t started when I increase the temperature a few degrees above 20C. Our son had problems with his furnace so borrowed our space heaters that we use for the garage and a shed. We’ll have to get them back from him so we don’t freeze over night. We don’t want to pay overtime charges to call a repair man at night if we don’t absolutely need to. So you see, we can’t win them all.

Hope everyone’s weather changes for the better.

Cheryl - Saskatoon