hoop sizes


Liz
 

I hope this hasn't been asked before, but what are the hoops available for the 12000. I am doing a 71/2 x 71/2 inch quilt design and find I am wasteing a lot of material using the 230x230 hoop. thanks Liz


redrocks55
 

Liz,
Complain to Janome, if enough of us complain to them maybe they will come up with smaller hoops. It's rediculous to have a 4" differance in hoop sizes.

Marcia

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Liz" <dse7sew@...> wrote:

I hope this hasn't been asked before, but what are the hoops available for the 12000. I am doing a 71/2 x 71/2 inch quilt design and find I am wasteing a lot of material using the 230x230 hoop. thanks Liz


Vikki Youngmeyer
 

Look at the revenue that Janome is losing by not making smaller hoops! We have the big hoops, but many of us have upgraded to this machine from machines where a 5 x 7 hoop was considered large!

 

Whoever engineered the 12000 solved a lot of issues with the sewing side of the machine, but didn’t think out the embroidery issues. Janome has the hoops out there. There just needs to be a bit of “manufacturing” to handle additional hoops and an update to the software to recognize the hoop size. That shouldn’t be all that difficult to fix. Whether it’s worth Janome’s while to do so is another issue!

 

Vikki

Houston, TX

 

From: janome12000@... [mailto:janome12000@...] On Behalf Of red5533us
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 9:48 PM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] Re: hoop sizes

 

 


Liz,
Complain to Janome, if enough of us complain to them maybe they will come up with smaller hoops. It's rediculous to have a 4" differance in hoop sizes.

Marcia
--- In janome12000@..., "Liz" wrote:
>
> I hope this hasn't been asked before, but what are the hoops available for the 12000. I am doing a 71/2 x 71/2 inch quilt design and find I am wasteing a lot of material using the 230x230 hoop. thanks Liz
>


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Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

It's not possible to put in software to recognize the size of the attached hoop, because they did not build any kind of sensor into the attaching mechanism. Given that Brother has had this for years, I'm really surprised this feature didn't make it.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Vikki Youngmeyer" <vikkiy@...> wrote:

Look at the revenue that Janome is losing by not making smaller hoops! We
have the big hoops, but many of us have upgraded to this machine from
machines where a 5 x 7 hoop was considered large!



Whoever engineered the 12000 solved a lot of issues with the sewing side of
the machine, but didn't think out the embroidery issues. Janome has the
hoops out there. There just needs to be a bit of "manufacturing" to handle
additional hoops and an update to the software to recognize the hoop size.
That shouldn't be all that difficult to fix. Whether it's worth Janome's
while to do so is another issue!



Vikki

Houston, TX


Cheryl Paul
 

Hi Jim,

To recognize the size of the attached hoop, is it possible to do an update/upgrade to get this feature? Or would the sensor need to be in the robotic arm, therefore requiring a new expensive part. Stabilizer is expensive so I understand where folks are coming from with the hoop sizes. Even the small square hoop uses a lot of stabilizer because of its shape - nice stable hoop though. Maybe we have to work on getting the prices down on stabilizer - now that might be a trick to try.

Cheryl - Saskatoon

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@...> wrote:

It's not possible to put in software to recognize the size of the attached hoop, because they did not build any kind of sensor into the attaching mechanism. Given that Brother has had this for years, I'm really surprised this feature didn't make it.


Vikki Youngmeyer
 

Regarding stabilizer, I’ve been stitching pieces together to make them large enough to be hooped by the larger hoops. Currently the only stabilizer I have are rolls that are 12” wide by so many yards. I needed 14-15” wide stabilizer to fit in the larger hoops. What I did was to cut two lengths of stabilizer long enough to fit into the hoop, then use my rotary cutter to make a series of long strips out of one of the pieces. I then stitched a long strip to the long side of the first piece – overlapping the seams by ¼”. The seam is close enough to the edge of the hoop that it doesn’t get in the way of the design. This makes the piece long and wide enough to be hooped. When I hoop it, I make sure that the raw edges of the seams are on the underside of the hoop.

 

When I’m thru stitching the design, I remove the tear-away stabilizer carefully and usually have enough left to make a long strip which I save to attach to another piece.   I use the thread in the bobbins that the embroidery sensor says I don’t have enough of, as that sensor apparently isn’t activated in the sewing mode.

 

Vikki

Houston, TX


Liz
 

It's not only the stablizer , I sew pieces together also but one can't sew bits of fabric together. My other TOL machine has updates for new size hoops. I would not have bought the 12000 if I thought we were only limited to the original hoops.Liz

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Vikki Youngmeyer" <vikkiy@...> wrote:

Regarding stabilizer, I've been stitching pieces together to make them large
enough to be hooped by the larger hoops.


Vikki Youngmeyer
 

The Lunch Box quilt I’m working on had numerous blocks with embroidered/appliqué birds. There were three block sizes – 3 ½ x 6 ½, 6 ½ x 9 ½ and 3½  x 3 ½  inches respectively.

 

I cut two strips – width of fabric that were wide enough to be hooped by the small and medium sized hoops. I hooped the fabric so that the remaining strip was to the left of the machine. I then folded it up and pinned it so that it wouldn’t get caught on the machine. I was able to do multiple passes of the birds in one hooping by moving the design using the grid and outline feature. I was able to place the designs so that when I cut them apart I had sufficient fabric to maintain the block size without having a lot of extra fabric. Then I would unroll the fabric and start over with a second hooping and so on. I had a leftover piece from the larger hoop which I was able to use in the smaller hoop for another design. The leftover pieces from the smaller hoop were large enough to be cut down into the filler blocks required by this quilt.

 

It takes a bit of planning and some basic math skills. Out of 20+ designs, one is close on the seam allowance, so I may have to do that one over.  

 

Vikki

Houston, TX

 


janetpiekarski
 

I agree that we really should have a 5 X 7 hoop but I have to lauch because fairly recently, the battle cry was "The hoops are too SMALL!" Poor Janome, they made us bigger hoops and now we're crying for smaller ones. 4 X 4, really? Who would have thought we'd be asking for that!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Vikki Youngmeyer" <vikkiy@...> wrote:

The Lunch Box quilt I'm working on had numerous blocks with
embroidered/appliqué birds. There were three block sizes – 3 ½ x 6 ½, 6 ½ x
9 ½ and 3½ x 3 ½ inches respectively.



I cut two strips – width of fabric that were wide enough to be hooped by the
small and medium sized hoops. I hooped the fabric so that the remaining
strip was to the left of the machine. I then folded it up and pinned it so
that it wouldn't get caught on the machine. I was able to do multiple passes
of the birds in one hooping by moving the design using the grid and outline
feature. I was able to place the designs so that when I cut them apart I had
sufficient fabric to maintain the block size without having a lot of extra
fabric. Then I would unroll the fabric and start over with a second hooping
and so on. I had a leftover piece from the larger hoop which I was able to
use in the smaller hoop for another design. The leftover pieces from the
smaller hoop were large enough to be cut down into the filler blocks
required by this quilt.



It takes a bit of planning and some basic math skills. Out of 20+ designs,
one is close on the seam allowance, so I may have to do that one over.



Vikki

Houston, TX


Sherry Martin
 

The only reason I would like a 4x4 hoop is because I think the design of the 5x5 hoop wastes too much fabric. I had the 5x7 RE hoop for the 11000 which I used all the time, and I was looking forward to the 5x5 hoop because most of the time I didn't need the 5x7 hoop, the 5x5 would have been fine. Why couldn't they have made the design of the 5x5 hoop in a square instead of a circle? I now use as much stabilizer in it as I did in the 8x8 hoop I had for my 11000.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "janetpiekarski" <jsm1144@...> wrote:

I agree that we really should have a 5 X 7 hoop but I have to lauch because fairly recently, the battle cry was "The hoops are too SMALL!" Poor Janome, they made us bigger hoops and now we're crying for smaller ones. 4 X 4, really? Who would have thought we'd be asking for that!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Vikki Youngmeyer" <vikkiy@> wrote:

The Lunch Box quilt I'm working on had numerous blocks with
embroidered/appliqué birds. There were three block sizes – 3 ½ x 6 ½, 6 ½ x
9 ½ and 3½ x 3 ½ inches respectively.



I cut two strips – width of fabric that were wide enough to be hooped by the
small and medium sized hoops. I hooped the fabric so that the remaining
strip was to the left of the machine. I then folded it up and pinned it so
that it wouldn't get caught on the machine. I was able to do multiple passes
of the birds in one hooping by moving the design using the grid and outline
feature. I was able to place the designs so that when I cut them apart I had
sufficient fabric to maintain the block size without having a lot of extra
fabric. Then I would unroll the fabric and start over with a second hooping
and so on. I had a leftover piece from the larger hoop which I was able to
use in the smaller hoop for another design. The leftover pieces from the
smaller hoop were large enough to be cut down into the filler blocks
required by this quilt.



It takes a bit of planning and some basic math skills. Out of 20+ designs,
one is close on the seam allowance, so I may have to do that one over.



Vikki

Houston, TX