Edge to edge quilting on the 500e


Roberta K
 

I am working on a twin sized quilt. I understand how to set up the machine and how to hoop my quilt sandwich, but I cannot figure out how to keep the bulk of the quilt off the embroidery arm when I am working on the center of the quilt. I am aware that other brands of machines have the embroidery arm attached on the other end of the bed, so the weight of the quilt can be held up with a frame, but that is not the case with Janome’s design. 

If anyone has any experience with this issue, I would really appreciate some help.

Happy 4th of July everybody!

Thanks,
Roberta


Lyn Quine
 

My husband put battens on the ceiling and door handles, and I hang bungees from them with a clip on the bungee and string the quilt up off the bed and arm.  Bit DIY but it works.  If you have enough room at the back of the machine and floor space some people put an ironing board or clothes drier behind and drape the quilt over that.


On 3 Jul 2022, at 16:03, Roberta K via groups.io <robkon94@...> wrote:

I am working on a twin sized quilt. I understand how to set up the machine and how to hoop my quilt sandwich, but I cannot figure out how to keep the bulk of the quilt off the embroidery arm when I am working on the center of the quilt. I am aware that other brands of machines have the embroidery arm attached on the other end of the bed, so the weight of the quilt can be held up with a frame, but that is not the case with Janome’s design. 

If anyone has any experience with this issue, I would really appreciate some help.

Happy 4th of July everybody!

Thanks,
Roberta


Judy Jones
 

My sewing area is in front of two windows.  I have bungee cords and some very large clips (used to hold down tablecloths onto picnic tables) attached to the bungee cords.  The other ends of the bungee cords attach to the curtain rods over the windows.  I gather up wads of the quilt and clip them with the clips.  This takes the weight off the back while I am quilting.  I have to reposition the quilt periodically as I do the quilting around it.  I know there is some sort of free standing contraption that is sold, or perhaps you could hang some hooks from the ceiling to attach bungee cords to.
Maybe this will give you some ideas you could use for your area.
Happy Sewing,

Judy Jones

On Jul 3, 2022, at 9:03 AM, Roberta K via groups.io <robkon94@...> wrote:

I am working on a twin sized quilt. I understand how to set up the machine and how to hoop my quilt sandwich, but I cannot figure out how to keep the bulk of the quilt off the embroidery arm when I am working on the center of the quilt. I am aware that other brands of machines have the embroidery arm attached on the other end of the bed, so the weight of the quilt can be held up with a frame, but that is not the case with Janome’s design. 

If anyone has any experience with this issue, I would really appreciate some help.

Happy 4th of July everybody!

Thanks,
Roberta


Elizabeth Larson
 

I put my ironing board behind the machine table and lower it so the embroidery hoop is over it. The ironing board supports the weight of the quilt.


Cat - N
 

The first time I quilted ITH years ago, I needed something in a huge hurry that night, so I just pushed a dining room chair behind the machine, plus used the chair I was sitting in on the front side.  It worked just fine, and although I like the suspended systems that are available now, my dining room chairs store at the dining room table with very little setup and teardown.  LOL

- Cat (FL)


-----Original Message-----
From: Roberta K via groups.io <robkon94@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jul 2, 2022 4:11 pm
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] Edge to edge quilting on the 500e

I am working on a twin sized quilt. I understand how to set up the machine and how to hoop my quilt sandwich, but I cannot figure out how to keep the bulk of the quilt off the embroidery arm when I am working on the center of the quilt. I am aware that other brands of machines have the embroidery arm attached on the other end of the bed, so the weight of the quilt can be held up with a frame, but that is not the case with Janome’s design. 

If anyone has any experience with this issue, I would really appreciate some help.

Happy 4th of July everybody!

Thanks,
Roberta


Cynthia Dickerson
 


Kathy Strabel
 

You do need some way to lift the weight of the quilt off of the embroidery arm, and I have seen some great ideas here. I will add my 2 cents' worth, too.
My husband made a free-standing frame out of PVC pipe, in an inverted U-shape, with shorter pieces of PVC for horizontal "feet", so it can stand up. I added some straps made of 1" wide elastic on the upper crosspiece and attached ratcheting clamps to the elastic. (there is a lower crosspiece for stability also).  I gather a wad of my quilt sandwich into each clamp and also make sure that there is some of the sandwich bunched-up 
around the bed of the machine so that the quilt can move freely. Every so often,, un-clamp the quilt from the clamps, move the quilt to another position and then re-clamp. I would post a picture, but my clamping frame is still packed away due to a recent move.   My machine was always placed about 12 inches away from a wall with windows, so that the excess quilt could fall down behind the machine. I had zero space to the left of my sewing table, but the space behind the machine was adequate. DIME makes a product called The Weightless Quilter, but it is pretty pricey compared to a DIY one made of PVC from a home improvement store. The DIME product also requires some floor space to the left of your machine. Good luck with finding a solution that works for you!
Kathy S.

--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel