Topics

Bobbin Thread Strength

Ceil J
 

After reading many posts saying that the yellow dot bobbin case should be used unless using Janome bobbins for embroidery, I have some questions.
I have never been able to get a good result with that case no matter what bobbin thread I'm using.  I have 60 wt thread sold by my dealer and some from Fil-Tec, I have Janome 100 wt, something that claims to be Janome 120 wt, Bottom Line, and Janome pre-wound.  My tension seems to go from perfect to not good even when working with the same combination of bobbin and top thread so I will address that with my dealer at checkup time.
But what I did notice is that much of the bobbin thread is fairly easy to break, especially, no wonder, the 120 wt.  I'm wondering if that will hold up over time.  Also, the Bottom Line will not break at all.  These bobbins are not "old" (to me) and I'm not sure if I should be concerned.  When I first put in the 120 wt everything worked very well with excellent results on the back and front but then my top tension seemed too tight and the thread didn't pull nicely from the top.  Not sure why my tension does this sometime.  The reason I have so many different types/weights is that I keep thinking that I'm not using the perfect bobbin but I can get good results and then it changes again.  And the yellow dot case to way too tight for all of the bobbin threads I've used.  It may be defective.
But my real question is about the strength of the bobbin thread.  Is it okay to use thread that you can break by pulling it?  I've always been told that it's not good to use such thread but thinner thread does give nice results (for a while).

onlinesewing@...
 

It is not a requirement that you use the yellow dot bobbin case if you are not using Janome bobbin thread. I would recommend using only the normal, red dot case unless you see bobbin thread showing. If your yellow dot case is behaving erratically there is probably a ball of lint wedged under the tip of the tension spring at about the 8 o'clock position in the case as it sits in the machine. This can usually be removed with a very fine needle, gently teasing it out. If there is nothing caught in there you can reduce the tension in the yellow dot case by turning the slotted screw counter-clockwise. Adjust in very small increments until you get the results you are looking for.

As for the long term strength of bobbin thread, you can break very fine thread easily. However embroidery stitches are put in with relatively low tension, so there isn't much pull on the bobbin thread. If the embroidery is on something that will get a lot of handling, such as a towel or backpack, you may want to use something with a little more strength. However the real danger comes from overly-long satin stitches, which will almost always tear out with even moderate handling.

Ceil J
 

Thank you, Jim!  I'll start adjusting that yellow bobbin case.  Whenever I've tried to use it, it pulls so much top thread to the bottom that you can't even see any bobbin thread. 
As long as the very fine thread should hold up okay for normal decorative use, I'll keep using it as it's providing the best results when my machine cooperates.
Maybe I'll stitch out samples of each bobbin thread and see how they hold up in the wash. 


On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 5:07 PM, <onlinesewing@...> wrote:
It is not a requirement that you use the yellow dot bobbin case if you are not using Janome bobbin thread. I would recommend using only the normal, red dot case unless you see bobbin thread showing. If your yellow dot case is behaving erratically there is probably a ball of lint wedged under the tip of the tension spring at about the 8 o'clock position in the case as it sits in the machine. This can usually be removed with a very fine needle, gently teasing it out. If there is nothing caught in there you can reduce the tension in the yellow dot case by turning the slotted screw counter-clockwise. Adjust in very small increments until you get the results you are looking for.

As for the long term strength of bobbin thread, you can break very fine thread easily. However embroidery stitches are put in with relatively low tension, so there isn't much pull on the bobbin thread. If the embroidery is on something that will get a lot of handling, such as a towel or backpack, you may want to use something with a little more strength. However the real danger comes from overly-long satin stitches, which will almost always tear out with even moderate handling.