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A workable solution to magnets and sewing machines

Kathy Strabel
 

Hello everyone. Wow, the "magnets and sewing machines" thread had a LOT of activity and information. I have been looking for a solution and I think I landed on something that is workable, and does not require expensive hoop additions or accessories.   I thought a lot about how to overcome the problem of multiple hoopings to quilt   the blocks of a completed quilt, and without spending over $200 for a hoop accessory.  This is what I found works well with my Janome 500e machine:  Surprise! It is ordinary office-supply clips, the type that are usually black, with silver wire handles that can fold up or down ( see picture, coming soon).   Here is what you need: Your quilt sandwich, basted with safety pins, or held together with temporary spray adhesive (like 505)
                                                                              Your RE28 hoop that comes with the 500e machine (it's the largest hoop that came with mine)
                                                                               8 or 9 of those office-supply clips
                                                                               (Optional) washaway stabilizer   --I did not use any stabilizer.
Here is what you do:  Remove the inner hoop, and set it aside, You will not be using the inner hoop for this process.  Tighten the thumbscrew on the outer hoop to close it firmly.  Now lay your quilt over the outer hoop, centering your individual quilt block in the hoop.  Next, attach the clips to the quilt sandwich and the rim of the outer hoop, pushing the clips down before releasing the clip, so that the clip holds tight to the rim of the outer hoop, AND the straight edge of the clip holds the quilt sandwich down onto the table. Release the clip to hold everything in place. The silver wire clip handles should all be standing straight up. Mount the outer hoop to the embroidery arm. Check positioning of your individual quilt block to see that your design will stitch where you want it to. Use the machine's basting function to see exactly where the design will be.  Before starting to stitch the design, make sure that your presser foot lifter lever and your needle threader button are not going to interfere with your clips. If needed, you can temporarily remove the silver handles by squeezing  each handle inwards, AFTER you have placed the clips firmly in place.  You'll need to replace the handles to remove the clips after stitching.  I have practiced with a round design that is 6" X 6" and I had no interference with that.   Remember that I said I used no stabilizer. For practice, I used a quilt sandwich with ordinary quilt cotton and a felt-like batting, no stabilizer, no inner hoop, no magnets, and my sandwich was basted with 505  quilt basting spray.  The next problem is eliminating the drag while doing the embroidery and I have decided that some clamps attached to the ceiling will be the best bet. That project will have to wait a while, but for now, I am pleased with this remedy for smaller quilts. I can only say it has worked for me with the items I mentioned above. Your mileage may vary, as they say, if you are using a different machine or a different hoop.  You might want to give this a try, but be careful, I am not responsible if your experience is different than mine.  Happy stitching!!   Kathy Strabel   Camas WA     I will post a photo for reference soon.

Mary Jo Hirsch
 


Thank you Kathy   Looking forward you picture.  


On Sat, Feb 29, 2020 at 2:42 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Hello everyone. Wow, the "magnets and sewing machines" thread had a LOT of activity and information. I have been looking for a solution and I think I landed on something that is workable, and does not require expensive hoop additions or accessories.   I thought a lot about how to overcome the problem of multiple hoopings to quilt   the blocks of a completed quilt, and without spending over $200 for a hoop accessory.  This is what I found works well with my Janome 500e machine:  Surprise! It is ordinary office-supply clips, the type that are usually black, with silver wire handles that can fold up or down ( see picture, coming soon).   Here is what you need: Your quilt sandwich, basted with safety pins, or held together with temporary spray adhesive (like 505)
                                                                              Your RE28 hoop that comes with the 500e machine (it's the largest hoop that came with mine)
                                                                               8 or 9 of those office-supply clips
                                                                               (Optional) washaway stabilizer   --I did not use any stabilizer.
Here is what you do:  Remove the inner hoop, and set it aside, You will not be using the inner hoop for this process.  Tighten the thumbscrew on the outer hoop to close it firmly.  Now lay your quilt over the outer hoop, centering your individual quilt block in the hoop.  Next, attach the clips to the quilt sandwich and the rim of the outer hoop, pushing the clips down before releasing the clip, so that the clip holds tight to the rim of the outer hoop, AND the straight edge of the clip holds the quilt sandwich down onto the table. Release the clip to hold everything in place. The silver wire clip handles should all be standing straight up. Mount the outer hoop to the embroidery arm. Check positioning of your individual quilt block to see that your design will stitch where you want it to. Use the machine's basting function to see exactly where the design will be.  Before starting to stitch the design, make sure that your presser foot lifter lever and your needle threader button are not going to interfere with your clips. If needed, you can temporarily remove the silver handles by squeezing  each handle inwards, AFTER you have placed the clips firmly in place.  You'll need to replace the handles to remove the clips after stitching.  I have practiced with a round design that is 6" X 6" and I had no interference with that.   Remember that I said I used no stabilizer. For practice, I used a quilt sandwich with ordinary quilt cotton and a felt-like batting, no stabilizer, no inner hoop, no magnets, and my sandwich was basted with 505  quilt basting spray.  The next problem is eliminating the drag while doing the embroidery and I have decided that some clamps attached to the ceiling will be the best bet. That project will have to wait a while, but for now, I am pleased with this remedy for smaller quilts. I can only say it has worked for me with the items I mentioned above. Your mileage may vary, as they say, if you are using a different machine or a different hoop.  You might want to give this a try, but be careful, I am not responsible if your experience is different than mine.  Happy stitching!!   Kathy Strabel   Camas WA     I will post a photo for reference soon.

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Kathy Strabel
 

Mary---The picture is in the Photos section, in a folder called Kathy's Hoop. ( I could not figure out how to attach a photo while I was posting, so I made my own folder. (i since have figured out the photo thing). Plus, I forgot to add in the instructions that when your design is finished stitching, remove the clips, then slide your quilt square (or whatever else you are working on) so that it is centered in the hoop, add the clips as before, and stitch the next design....it's pretty obvious, but thought I should be thorough.   Happy stitching, Kathy Strabel   Camas WA


On Sat, Feb 29, 2020 at 1:45 PM Mary Jo Hirsch <mjhshmoo@...> wrote:

Thank you Kathy   Looking forward you picture.  

On Sat, Feb 29, 2020 at 2:42 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Hello everyone. Wow, the "magnets and sewing machines" thread had a LOT of activity and information. I have been looking for a solution and I think I landed on something that is workable, and does not require expensive hoop additions or accessories.   I thought a lot about how to overcome the problem of multiple hoopings to quilt   the blocks of a completed quilt, and without spending over $200 for a hoop accessory.  This is what I found works well with my Janome 500e machine:  Surprise! It is ordinary office-supply clips, the type that are usually black, with silver wire handles that can fold up or down ( see picture, coming soon).   Here is what you need: Your quilt sandwich, basted with safety pins, or held together with temporary spray adhesive (like 505)
                                                                              Your RE28 hoop that comes with the 500e machine (it's the largest hoop that came with mine)
                                                                               8 or 9 of those office-supply clips
                                                                               (Optional) washaway stabilizer   --I did not use any stabilizer.
Here is what you do:  Remove the inner hoop, and set it aside, You will not be using the inner hoop for this process.  Tighten the thumbscrew on the outer hoop to close it firmly.  Now lay your quilt over the outer hoop, centering your individual quilt block in the hoop.  Next, attach the clips to the quilt sandwich and the rim of the outer hoop, pushing the clips down before releasing the clip, so that the clip holds tight to the rim of the outer hoop, AND the straight edge of the clip holds the quilt sandwich down onto the table. Release the clip to hold everything in place. The silver wire clip handles should all be standing straight up. Mount the outer hoop to the embroidery arm. Check positioning of your individual quilt block to see that your design will stitch where you want it to. Use the machine's basting function to see exactly where the design will be.  Before starting to stitch the design, make sure that your presser foot lifter lever and your needle threader button are not going to interfere with your clips. If needed, you can temporarily remove the silver handles by squeezing  each handle inwards, AFTER you have placed the clips firmly in place.  You'll need to replace the handles to remove the clips after stitching.  I have practiced with a round design that is 6" X 6" and I had no interference with that.   Remember that I said I used no stabilizer. For practice, I used a quilt sandwich with ordinary quilt cotton and a felt-like batting, no stabilizer, no inner hoop, no magnets, and my sandwich was basted with 505  quilt basting spray.  The next problem is eliminating the drag while doing the embroidery and I have decided that some clamps attached to the ceiling will be the best bet. That project will have to wait a while, but for now, I am pleased with this remedy for smaller quilts. I can only say it has worked for me with the items I mentioned above. Your mileage may vary, as they say, if you are using a different machine or a different hoop.  You might want to give this a try, but be careful, I am not responsible if your experience is different than mine.  Happy stitching!!   Kathy Strabel   Camas WA     I will post a photo for reference soon.

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Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel




bhd02@...
 

Brilliant! Thanks for taking the time to be thorough.

Viola Tani
 

This is funny, I have been following this thread and was thinking of bulldog clips the other day and whether they could be used, I am not yet a quilter.  The type I was thinking is slightly different to the ones in your photo but I think both of them are called bulldog clips in the U.K.  Great minds think alike.

Viola

Lyn Quine
 

I looked at buying the Quilt Topper from DIME but it costs nearly as much in shipping as the item for the 15000. $49.99 for the topper and $40  shipping, so I went back to the drawing board and had a light bulb moment.  My husband has a 3D printer and some interesting tools.  I asked about the printer, but he suggested a sheet of Perspex which he can use to make a topper for me.  I’ve got some magnets from Amazon, I just have to wait now for him to get the Perspex and cut it........  it might take a while but I’ll remind him.

Mary Jo Hirsch
 

Canit be cut out like the inside hoop?

On Mon, Mar 2, 2020 at 5:35 PM Lyn Quine <lynquine@...> wrote:
I looked at buying the Quilt Topper from DIME but it costs nearly as much in shipping as the item for the 15000. $49.99 for the topper and $40  shipping, so I went back to the drawing board and had a light bulb moment.  My husband has a 3D printer and some interesting tools.  I asked about the printer, but he suggested a sheet of Perspex which he can use to make a topper for me.  I’ve got some magnets from Amazon, I just have to wait now for him to get the Perspex and cut it........  it might take a while but I’ll remind him.

 

 

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favymtz
 

Before this magnet conversation got too elongated, I tried the bulldog clips and didn't really like the way they functioned. The handles stick up too high and get in the way, ...
I felt like they were just too awkward, but others may like them though. I don't want to disparage or discourage anyone from trying them out.

My husband is a wonderful woodworker and made me a wood inner ring similar to the style that Jim & Diane are using. I have yet to find magnets that I like enough. I've tried a few that are available locally. I think what I'm going to end up with is making them. We're planning to model them after the SewTite magnets but make them wider. I have both sizes of the SewTite magnets and those magnets use the little 'super magnets' attached to plastic. The same super magnets are readily available in hardware stores, but it's getting the balance right of strong but not too strong. We're planning to use a strong adhesive to attach the magnets to wood.
Another issue is not having this gadget get too heavy, that would be a problem since we're already dealing with a heavy quilt.

If our version ends up working well I'll post pictures. Keeping fingers crossed!
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Favymtz

Kathy Strabel
 

Favymtz- (and others)--This is from Kathy S, I am the one that initiated the magnets/sewing machine thread and then posted about my "bulldog clip" method. I have found out that the bulldog clip method was not my original idea, someone else had posted (on some other website, I do not know where, and it was a few years ago..)_  Dang, I thought I had come up with a good solution, but I cannot take credit for that.   

You mentioned that the handles for the bulldog type clips were standing straight up and getting in the way.  There is an easy solution to that.  ONce you have placed your clips around the hoop, you can temporarily remove the fold-down handles by squeezing the handles inward until you can just pull them off. THen, just the "business end" of the clip remains attached to the hoop and quilt sandwich. When ready to remove the clips, simply re-squeeze the handles and place them back in position on the clip's body to use for removing he clip.   Then slide your fabric to the next place and repeat.   

By the way, I did order several sets of "super strong" magnets online--they were flat and round, and encased in a rubbery material, and were a Viking product, I believe.  So I assumed they were sewing-machine approved, not TOO strong.They were very strong--it was hard to even pry them apart. The idea I had was to use those magnets on the RE28  hoop's edges, which have a metal strip embedded along the top surface. But the metal strip is pretty narrow and there was not enough metal for the magnets to "bite" very firmly. They fell of almost immediately, so I sent those magnets back.  They stuck, but not very well at all.  

I have found that using the largest hoop gives enough room so that the handles do not interfere with the presser bar lifter, or the needle threader pull-down thingy.  This works well for the RE28 hoop on my 500e machine. I cannot attest to how it would work with any other hoop and/or machine.  I am enjoying seeing how other people are approaching this issue.    Kathy Strabel    Camas WA