A Suggestion for managing projects


Kathy Strabel
 

Greetings, sewing friends----

This suggestion might be of special interest to quilters, but it could apply to any type of sewing projects. 

I was making a quilt with a somewhat complicated layout, but I knew I did not have time to piece the entire top in one session. Nor do I have a space large enough to leave the pieces laid out in order for the next session.  I usually use my kitchen island for laying out and cutting, but could not leave my fabrics there for days, for obvious reasons.   So, I used a large vinyl tablecloth with a fuzzy backing, which is described as "flannel", but it is not flannel by any stretch of the imagination.  I laid out my rows and columns to be pieced on the fuzzy side of the tablecloth, then pinned and sewed a couple of the columns before having to stop my project. The un-pinned, un-sewn pieces remained on the tablecloth, which I carefully folded into a manageable  size to place in my project basket. When I had the time to continue pinning and sewing, my pieces were already laid out in order, and all I had to do was to carefully unfold the tablecloth and work on my project. No wrinkles, all the pieces stayed put in the folded tablecloth.  You can get these tablecloths for just a few dollars at big box stores, or Goodwill, etc... and also you can use them as design "boards" if you attach to a wall with those removeable 3M hooks.  I stick a few of those hooks on the wall, and attach small Bulldog clips to the top edge of the tablecloth and hook the clips into the 3M hooks.  Your pieces will stick to the fuzzy side. A great, temporary design board.    Happy sewing to all!   Kathy Strabel    Camas WA


Cat - N
 

Kathy, I seriously thought you were going to say you rolled the tablecloth up with your pieces inside…lol…but folding it to fit a storage place is maybe better. I did a similar thing when I (a non-beginner) went to a beginner block of the month with a real beginner friend. I hated the thought of pressing the blocks only to have them wrinkle in transport, so I stacked them on several pieces of pre-used stabilizer that I had torn away the embroidery from, put a few more used sheets on top of the stack, rolled them up and put a tiny hair scunchies from a dollar store (I use them on Yorkie topknots…they cost about $2/300pc bag) on each end. They stayed perfect. But I like your idea for a encasing the layout in a table cloth for a larger quilt in process. Thank you. 

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 


Janet Wallis
 

Good idea. Thanks for sharing.


On Sun, Jun 20, 2021 at 4:42 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Greetings, sewing friends----

This suggestion might be of special interest to quilters, but it could apply to any type of sewing projects. 

I was making a quilt with a somewhat complicated layout, but I knew I did not have time to piece the entire top in one session. Nor do I have a space large enough to leave the pieces laid out in order for the next session.  I usually use my kitchen island for laying out and cutting, but could not leave my fabrics there for days, for obvious reasons.   So, I used a large vinyl tablecloth with a fuzzy backing, which is described as "flannel", but it is not flannel by any stretch of the imagination.  I laid out my rows and columns to be pieced on the fuzzy side of the tablecloth, then pinned and sewed a couple of the columns before having to stop my project. The un-pinned, un-sewn pieces remained on the tablecloth, which I carefully folded into a manageable  size to place in my project basket. When I had the time to continue pinning and sewing, my pieces were already laid out in order, and all I had to do was to carefully unfold the tablecloth and work on my project. No wrinkles, all the pieces stayed put in the folded tablecloth.  You can get these tablecloths for just a few dollars at big box stores, or Goodwill, etc... and also you can use them as design "boards" if you attach to a wall with those removeable 3M hooks.  I stick a few of those hooks on the wall, and attach small Bulldog clips to the top edge of the tablecloth and hook the clips into the 3M hooks.  Your pieces will stick to the fuzzy side. A great, temporary design board.    Happy sewing to all!   Kathy Strabel    Camas WA


ladybug35186
 

Thanks for your suggestions - I also took a piece of styrofoam (any size you want) and covered with flannel and placed on a wall to be used as a design wall.  Your idea would work much better since you can fold and put away (which you cannot do with foamboard). My design board may go away - I like your idea much better and wouldn't lose precious wall space.  Thanks again!!!

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Sun, Jun 20, 2021 10:45 am
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] A Suggestion for managing projects

Greetings, sewing friends----

This suggestion might be of special interest to quilters, but it could apply to any type of sewing projects. 

I was making a quilt with a somewhat complicated layout, but I knew I did not have time to piece the entire top in one session. Nor do I have a space large enough to leave the pieces laid out in order for the next session.  I usually use my kitchen island for laying out and cutting, but could not leave my fabrics there for days, for obvious reasons.   So, I used a large vinyl tablecloth with a fuzzy backing, which is described as "flannel", but it is not flannel by any stretch of the imagination.  I laid out my rows and columns to be pieced on the fuzzy side of the tablecloth, then pinned and sewed a couple of the columns before having to stop my project. The un-pinned, un-sewn pieces remained on the tablecloth, which I carefully folded into a manageable  size to place in my project basket. When I had the time to continue pinning and sewing, my pieces were already laid out in order, and all I had to do was to carefully unfold the tablecloth and work on my project. No wrinkles, all the pieces stayed put in the folded tablecloth.  You can get these tablecloths for just a few dollars at big box stores, or Goodwill, etc... and also you can use them as design "boards" if you attach to a wall with those removeable 3M hooks.  I stick a few of those hooks on the wall, and attach small Bulldog clips to the top edge of the tablecloth and hook the clips into the 3M hooks.  Your pieces will stick to the fuzzy side. A great, temporary design board.    Happy sewing to all!   Kathy Strabel    Camas WA


wlstarn@aol.com
 

I've done this quite a bit.  You can roll it up, and unroll a row at a time to sew the pieces together.  Also a handy way to take a quilt in progress to a retreat or workshop.fold one edge in do that the fabric pieces are not sticking to the flannel on their right sides.


Kathy Skagen
 

That's genius! 

On Sunday, June 20, 2021, 03:42:26 PM CDT, Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:


Greetings, sewing friends----

This suggestion might be of special interest to quilters, but it could apply to any type of sewing projects. 

I was making a quilt with a somewhat complicated layout, but I knew I did not have time to piece the entire top in one session. Nor do I have a space large enough to leave the pieces laid out in order for the next session.  I usually use my kitchen island for laying out and cutting, but could not leave my fabrics there for days, for obvious reasons.   So, I used a large vinyl tablecloth with a fuzzy backing, which is described as "flannel", but it is not flannel by any stretch of the imagination.  I laid out my rows and columns to be pieced on the fuzzy side of the tablecloth, then pinned and sewed a couple of the columns before having to stop my project. The un-pinned, un-sewn pieces remained on the tablecloth, which I carefully folded into a manageable  size to place in my project basket. When I had the time to continue pinning and sewing, my pieces were already laid out in order, and all I had to do was to carefully unfold the tablecloth and work on my project. No wrinkles, all the pieces stayed put in the folded tablecloth.  You can get these tablecloths for just a few dollars at big box stores, or Goodwill, etc... and also you can use them as design "boards" if you attach to a wall with those removeable 3M hooks.  I stick a few of those hooks on the wall, and attach small Bulldog clips to the top edge of the tablecloth and hook the clips into the 3M hooks.  Your pieces will stick to the fuzzy side. A great, temporary design board.    Happy sewing to all!   Kathy Strabel    Camas WA


Clsoares78@...
 

I used that type of fabric and put grommets in it and hang from my fabric cabinet when I need a design wall. It works great.


Kathy Strabel
 

Thank you all for the nice comments on my "flannel board/vinyl tablecloth" design board.  Happy sewing!!   Kathy Strabel  Camas WA