locked A question about thread


Jim Stutsman
 

I suspect that everyone reading this has opinions about thread. I'm not particularly interested in which brands you like, or which ones you avoid. I'd like to know what qualities you think are important in evaluating a particular brand of thread. Obviously strength is at, or near, the top of the list. Cost is probably also a consideration, especially these days. So the question is this: if you were evaluating a particular thread, what are the characteristics that would be important to you? Thanks to all who reply!


Estelle Torpy
 

I like to know how much fluff will build up in the bobbin area from the thread. 

Estelle


On Nov 19, 2022, at 9:24 AM, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

I suspect that everyone reading this has opinions about thread. I'm not particularly interested in which brands you like, or which ones you avoid. I'd like to know what qualities you think are important in evaluating a particular brand of thread. Obviously strength is at, or near, the top of the list. Cost is probably also a consideration, especially these days. So the question is this: if you were evaluating a particular thread, what are the characteristics that would be important to you? Thanks to all who reply!


favymtz
 

For embroidery threads, my opinion is largely based on the appearance I want on the project. Therefore, sheen level is important, I don't always like super shiny. In fact I'm currently working on a project for which I purchased a poly thread from a big box store that looks like cotton to get an heirloom appearance. (I'm pleasantly surprised as I rarely buy from big-box brands!)
Re: quality: I have found that consistency in the thread strand can differ. There are a few brands out there that I will never buy again, purely because what is called a 40 wt, is really more like a 60 wt. But if one knows that can be an issue just be prepared to use it accordingly.
Re quality, I also have a favorite brand that embroiders beautifully and is very inexpensive! The place where they saved $ is in the spool; sometimes they don't snap closed right and that can cause some feeding problems if the thread catches under the spool. Something to watch out for in bargain priced threads.
Re strength, I think most of the poly threads are consistently strong threads, for example more so than a rayon or cotton. I rarely purchase Rayon anymore in favor of Poly which comes in gazillions of colors, is colorfast and strong.
Re sewability, there is a brand that I love the appearance of, but it has never sewn well on my Janome machines. Floriani. The twist on the thread is what causes problems and it often splits right at the needle point. Is the twist too loose? Comes off the spool in the 'wrong' direction? I don't know, but I always am carefully watching my machine when I use it!
I know you didn't want "Brand" information, but this is a very real and important factor in my thread usage!

~Favymtz

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Favymtz


Ceil J
 

Thread.
I would like a thread that, if cotton, is low-lint and strong.  (tug on it to see if it breaks) 
If poly has a nice sheen, many color choices in the collection, and does not unravel at the ends.  While I loved the sheen of Florini, the threads on the cone I had kept separating and I found it annoying.  I love Robson-Anton as it seems to be wound the opposite of others and I just like their colors and how it sews, however I do not like storage of it or that the color tags fall off the bottom of the spools easily.
When I first started embroidering, my husband was tired of me saying that I didn't have the color I wanted so he (naively) suggested that I buy a line of thread.  My choice was Madeira because it was shiny enough (not as much as the Florini), had a lot of colors, but mostly because I could get it in special drawers that made storage fantastic.  I now do regret buying so much thread at once but the storage system was what made my decision for me. It also helped that I was making a few small items for my daughter's business and was able to purchase the thread at a much lower price.  When I need a large cone of white or black poly, I do buy it from Robson-Anton.  I have a large cone of Isacord poly but found it seems to be too thin when it stitches out. 
It's also important to buy what works.  duh.  I have lots of bobbins but the ones that seem to work the best in my machine for embroidery are the Janome prewound ones.  I just never seem to have an issue when I use them. 
For specialty threads I would only buy from Superior Threads (for invisible, wash away, etc.) as they work great but their other thread is just too expensive in my opinion. 
Sorry to include brand information but I'm not sure how to think about threads without thinking of brands.  I know there are other brands that would work great too.  I have others that I bought when sampling different brands but they're on a sort of peg system behind the door and often keep falling off. 
I think it's past time to stop!
Ceil


On Sat, Nov 19, 2022 at 11:24 AM Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
I suspect that everyone reading this has opinions about thread. I'm not particularly interested in which brands you like, or which ones you avoid. I'd like to know what qualities you think are important in evaluating a particular brand of thread. Obviously strength is at, or near, the top of the list. Cost is probably also a consideration, especially these days. So the question is this: if you were evaluating a particular thread, what are the characteristics that would be important to you? Thanks to all who reply!


wlstarn@aol.com
 

I use several different brands of thread.  I prefer about 40-50 weight cotton most of the time, and I'm not crazy about shiny thread on most of my art quilts.  Less lint is a definite factor, as is getting the right color. I suggest sticking with name brands, as most bargain thread ends up being no bargain!  I do like metallics, as accents, and have had luck using an empty quart jar on the floor to hold the thread.  The extra long pathway to the 6700's thread stand seems to get the kinks out.

For garments, I like a name brand poly, but not the cheap, all purpose thread by the biggest manufacturer, sold in big box stores.  Their cotton quilting thread is ok, but I had one of their variegated cotton threads bleed all over a white quilt back, from wet blocking the quilt.  Have tried several products to remove the pink and yellow bleed, to no avail.  If it's an important project, perhaps test a length of thread by sewing on a piece of white cotton fabric, wetting it well, and letting it dry. Better than having bleeding thread ruin something.


Cat - N
 

I am not brand loyal generally speaking, but I am specs and quality loyal. I am aware that many products are made by one company but branded for many others sometimes. I do look up manufacturers to see where the thread is made and by whom, and depending on that info, might buy the ‘generic’ and/or the ‘brand’ thread since it’s basically ‘the same thread’ from the same factory wearing multiple logos. Thread I like needs to not break…break…break during use/sewing or after, needs good color, consistent thickness, and hopefully not very linty.  I use Janome prewound bobbins (Robison-Anton bobbin thread is Janome’s bobbin thread choice) and I have had no issues with it on the bobbin, or since I also put leftovers on top sometimes, no issues there either, but that’s all of that brand I have. I have quite a few different brands but I have had as good a luck with non-brand threads as with brand threads, and I still sew at times, depending on color, with TG&Y polyester thread I bought in Copperas Cove, Texas between 1978 and 1980, and it’s marvelous thread.  LOL It’s been protected from air and UV all this time, but been well traveled in this country and Europe, so maybe that helped. I rarely use cotton thread…not since poly came out/became accessible in my tiny hometown as a girl. Cotton breaks more readily than poly in my experience, and might not hold color well or might bleed color. Cotton might be important if temperatures are issues but for what I do most of the time, poly is not an issue temperature wise. Specialty threads are a different matter to me and I evaluate them based on specifics that apply to them. 


- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 



blue_lak
 

It starts with the project for me. If piecing for a quilt, 100% mercerized, plied cotton, 50 wt. Mercerized thread is stronger and holds dye/color longer and more consistently. All those qualities also make the thread so versatile for EPP, machine applique, and hand stitching bindings. For actual quilting, it depends on the batting. If cotton batting and dense quilting, the same 50 wt thread, but a 40 wt if minimal stitching or I want the thread to stand out. If poly batting, then a plied poly thread, wt dependent on the density of the quilting. And yes, the obvious characteristics the thread has to have is consistent smoothness, minimal linting, and must be on cross-wound spools to use on any of my machines other than my featherweight.
Jan


Jim Stutsman
 

Thanks everyone for your input! I have enough information for now.