automatic thread cutter


Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Hello all,
Does anyone know if the automatic thread cutter can be turned off for a purchased design? I am stitching out some redline designs on white and the knots are very large and bulky, I'm afraid that they will show through the back of the completed design.
Thanks!
Kathy


favymtz
 

Yes you can turn it off! Just go to Settings/Embroidery/page through til you get to Thread Cutting and choose your settings that you want/make sure to say ok before exiting the screen 
Favymtz 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 4:23 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hello all,
Does anyone know if the automatic thread cutter can be turned off for a purchased design? I am stitching out some redline designs on white and the knots are very large and bulky, I'm afraid that they will show through the back of the completed design.
Thanks!
Kathy


--
Favymtz


Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Thanks, Favy!

On Monday, January 17, 2022, 05:36:16 PM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Yes you can turn it off! Just go to Settings/Embroidery/page through til you get to Thread Cutting and choose your settings that you want/make sure to say ok before exiting the screen 
Favymtz 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 4:23 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hello all,
Does anyone know if the automatic thread cutter can be turned off for a purchased design? I am stitching out some redline designs on white and the knots are very large and bulky, I'm afraid that they will show through the back of the completed design.
Thanks!
Kathy


--
Favymtz


favymtz
 

To reduce the blobs on the back You also might want to make sure and pull up the bobbin thread at the beginning of each color stop. Use the One Stitch function or do it manually. 
~f

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 5:07 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Thanks, Favy!

On Monday, January 17, 2022, 05:36:16 PM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Yes you can turn it off! Just go to Settings/Embroidery/page through til you get to Thread Cutting and choose your settings that you want/make sure to say ok before exiting the screen 
Favymtz 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 4:23 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hello all,
Does anyone know if the automatic thread cutter can be turned off for a purchased design? I am stitching out some redline designs on white and the knots are very large and bulky, I'm afraid that they will show through the back of the completed design.
Thanks!
Kathy


--
Favymtz


--
Favymtz


Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Hi Favy,
Would that be pulling the bobbin thread up to the top of the hoop? I do pull the bobbin thread up every time I thread the machine. But I'm getting big knotty blobs on the back of the design when the machine cuts the thread to go to another area of the design. The design is all one color so no color changes. 
Thanks,
Kathy

On Tuesday, January 18, 2022, 07:53:17 AM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


To reduce the blobs on the back You also might want to make sure and pull up the bobbin thread at the beginning of each color stop. Use the One Stitch function or do it manually. 
~f

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 5:07 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Thanks, Favy!

On Monday, January 17, 2022, 05:36:16 PM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Yes you can turn it off! Just go to Settings/Embroidery/page through til you get to Thread Cutting and choose your settings that you want/make sure to say ok before exiting the screen 
Favymtz 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 4:23 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hello all,
Does anyone know if the automatic thread cutter can be turned off for a purchased design? I am stitching out some redline designs on white and the knots are very large and bulky, I'm afraid that they will show through the back of the completed design.
Thanks!
Kathy


--
Favymtz


--
Favymtz


Pixey
 

I am not Favy, but I know exactly what stitch blob you are talking about.  This is why I usually turn off jump stitch cutting in settings and trim my jump stitches manually anytime the back will show.

Pixey

On Jan 18, 2022, at 1:41 PM, Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:


Hi Favy,
Would that be pulling the bobbin thread up to the top of the hoop? I do pull the bobbin thread up every time I thread the machine. But I'm getting big knotty blobs on the back of the design when the machine cuts the thread to go to another area of the design. The design is all one color so no color changes. 
Thanks,
Kathy

On Tuesday, January 18, 2022, 07:53:17 AM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


To reduce the blobs on the back You also might want to make sure and pull up the bobbin thread at the beginning of each color stop. Use the One Stitch function or do it manually. 
~f

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 5:07 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Thanks, Favy!

On Monday, January 17, 2022, 05:36:16 PM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Yes you can turn it off! Just go to Settings/Embroidery/page through til you get to Thread Cutting and choose your settings that you want/make sure to say ok before exiting the screen 
Favymtz 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 4:23 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hello all,
Does anyone know if the automatic thread cutter can be turned off for a purchased design? I am stitching out some redline designs on white and the knots are very large and bulky, I'm afraid that they will show through the back of the completed design.
Thanks!
Kathy


--
Favymtz


--
Favymtz


Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Thanks, Pixey. I have been doing that for almost 20 years on my MC 10001, so it won't be difficult to continue just cutting the jump stitches myself. 
I was concerned that something was wrong with my cutter so your response has eased that worry!
Kathy


On Jan 18, 2022, at 2:00 PM, Pixey via groups.io <pixeyam@...> wrote:

I am not Favy, but I know exactly what stitch blob you are talking about.  This is why I usually turn off jump stitch cutting in settings and trim my jump stitches manually anytime the back will show.

Pixey

On Jan 18, 2022, at 1:41 PM, Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:


Hi Favy,
Would that be pulling the bobbin thread up to the top of the hoop? I do pull the bobbin thread up every time I thread the machine. But I'm getting big knotty blobs on the back of the design when the machine cuts the thread to go to another area of the design. The design is all one color so no color changes. 
Thanks,
Kathy

On Tuesday, January 18, 2022, 07:53:17 AM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


To reduce the blobs on the back You also might want to make sure and pull up the bobbin thread at the beginning of each color stop. Use the One Stitch function or do it manually. 
~f

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 5:07 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Thanks, Favy!

On Monday, January 17, 2022, 05:36:16 PM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Yes you can turn it off! Just go to Settings/Embroidery/page through til you get to Thread Cutting and choose your settings that you want/make sure to say ok before exiting the screen 
Favymtz 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 4:23 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hello all,
Does anyone know if the automatic thread cutter can be turned off for a purchased design? I am stitching out some redline designs on white and the knots are very large and bulky, I'm afraid that they will show through the back of the completed design.
Thanks!
Kathy


--
Favymtz


--
Favymtz


favymtz
 

Yes, Kathy, that’s what I meant, pulling up the bobbin thread always means to the top of the fabric!
If you’re getting lot’s of jumps you may want to redigitize it using the Redwork tool in Hatch.
Favymtz 


On Tue, Jan 18, 2022 at 12:41 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hi Favy,
Would that be pulling the bobbin thread up to the top of the hoop? I do pull the bobbin thread up every time I thread the machine. But I'm getting big knotty blobs on the back of the design when the machine cuts the thread to go to another area of the design. The design is all one color so no color changes. 
Thanks,
Kathy

On Tuesday, January 18, 2022, 07:53:17 AM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


To reduce the blobs on the back You also might want to make sure and pull up the bobbin thread at the beginning of each color stop. Use the One Stitch function or do it manually. 
~f

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 5:07 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Thanks, Favy!

On Monday, January 17, 2022, 05:36:16 PM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Yes you can turn it off! Just go to Settings/Embroidery/page through til you get to Thread Cutting and choose your settings that you want/make sure to say ok before exiting the screen 
Favymtz 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 4:23 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hello all,
Does anyone know if the automatic thread cutter can be turned off for a purchased design? I am stitching out some redline designs on white and the knots are very large and bulky, I'm afraid that they will show through the back of the completed design.
Thanks!
Kathy


--
Favymtz


--
Favymtz


--
Favymtz


Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Good to know. So would that apply to all embroidery--every time I embroider, I should pull the bobbin thread up through the fabric? I was taught to pull the bobbin thread up like you do in sewing a garment. So this is very good to know. I am interested to see the difference.
Kathy

On Tuesday, January 18, 2022, 06:48:30 PM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Yes, Kathy, that’s what I meant, pulling up the bobbin thread always means to the top of the fabric!
If you’re getting lot’s of jumps you may want to redigitize it using the Redwork tool in Hatch.
Favymtz 


On Tue, Jan 18, 2022 at 12:41 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hi Favy,
Would that be pulling the bobbin thread up to the top of the hoop? I do pull the bobbin thread up every time I thread the machine. But I'm getting big knotty blobs on the back of the design when the machine cuts the thread to go to another area of the design. The design is all one color so no color changes. 
Thanks,
Kathy

On Tuesday, January 18, 2022, 07:53:17 AM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


To reduce the blobs on the back You also might want to make sure and pull up the bobbin thread at the beginning of each color stop. Use the One Stitch function or do it manually. 
~f

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 5:07 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Thanks, Favy!

On Monday, January 17, 2022, 05:36:16 PM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Yes you can turn it off! Just go to Settings/Embroidery/page through til you get to Thread Cutting and choose your settings that you want/make sure to say ok before exiting the screen 
Favymtz 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 4:23 PM Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:
Hello all,
Does anyone know if the automatic thread cutter can be turned off for a purchased design? I am stitching out some redline designs on white and the knots are very large and bulky, I'm afraid that they will show through the back of the completed design.
Thanks!
Kathy


--
Favymtz


--
Favymtz


--
Favymtz


Beth
 

It does not have to be done for all embroidery if you don’t want the knot on back you will have to do so. As a matter of habit, I do it ALL the time.


favymtz
 

It all depends on what I'm making if I pull the bobbin thread up. I mostly do pull it up, and as Beth said if the knot on the back will be something you don't want, then by all means pull it up!
In fact, most of the time I pull up the bobbin thread for everything when I sew as well, not just in embroidery.
The little knot *I also call it a goober* is formed because of the tiny amount of thread tail that the thread cutter leaves.
There are 3 ways I know of to eliminate it while sewing, or at least minimize the goober:
  • pull up the bobbin thread at the start of sewing=the best
  • put the thread under the presser foot off to the right
  • catch the thread in the thread holder (the front part of the thread cutter)

Favymtz


On Wed, Jan 19, 2022 at 4:15 AM Beth <beth_weigt@...> wrote:
It does not have to be done for all embroidery if you don’t want the knot on back you will have to do so. As a matter of habit, I do it ALL the time.


--
Favymtz


Ceil J
 

You can also use a leader/ender to stop those goobers.


On Wed, Jan 19, 2022 at 8:35 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
It all depends on what I'm making if I pull the bobbin thread up. I mostly do pull it up, and as Beth said if the knot on the back will be something you don't want, then by all means pull it up!
In fact, most of the time I pull up the bobbin thread for everything when I sew as well, not just in embroidery.
The little knot *I also call it a goober* is formed because of the tiny amount of thread tail that the thread cutter leaves.
There are 3 ways I know of to eliminate it while sewing, or at least minimize the goober:
  • pull up the bobbin thread at the start of sewing=the best
  • put the thread under the presser foot off to the right
  • catch the thread in the thread holder (the front part of the thread cutter)

Favymtz


On Wed, Jan 19, 2022 at 4:15 AM Beth <beth_weigt@...> wrote:
It does not have to be done for all embroidery if you don’t want the knot on back you will have to do so. As a matter of habit, I do it ALL the time.


--
Favymtz


Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

I am definitely going  to start doing that because I don't like the goober no matter what I'm sewing! Lol! I did see a video in which the lady pulled the thread up and attached it to the thread holder but she never said why. So that now makes sense.
Thank you for these tips!
Kathy

On Wednesday, January 19, 2022, 07:34:54 AM CST, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


It all depends on what I'm making if I pull the bobbin thread up. I mostly do pull it up, and as Beth said if the knot on the back will be something you don't want, then by all means pull it up!
In fact, most of the time I pull up the bobbin thread for everything when I sew as well, not just in embroidery.
The little knot *I also call it a goober* is formed because of the tiny amount of thread tail that the thread cutter leaves.
There are 3 ways I know of to eliminate it while sewing, or at least minimize the goober:
  • pull up the bobbin thread at the start of sewing=the best
  • put the thread under the presser foot off to the right
  • catch the thread in the thread holder (the front part of the thread cutter)

Favymtz


On Wed, Jan 19, 2022 at 4:15 AM Beth <beth_weigt@...> wrote:
It does not have to be done for all embroidery if you don’t want the knot on back you will have to do so. As a matter of habit, I do it ALL the time.


--
Favymtz


Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Hi Ceil,
What is that and how does it work?
Kathy

On Wednesday, January 19, 2022, 10:11:41 AM CST, Ceil J <cjancola@...> wrote:


You can also use a leader/ender to stop those goobers.

On Wed, Jan 19, 2022 at 8:35 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
It all depends on what I'm making if I pull the bobbin thread up. I mostly do pull it up, and as Beth said if the knot on the back will be something you don't want, then by all means pull it up!
In fact, most of the time I pull up the bobbin thread for everything when I sew as well, not just in embroidery.
The little knot *I also call it a goober* is formed because of the tiny amount of thread tail that the thread cutter leaves.
There are 3 ways I know of to eliminate it while sewing, or at least minimize the goober:
  • pull up the bobbin thread at the start of sewing=the best
  • put the thread under the presser foot off to the right
  • catch the thread in the thread holder (the front part of the thread cutter)

Favymtz


On Wed, Jan 19, 2022 at 4:15 AM Beth <beth_weigt@...> wrote:
It does not have to be done for all embroidery if you don’t want the knot on back you will have to do so. As a matter of habit, I do it ALL the time.


--
Favymtz


Ceil J
 

Kathy,
Leaders are small pieces of fabric that you put under you needle to begin to sew and then you sew off (leaving a few stitches in between) onto your project.  It's very useful to use to begin and end chain piecing.  You then end your project with another small bit (or the same one snipped from the beginning).  There is a well-known quilter named Bonnie Hunter (Quiltville) who may have coined this phrase but the technique has been used for years.  She makes many quilts this way using, for example, 2.5 inch blocks right sides together as her leaders and enders and ending up with "bonus blocks" that she can later sew into a quilt.
I use very small scraps to do this when possible as I don't have to deal with those messes at the beginning or the end. 
Ceil


Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Thank you Ceil. That's a really good idea! I think I could learn a lot from you quilters.
:-)
Kathy

On Wednesday, January 19, 2022, 03:04:56 PM CST, Ceil J <cjancola@...> wrote:


Kathy,
Leaders are small pieces of fabric that you put under you needle to begin to sew and then you sew off (leaving a few stitches in between) onto your project.  It's very useful to use to begin and end chain piecing.  You then end your project with another small bit (or the same one snipped from the beginning).  There is a well-known quilter named Bonnie Hunter (Quiltville) who may have coined this phrase but the technique has been used for years.  She makes many quilts this way using, for example, 2.5 inch blocks right sides together as her leaders and enders and ending up with "bonus blocks" that she can later sew into a quilt.
I use very small scraps to do this when possible as I don't have to deal with those messes at the beginning or the end. 
Ceil


Fiona Williams
 

Stupid question likely but when you use leaders how do you lock your stitches at the beginning and end of each block or is this not required when sewing the blocks?

Fiona


On Jan 19, 2022, at 4:27 PM, Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:


Thank you Ceil. That's a really good idea! I think I could learn a lot from you quilters.
:-)
Kathy

On Wednesday, January 19, 2022, 03:04:56 PM CST, Ceil J <cjancola@...> wrote:


Kathy,
Leaders are small pieces of fabric that you put under you needle to begin to sew and then you sew off (leaving a few stitches in between) onto your project.  It's very useful to use to begin and end chain piecing.  You then end your project with another small bit (or the same one snipped from the beginning).  There is a well-known quilter named Bonnie Hunter (Quiltville) who may have coined this phrase but the technique has been used for years.  She makes many quilts this way using, for example, 2.5 inch blocks right sides together as her leaders and enders and ending up with "bonus blocks" that she can later sew into a quilt.
I use very small scraps to do this when possible as I don't have to deal with those messes at the beginning or the end. 
Ceil


favymtz
 

Generally when piecing quilt blocks you don't backstitch/lock the stitches at the beginning & end.
The reason is that the seams will be crossed, and secured when the pieces are sewn to other pieces.
The only time that they are locked is when inserting blocks like Y Seams, diamonds, or other odd angles.
Favymtz

On Thu, Jan 20, 2022 at 4:43 AM Fiona Williams via groups.io <f.taylorwilliams=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Stupid question likely but when you use leaders how do you lock your stitches at the beginning and end of each block or is this not required when sewing the blocks?

Fiona


On Jan 19, 2022, at 4:27 PM, Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:


Thank you Ceil. That's a really good idea! I think I could learn a lot from you quilters.
:-)
Kathy

On Wednesday, January 19, 2022, 03:04:56 PM CST, Ceil J <cjancola@...> wrote:


Kathy,
Leaders are small pieces of fabric that you put under you needle to begin to sew and then you sew off (leaving a few stitches in between) onto your project.  It's very useful to use to begin and end chain piecing.  You then end your project with another small bit (or the same one snipped from the beginning).  There is a well-known quilter named Bonnie Hunter (Quiltville) who may have coined this phrase but the technique has been used for years.  She makes many quilts this way using, for example, 2.5 inch blocks right sides together as her leaders and enders and ending up with "bonus blocks" that she can later sew into a quilt.
I use very small scraps to do this when possible as I don't have to deal with those messes at the beginning or the end. 
Ceil


--
Favymtz


Fiona Williams
 

Thank you
Fiona


On Jan 20, 2022, at 9:31 AM, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:


Generally when piecing quilt blocks you don't backstitch/lock the stitches at the beginning & end.
The reason is that the seams will be crossed, and secured when the pieces are sewn to other pieces.
The only time that they are locked is when inserting blocks like Y Seams, diamonds, or other odd angles.
Favymtz

On Thu, Jan 20, 2022 at 4:43 AM Fiona Williams via groups.io <f.taylorwilliams=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Stupid question likely but when you use leaders how do you lock your stitches at the beginning and end of each block or is this not required when sewing the blocks?

Fiona


On Jan 19, 2022, at 4:27 PM, Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:


Thank you Ceil. That's a really good idea! I think I could learn a lot from you quilters.
:-)
Kathy

On Wednesday, January 19, 2022, 03:04:56 PM CST, Ceil J <cjancola@...> wrote:


Kathy,
Leaders are small pieces of fabric that you put under you needle to begin to sew and then you sew off (leaving a few stitches in between) onto your project.  It's very useful to use to begin and end chain piecing.  You then end your project with another small bit (or the same one snipped from the beginning).  There is a well-known quilter named Bonnie Hunter (Quiltville) who may have coined this phrase but the technique has been used for years.  She makes many quilts this way using, for example, 2.5 inch blocks right sides together as her leaders and enders and ending up with "bonus blocks" that she can later sew into a quilt.
I use very small scraps to do this when possible as I don't have to deal with those messes at the beginning or the end. 
Ceil


--
Favymtz


Kathy Strabel
 

Hello Janomie Homies----
I feel I need to make a comment about the use of "leaders".  In the "old days", we never had to use leaders to keep our fabric from being eaten by the needle plate's hole. You just placed the fabric under the foot and sewed--either with a few backstitches, or without. You could stitch the whole seam, arrive at the end of the seam, activate your reverse stitch and be done without getting a thread "blob" on the back or your fabric stuck in the needleplate. Newer machines seem to be incapable  of doing this,no matter if the machine is the TOL model or lower on the price spectrum.  This is soooooooo frustrating!!!   Also, when I see people posting and asking how to eliminate the fabric being pushed down into the needleplate, the answer is frequently to use the straight stitch plate. Seems logical, except if you are using a zigzag or lightning stitch. You cannot use the straight stitch plate with those stitches.  I frequently sew on poly/Lycra performance fabrics with a lightning stitch. In order to NOT get the fabric swallowed by the needle plate, I have to start my sewing 1/2" in from the edge and then stop it 1/2" from the end. Then turn the fabric 180 degrees, and sew the open 1/2" from its beginning  to the very edge of the fabric. Usually this works, but sometimes it does still get swallowed.   Can't the design engineers figure out how to eliminate this annoying problem??!! Since older machines did not have the problem, why are our "new, improved" models shackled with this bothersome glitch?        My sewing rant for the day, directed at all readers, not specifically Favymtz.  Thank you----and Happy Sewing To All
Kathy Strabel   Camas WA