S9 bobbin winding


Toni Valenstein
 

I'm using my prewound L bobbin thread to load onto my empty S9 bobbins.  It loads in a cone shape.  About half the thread on the bottom and gradually increases to load the top part until the auto stop.  This causes some problems while sewing.  It sometimes unseats the bobbin and breaks the thread.


Take a look at page 14 in the manual, third picture from the top. The area labeled with a circled number 3 is what controls the way the thread winds. There is a small spring in there that the thread should go under when you thread for winding. As instruction 2 in the square says, you need to pull the thread firmly through that area. Some new owners are fearful of breaking something, so they are very gentle in threading. If the thread fails to go under the spring it will wind up winding in a cone as you are seeing.


If that's not the problem you will notice that there is a screw in that area (circled 3). That screw raises and lowers a guide that keeps the thread at the correct height for proper winding. You need to have the bobbin actively winding to adjust it, turning either clockwise or counterclockwise. Turn no more than a quarter turn in either direction and observe what the thread is doing. If it gets worse, change direction. If it gets better keep turning in SMALL increments until it's correct. If nothing changes you'll need to see your dealer. She can take the top off and remove the cover for that area and make the needed adjustments.


Side note - I once had a 10000 customer whose husband attempted to remove the top cover by removing that screw. The head of the screw is larger than the access hole, so he scarred the top cover a bit before realizing it wouldn't come out. On the other side of the cover parts got dropped into the machine. It wasn't pretty! That's why you only turn in small amounts and NEVER tighten all the way down.


Maria Morrow <mariamorrowquilter@...>
 

I have used my thumb and first finger to "help" steer the thread up top when this has happened on machines I have used.  Just a little help to fill evenly and it goes back to a good pattern. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 13, 2017, at 6:38 AM, tenquilt@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

I'm using my prewound L bobbin thread to load onto my empty S9 bobbins.  It loads in a cone shape.  About half the thread on the bottom and gradually increases to load the top part until the auto stop.  This causes some problems while sewing.  It sometimes unseats the bobbin and breaks the thread.


Take a look at page 14 in the manual, third picture from the top. The area labeled with a circled number 3 is what controls the way the thread winds. There is a small spring in there that the thread should go under when you thread for winding. As instruction 2 in the square says, you need to pull the thread firmly through that area. Some new owners are fearful of breaking something, so they are very gentle in threading. If the thread fails to go under the spring it will wind up winding in a cone as you are seeing.


If that's not the problem you will notice that there is a screw in that area (circled 3). That screw raises and lowers a guide that keeps the thread at the correct height for proper winding. You need to have the bobbin actively winding to adjust it, turning either clockwise or counterclockwise. Turn no more than a quarter turn in either direction and observe what the thread is doing. If it gets worse, change direction. If it gets better keep turning in SMALL increments until it's correct. If nothing changes you'll need to see your dealer. She can take the top off and remove the cover for that area and make the needed adjustments.


Side note - I once had a 10000 customer whose husband attempted to remove the top cover by removing that screw. The head of the screw is larger than the access hole, so he scarred the top cover a bit before realizing it wouldn't come out. On the other side of the cover parts got dropped into the machine. It wasn't pretty! That's why you only turn in small amounts and NEVER tighten all the way down.


Sue Raabe <susies.stitches@...>
 

Is the S9 a good alternative to the 15000 for classes?  I was considering the 500e, butit's pretty heavy.  As soon as I can coordinate with my dealer, I plan to trade my 12000 for something!  I had a sale all lined up, and she decided she wanted the 7700.  I remember the comments on this group, but was so annoyed at being jerked around, I didn't even respond.  The mean streak in me hopes she hates it!  I had already decided to trade it, but impulsively reduced the price first, and got an immediate response.  Ing cash, and I would have, even though I hadn't planned on using PayPal.  At this point, I just want to be done, and the only decision is what to ge in its place.  I can use the 3160 for quilting, and just need something lighter for embroidery, even if it's a combo.  Any suggestions?  My funds are not unlimited!  Thanks. Sue Raabe susies.stitches@...


Liz Borgman
 

The s9 is a good machine and has a lot of things the high end machine has with out the weight. Good luck deciding 

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 14, 2017, at 4:05 PM, Sue Raabe susies.stitches@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Is the S9 a good alternative to the 15000 for classes?  I was considering the 500e, butit's pretty heavy.  As soon as I can coordinate with my dealer, I plan to trade my 12000 for something!  I had a sale all lined up, and she decided she wanted the 7700.  I remember the comments on this group, but was so annoyed at being jerked around, I didn't even respond.  The mean streak in me hopes she hates it!  I had already decided to trade it, but impulsively reduced the price first, and got an immediate response.  Ing cash, and I would have, even though I hadn't planned on using PayPal.  At this point, I just want to be done, and the only decision is what to ge in its place.  I can use the 3160 for quilting, and just need something lighter for embroidery, even if it's a combo.  Any suggestions?  My funds are not unlimited!  Thanks. Sue Raabe susies.stitches@...


Cheryl Paul
 

Sue,


Three years ago, I decided that I didn’t use my 12000 very much after I purchased the 15000. I’m lucky in that I have 2 Janome Dealers - one 10 -15 minutes from me and one just over an hour. The one further away and in a very small country city, Humboldt, population of less than 10,000, has a wonderful sewing conference every year. At the Saskatchewan Stitches Conference there are many things happening, quilting, sewing, knitting, spinning wool, and much more PLUS our Janome Educator from Vancouver comes and teaches and does her sales pitch for about 4 days of the 10. We love her as she is a very inspirational person. Anyway back to the story, I decided to approach Wendy (over of Haus of Stitches) to sharpen her pencil and come up with an offer for me to trade my 12000 for a smaller embroidery/sewing combo machine. A few weeks before the 2015 conference she called me and said that she would do an even trade, including taxes for the Elna 360. I was a bit disappointed as I though that my 12000 would be worth more than $2,800, but I checked with Liz in Vancouver and she said that was a fair price, so I grabbed it. In the mean time a very good friend decided she wanted a second 12000 for her sewing room and offered me the same money so I didn’t have to haul it out to Humboldt, as she would pick it up - she missed a FREE cleaning by doing that but … I got the Elna and I loved it BUT it didn’t have the auto foot lift and a few other bells and whistles that I liked, so 17 months later in September of 2016, I took my delivery of the Skyline S9 and love that little machine. That trade was probably more expensive as I had to put out more money. So when you decide make the BEST choice you can afford and even eat brown beans for a while if you really like one particular machine that isn’t really out of line in price but just a bit more than what you think you could “settle” for. I didn’t have the S9 option when I did my trade, but I could have had the 500e but knew I would be very unhappy if I went somewhere to embroider and discovered that I also needed to sew - the money isn’t a whole lot more to have both functions. However, the S9 does not sew designs quite as large as the 500e - I largest hoop is 170 X 200 and there is a 140 X 140 and a smaller one at 100 X 40. I use larger hoops, but most of what I do will fit into the 170 X 200 and especially for class purposes.


I just have this word of caution - your 12000 will NOT go up in price for a trade, so think about that when you are making a decision.


Cheryl - Saskatoon


Toni Valenstein
 

I'm returning to an old conversation, but the directions given on Pg. 14 (as recommended) only deals with the bobbin in the bobbin case, not winding the bobbin.  Is the only fix directing it with my my fingers?


B Diane Landon <publicaddress@...>
 

I too have the S9. How to wind your bobbin starts on page 13, continues on page 14 to bottom of page.  Page 15 tells you how to insert the bobbin in the case. 
B Diane Landon

Sent from my iPad

On Aug 1, 2017, at 8:25 AM, tenquilt@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

I'm returning to an old conversation, but the directions given on Pg. 14 (as recommended) only deals with the bobbin in the bobbin case, not winding the bobbin.  Is the only fix directing it with my my fingers?