Repairs on Janome machines


mjdutro@...
 

I am really totally amazed at the amount of you groupers that have problems with Janomes that actually have to go to the shop for repairs.

I have owned the 8000, 9000, 10000, and now the 12000.  Since 1993 I have sewed nearly every day with these machines and have yet to take one in for a repair.  I always clean my machine, oil that little wick, change needles frequently, praise her, thank her for the lovely job that she does.

My dealer is a two hour drive.  Used to be a 5 hour drive away.  I am grateful for the fine way that these machines are made and grateful for all the videos that are available for free as are all the written instructions on the web.

All of that said...I sewed with a Singer when I had four kids that all wore handmade clothes until junior high school, for 24 years.  I had no repairs with it either.  I was self taught from age 12.  I don't feel that I am bragging just astounded.  And thankful.

Martie in CA 


Anne Parker
 

Hi Martie

I have had a similar experience to you.  I have lots of machines - Vintage which I can sort myself, electronic one of which I have only had to take in one time when everything was completely frozen from being kept for years in a garage, and computerised one of which I had to take in for a blown condenser.  I've had the 15000 since Oct 2014 and so far - fingers crossed - I haven't had to take it anywhere!

I think though the very nature of a forum is that people join it to learn more, but also when they get problems, so it's sort of self selecting that the people that have problems are most of the people that post on the forum - so basically I think the membership is skewed as people who don't have issues have no pressing reason to join or post unless they want to use their experience to try and help others - which many people on this forum do and I for one am very grateful to them all! :0) - Thankyou everyone.

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"Live like someone left the gate open". Kimberly Burnham

 


ceilsews <no_reply@...>
 

Anne,
I totally agree!  I've never had a bit of trouble with any of my machines and no problem with the thread cutter V1 on the 15000.  Just like automobiles, even with the best ones there are problems here and there and certainly lemons in the pack.


favymtz
 

I'm sure that the discussions about "problems" on machines seems to be rather the bulk of the conversations here, but I believe it's in part because of the lack of help on the official Janome Forum. I'm grateful that we have such a great Yahoo Group for help when our members are in need of it. One thing I will say however, is that I would hope that people would read their Manuals! And re-read them, and re-read them... A great many of the questions that are brought up are simply answered in the machine Manuals! I teach classes for Janome Embroidery machines and I repeat this quite often to my students, "Read your manual. Get familiar with it alongside of your machine and you'll be amazed at the things you can make your machine do!"


Cheryl Paul
 

Martie,


I’ve owned a lot of Janome machines also - since my MC6000 purchased in 1984 - has a wonderful Pfaff 1222 before that. I wanted a new machine and NEW stitches. That 6000 machine lives with my middle daughter and is still going strong - I think. She probably only uses it to hem pants as she is an Accountant and works at least 8-10 hours a day, comes home puts 2 children to bed and I’m sure just to pooped out to sew. I then purchased a MC10000 in about 2003 and that machine caused me NO grief either and it did embroidery too - what a miracle that I could do more than just sew on a machine. I got the MC11000 in 2005 and it also sewed like a dream, but the bobbin case was an issue and I wasn’t alone, as many of my sewing buddies had the same issue. My 12000 was great, but my 15000 as the threader issue, but they all sew like there is no tomorrow. The needle threader thing is just more of an inconvenience than a problem. It is just that for the cost of the machine, I think all should work at least 99.9% of the time.


What I find difficult to understand is WHY folks are having the thread nests, and tension issues? I also don’t understand WHY dealers are nasty to their customers, by putting the blame back on that customer, when they certainly want to sell them another machine as some future point in time. They should treat them like royalty instead. Now you will occasionally run into a nasty customer too, but be kind and perhaps you can simmer the temper down. I really believe that there are ways to treat folks, from both sides that will keep everyone happy or at least satisfied that we are after all, creatures that God made.


Another thing, we seem to hear only of the problems folks have and not the good things. It’s when the machine isn’t working and we can’t sew or embroider. The folks with no problems are sewing/embroidering and creating nice things so have no need to post. Right!


Cheryl - Saskatoon


Lou Ann
 

I agree with Martie. My mom taught me to sew somewhere in the junior-high school years and I was making my own clothes all through high school. My Janome 12000 is awesome and I’ve had no problems with it.


cas <cas@...>
 

I’m noticing that more life-long sewers or those who have owned many machines are more tolerant of issues, or don’t see any issues. OR don’t cause any issues, lol.   More of us  newer sewers, or those of us new to buying expensive machines, are either intolerant and expect more, or we are still learning how a machine is supposed to act or how we are supposed to. 
 
The more I learn about the machine and about sewing in general the more I appreciate all the good qualities of Janome.  The more I learn about dealers the more I understand how important it is to find an honest one you can communicate with.
 
My needle threader works for a while and then has to go back for an adjustment or replacement.  Like Anne said, it’s the nature of the beast, there is only a tiny window for accuracy when trying to aim for such a small hole.  When my warranty runs out I won’t be paying to get it fixed.  I will just thread it manually.  I wish it had the older style of threader instead of the “fully automatic” one.
 
Mine seems to stop for no reason, not because I’ve changed a needle or the thread I’m using or changed the type of sewing I’m doing.  I will unthread it to fill a bobbin and then attempt to thread it again and it will “miss by a mile”.  This is even though I do the up/down several times, lock the machine, etc.  Sometimes turning the machine off and back on will fix it.  Sometimes I think the small processor might get overloaded and it can’t hold the settings necessary to aim correctly if it’s been on a long time.  Maybe I’m bumping the needle when I pull the thread out, who knows? I cut it at the spool and then lock the machine and then slowly pull the thread out the bottom, so I don’t think so.   I even put it back to straight stitch, default settings and push up and down a few times in case I have bumped it and try it again. 
 
Janome is not aware we are having any problems with the needle threader though unless we write them.  The repair techs do not report back to Janome if a machine is under warranty unless they are ordering parts.    I wrote Janome and they said there is not a new needle threader mechanism.  They said my tech had been in touch with them, and would install a new one if necessary but it will be the same part it always has been. 
 
Since I got it back it has jammed on several occasions, including when I first got it home, turned it on and tried to thread it with the same needle and thread in it that the repair tech used, the stuff that was still in it.  It gets stuck below the needle bar and I get the “raise the needle bar slowly” message.  It is very hard to get it un-stuck, I manually have to force it to move, but it threads wonderfully when it’s not jammed!  While it was jammed down there I noticed it was black and greasy on top of the white plastic, and the plastic was marred and scratched with little dents so it and was not a new replacement part like I was told it was.  I figured as much since I got it back in two days.  We all know it takes much longer than that for Janome to ship parts.  When we called the repair tech he said they come from Janome all dirty and greasy like that.  Funny, I never noticed it on my other three machines.  I was also told I need to use up/down before attempting to thread.  Silly me.  I should note, my machine is pristine, taken very good care of, and doesn’t have a scratch on it just in case you think I’m beating up the threader.
 
I really wish it was not an issue because I wanted an auto-threader to help save my neck and back pain.  It’s not really hard to manually thread a needle though, just push the thread above the hole and it will usually go into the groove above the eye and slide into the hole.  Keep a long tweezers handy to grab the back end and pull it through.   Just like on the serger.
 
Also, my machine says it has been on 533 hours and has 30 hrs. of sewing time on it.  That doesn’t seem correct to me as I turn it off when I’m not using it. 
 
Cas


Janet
 

I embroidered all weekend.  I did not have any thread breakage.   Yea!!!    Usually I do something wrong.   The only problem I had is my design app is not recognizing my machine  don't know why.  Just used a thumb drive instead.   I tried deleting the app and setting it up again no luck.  Will try next weekend to resolve.   

Janet


On Mar 21, 2016, at 3:42 PM, 'cas' cas@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

I’m noticing that more life-long sewers or those who have owned many machines are more tolerant of issues, or don’t see any issues. OR don’t cause any issues, lol.   More of us  newer sewers, or those of us new to buying expensive machines, are either intolerant and expect more, or we are still learning how a machine is supposed to act or how we are supposed to. 
 
The more I learn about the machine and about sewing in general the more I appreciate all the good qualities of Janome.  The more I learn about dealers the more I understand how important it is to find an honest one you can communicate with.
 
My needle threader works for a while and then has to go back for an adjustment or replacement.  Like Anne said, it’s the nature of the beast, there is only a tiny window for accuracy when trying to aim for such a small hole.  When my warranty runs out I won’t be paying to get it fixed.  I will just thread it manually.  I wish it had the older style of threader instead of the “fully automatic” one.
 
Mine seems to stop for no reason, not because I’ve changed a needle or the thread I’m using or changed the type of sewing I’m doing.  I will unthread it to fill a bobbin and then attempt to thread it again and it will “miss by a mile”.  This is even though I do the up/down several times, lock the machine, etc.  Sometimes turning the machine off and back on will fix it.  Sometimes I think the small processor might get overloaded and it can’t hold the settings necessary to aim correctly if it’s been on a long time.  Maybe I’m bumping the needle when I pull the thread out, who knows? I cut it at the spool and then lock the machine and then slowly pull the thread out the bottom, so I don’t think so.   I even put it back to straight stitch, default settings and push up and down a few times in case I have bumped it and try it again. 
 
Janome is not aware we are having any problems with the needle threader though unless we write them.  The repair techs do not report back to Janome if a machine is under warranty unless they are ordering parts.    I wrote Janome and they said there is not a new needle threader mechanism.  They said my tech had been in touch with them, and would install a new one if necessary but it will be the same part it always has been. 
 
Since I got it back it has jammed on several occasions, including when I first got it home, turned it on and tried to thread it with the same needle and thread in it that the repair tech used, the stuff that was still in it.  It gets stuck below the needle bar and I get the “raise the needle bar slowly” message.  It is very hard to get it un-stuck, I manually have to force it to move, but it threads wonderfully when it’s not jammed!  While it was jammed down there I noticed it was black and greasy on top of the white plastic, and the plastic was marred and scratched with little dents so it and was not a new replacement part like I was told it was.  I figured as much since I got it back in two days.  We all know it takes much longer than that for Janome to ship parts.  When we called the repair tech he said they come from Janome all dirty and greasy like that.  Funny, I never noticed it on my other three machines.  I was also told I need to use up/down before attempting to thread.  Silly me.  I should note, my machine is pristine, taken very good care of, and doesn’t have a scratch on it just in case you think I’m beating up the threader.
 
I really wish it was not an issue because I wanted an auto-threader to help save my neck and back pain.  It’s not really hard to manually thread a needle though, just push the thread above the hole and it will usually go into the groove above the eye and slide into the hole.  Keep a long tweezers handy to grab the back end and pull it through.   Just like on the serger.
 
Also, my machine says it has been on 533 hours and has 30 hrs. of sewing time on it.  That doesn’t seem correct to me as I turn it off when I’m not using it. 
 
Cas


Vikki Youngmeyer
 

You question the hours the machine is on versus the actual hours sewed. You say you turn it off when you aren’t using it. If you run out of bobbin thread, change a needle, stop the machine to reposition the quilt, trim an embroidery applique, go get a drink of water, answer the phone, or move away from the machine for whatever reason, do you turn it off each time?   That is time that the machine is on, but not stitching anything.

 

Vikki

Houston, TX

 


cas <cas@...>
 

Of course not, but that ratio seems really high to me.  I meant I turn it off when I’m not working on a sewing project.  I realize I spend a lot of time with my seam ripper, cutting fabric, pressing, etc. while I using the sewing machine.  I thought that was obvious, sorry you were confused. 
 
I meant I turn it off when I’m not using it compared to some people who say they turn it on in the morning and it stays on all day, in which case I would expect a lot of “on” hours like that.
Cas
 

Sent: Monday, March 21, 2016 2:30 PM
Subject: RE: [janome12000] Re: Repairs on Janome machines
 
 

You question the hours the machine is on versus the actual hours sewed. You say you turn it off when you aren’t using it. If you run out of bobbin thread, change a needle, stop the machine to reposition the quilt, trim an embroidery applique, go get a drink of water, answer the phone, or move away from the machine for whatever reason, do you turn it off each time?   That is time that the machine is on, but not stitching anything.

Vikki

Houston, TX


ceilsews <no_reply@...>
 

Cas,
I turn mine off when I'm not actually sewing too, probably similar to what you do.  All work on designs is done on my computer.  I'm at 156 and 34!
Ceil


bonnie waluda <waludabonnie@...>
 

How do you know how many hours are on your 12000?  I can't find the answer anywhere.

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 21, 2016, at 4:54 PM, 'cas' cas@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Of course not, but that ratio seems really high to me.  I meant I turn it off when I’m not working on a sewing project.  I realize I spend a lot of time with my seam ripper, cutting fabric, pressing, etc. while I using the sewing machine.  I thought that was obvious, sorry you were confused. 
 
I meant I turn it off when I’m not using it compared to some people who say they turn it on in the morning and it stays on all day, in which case I would expect a lot of “on” hours like that.
Cas
 
Sent: Monday, March 21, 2016 2:30 PM
Subject: RE: [janome12000] Re: Repairs on Janome machines
 
 

You question the hours the machine is on versus the actual hours sewed. You say you turn it off when you aren’t using it. If you run out of bobbin thread, change a needle, stop the machine to reposition the quilt, trim an embroidery applique, go get a drink of water, answer the phone, or move away from the machine for whatever reason, do you turn it off each time?   That is time that the machine is on, but not stitching anything.

Vikki

Houston, TX


Cheryl Paul
 

Hi Bonnie,


The 12000 does not have the “hours” available to you. That was a new feature on the 15000, and I wish they had not given us the 2 numbers as it only makes us paranoid. Obviously the sewing time (needle up/down) is the important one, but we all like to keep both levels down, like our mileage on our automobiles. Makes no sense, as the more hours on sewing, means that we done some work and make beautiful things.


Cheryl - Saskatoon


Estelle Torpy
 

I have had my machine since Dec 13, 2013. I have had no problems with this machine. On the 12000 I had before, I had one needle threader problem due to the operator using too small a needle and breaking it. I am fortunate to have had great service from my dealer but they are retiring at the end of this month and have sold the shop, boo whoo.
I am hoping for the best from the new owners who have two other shops in the next state.

Okay, you all got me curious. I turn it off my machine when not in use. I have 848 h 35 min on and 113 h 48 min needle up and down. Very interesting!

Happy Stitching, 

Estelle


On Mar 21, 2016, at 6:52 PM, ceilsews <no_reply@...> wrote:

Cas,
I turn mine off when I'm not actually sewing too, probably similar to what you do.  All work on designs is done on my computer.  I'm at 156 and 34! 
Ceil



cas <cas@...>
 

That seems like a more reasonable ratio.  Your ratio is similar to what my V1 was like before I traded it in. 
Cas
 

From: ceilsews
Sent: Monday, March 21, 2016 5:52 PM
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Re: Repairs on Janome machines
 
 

Cas,
I turn mine off when I'm not actually sewing too, probably similar to what you do.  All work on designs is done on my computer.  I'm at 156 and 34!
Ceil


cas <cas@...>
 

I have the 15000, on this machine I select the ? icon along the bottom edge of the screen.
Cas
 

Sent: Monday, March 21, 2016 6:17 PM
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Re: Repairs on Janome machines
 
 

How do you know how many hours are on your 12000?  I can't find the answer anywhere.

Sent from my iPad


Vikki Youngmeyer
 

The numbers really get skewed when a machine is a demo in a store!

 

Vikki Youngmeyer

Houston, TX

 

From: janome12000@... [mailto:janome12000@...]
Sent: Tuesday, March 22, 2016 9:56 AM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Repairs on Janome machines

 

 

Hi Bonnie,

The 12000 does not have the “hours” available to you. That was a new feature on the 15000, and I wish they had not given us the 2 numbers as it only makes us paranoid. Obviously the sewing time (needle up/down) is the important one, but we all like to keep both levels down, like our mileage on our automobiles. Makes no sense, as the more hours on sewing, means that we done some work and make beautiful things.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


cas <cas@...>
 

Estelle,
Do you spend a lot of time with your seam ripper like I do?  lol.  Apparently now more than ever.  Maybe because I’m learning new things.
Cas
 
 
 

I have had my machine since Dec 13, 2013. I have had no problems with this machine. On the 12000 I had before, I had one needle threader problem due to the operator using too small a needle and breaking it. I am fortunate to have had great service from my dealer but they are retiring at the end of this month and have sold the shop, boo whoo.

I am hoping for the best from the new owners who have two other shops in the next state.
 
Okay, you all got me curious. I turn it off my machine when not in use. I have 848 h 35 min on and 113 h 48 min needle up and down. Very interesting!
 
Happy Stitching,
 
Estelle
 
 

On Mar 21, 2016, at 6:52 PM, ceilsews <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

Cas,
I turn mine off when I'm not actually sewing too, probably similar to what you do.  All work on designs is done on my computer.  I'm at 156 and 34! 
Ceil

 


cas <cas@...>
 

Cheryl,
You’re right.  It makes me paranoid I’m wasting a lot of time instead of sewing!  Oh well, proper preparation is just as important. 
 
Jim, does it matter to dealers how many hours are on the machine, like for trade-in, like a car?
Cas

Kicking the tires, Jim says:
With so few machines even having a usage meter, dealers rely more on overall appearance and personal experience with a machine when appraising a machine for trade-in. In our years as dealers I saw 10 year old machines that looked new, as well as one-year-old machines that were beaten half to death. Some owners would have their machines in for service every few weeks to correct damage caused by careless use, only to be outraged when I failed to offer them a generous trade-in. In almost all cases it's not the number of hours that matters, but how the machine was treated during those hours.


bonnie waluda <waludabonnie@...>
 

No wonder I could not find the hours anywhere.  Thank you for the quick response.

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 22, 2016, at 8:55 AM, Cheryl Paul capaul@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Hi Bonnie,

The 12000 does not have the “hours” available to you. That was a new feature on the 15000, and I wish they had not given us the 2 numbers as it only makes us paranoid. Obviously the sewing time (needle up/down) is the important one, but we all like to keep both levels down, like our mileage on our automobiles. Makes no sense, as the more hours on sewing, means that we done some work and make beautiful things.

Cheryl - Saskatoon