Anita Goodesign Class


stevovaso@...
 

Hi Everyone...
I am considering taking an Anita Goodesign class and have never quilted before. It would be one of the quilt blocks in the hoop embroidery designs with the "flip & fold" method were the fabric strips are stitched while still in the hoop.

Has anyone done one of her projects and do any of you have any recommendations?

Thank you all in advance!



VLS
 

I have done them.  They are easy to follow directions.  Making a quilt in the hoop does waste more fabric than making a quilt the traditional way.
I use floraini no show mesh on the back, it doesn’t add bulk to the quilt and supports any stitched designs that the blocks may have.
 
Vicki
 

Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2016 9:21 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Anita Goodesign Class
 
 

Hi Everyone...
I am considering taking an Anita Goodesign class and have never quilted before. It would be one of the quilt blocks in the hoop embroidery designs with the "flip & fold" method were the fabric strips are stitched while still in the hoop.

Has anyone done one of her projects and do any of you have any recommendations?

Thank you all in advance!



Lucy Akers
 

I've used several of Anita's quilt patterns such as Flora & Fauna, Faith and Farm and used one of the big programs, Beautiful Blocks and Borders for borders because i didn't like the ones that came with the other sets. The different sets are "Mix and Match" and you can do just that.
The beauty of these blocks is that they have guidelines so that they are easy to sew together perfectly. The sort of bad side is that they take quite a while to sew out.
I've also used the mix and match programs, such as Old Frontier to make placemats.


Virginia
 

I find Anita Goodesign designs somewhat dense.  I think it would be a fund idea for you where you have an embroidery machine to take the class it will give you great ideas and teach you the quilt in the hoop technique.  Also you might want to check out "sweetpeaembroiderydesigns" she is fantastic.  She has a number of quilt in the hoop designs and she is very affordable and her designs are digitized to perfection and the quilting is somewhat unique but never dense.

I too use no show mesh in my hoop first and then cut my batting and fabric to size.  The no show mesh is a little wasteful but cutting my fabric and batting to size does save on fabric.

Hope this helps.

Virginia


-----Original Message-----
From: 'VLS' hshocraf@... [janome12000]
To: janome12000
Sent: Wed, Feb 24, 2016 8:25 am
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Anita Goodesign Class

 
I have done them.  They are easy to follow directions.  Making a quilt in the hoop does waste more fabric than making a quilt the traditional way.
I use floraini no show mesh on the back, it doesn’t add bulk to the quilt and supports any stitched designs that the blocks may have.
 
Vicki
 
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2016 9:21 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Anita Goodesign Class
 
 
Hi Everyone...
I am considering taking an Anita Goodesign class and have never quilted before. It would be one of the quilt blocks in the hoop embroidery designs with the "flip & fold" method were the fabric strips are stitched while still in the hoop.

Has anyone done one of her projects and do any of you have any recommendations?

Thank you all in advance!


HEATHER COWAN
 

I have some of her quilt block design sets and really like them.  I use a light weight poly batting called thermor so they are softer/more flexible.  They are not so dense as hoop sisters and finish beautifully.  Imho
Good luck
Heather 

On Feb 23, 2016, at 8:48 PM, stevovaso@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Hi Everyone...
I am considering taking an Anita Goodesign class and have never quilted before. It would be one of the quilt blocks in the hoop embroidery designs with the "flip & fold" method were the fabric strips are stitched while still in the hoop.

Has anyone done one of her projects and do any of you have any recommendations?

Thank you all in advance!



Sandra Wilbourne
 

Heather may I ask where you buy the poly batting/thermor. I have not heard of it? Thanks in advance. 

Sandra W. Wilbourne, MS, NBCT, LPCA
Licensed Professional Counselor Associate


"I have learned that people 
will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel."- Maya Angelou

On Feb 24, 2016, at 10:34 AM, HEATHER COWAN heather-c@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

I have some of her quilt block design sets and really like them.  I use a light weight poly batting called thermor so they are softer/more flexible.  They are not so dense as hoop sisters and finish beautifully.  Imho
Good luck
Heather 

On Feb 23, 2016, at 8:48 PM, stevovaso@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Hi Everyone...
I am considering taking an Anita Goodesign class and have never quilted before. It would be one of the quilt blocks in the hoop embroidery designs with the "flip & fold" method were the fabric strips are stitched while still in the hoop.

Has anyone done one of her projects and do any of you have any recommendations?

Thank you all in advance!



cas <cas@...>
 

I’ve seen some pictures of some cute items made with her designs.  How do you sew the blocks together?  Do the designs leave a seam allowance that does not have batting in it?
Cas


ceilsews <no_reply@...>
 

Cas,
I have the brick door stoppers set.  After the batting is tacked down it is trimmed (as you would do for applique in the hoop) and then the material goes on top of it.  This is likely the same (or a good idea) for quilt blocks too in order to reduce the batting in the seams.  I've learned to do this with other projects that don't call for that technique as it yields great results.
Ceil


cas <cas@...>
 

Thanks, I wish I had done that with the Hoopsisters blocks instead of trying to do it after, great idea!
 

From: ceilsews
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2016 3:05 PM
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Anita Goodesign Class
 
 

Cas,
I have the brick door stoppers set.  After the batting is tacked down it is trimmed (as you would do for applique in the hoop) and then the material goes on top of it.  This is likely the same (or a good idea) for quilt blocks too in order to reduce the batting in the seams.  I've learned to do this with other projects that don't call for that technique as it yields great results.
Ceil


Sandra King
 

I have done many Anita Goodesign quilt blocks end embroidery.  You will like the flip and sew method.  It's not at all had snd the instructions are plain.  By the way, just FYI, the owner is not a female and not named Anita.  The name came from "I need a good design."


SewKitty <stevovaso@...>
 

How interesting! Thanks for sharing that! I did see Steve Wilson's name as the owner of the company.

I appreciate all of the comments and suggestion and plan to do the Honeycomb wall hanging for my first project. Thanks to all of you!


From: "sharrisking@... [janome12000]"
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2016 8:45 AM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Anita Goodesign Class

 
I have done many Anita Goodesign quilt blocks end embroidery.  You will like the flip and sew method.  It's not at all had snd the instructions are plain.  By the way, just FYI, the owner is not a female and not named Anita.  The name came from "I need a good design."



ceilsews <no_reply@...>
 

Sandra,
I didn't see a reply to your question.  I believe it's this one made by Hobbs: Hobbs Thermore Batting from ConnectingThreads.com

 


Sue Raabe <susies.stitches@...>
 

I went to a 2 day class a few years ago, and to me, it was a big push to buy a Brother machine,and purchase Anita Goodesign products.  I  was supposed to stay with a friend, and go back the second day.  Instead I went home, never even using the $10 gift card I won from the store that sponsored it.  We were 4 to a machine, and I got very little out of it.  In contrast, I recently went to a Janome event, and it was much more productive.  We learned how the machines worked, and there were 3 instead of 4 to a machine.  Each of us was able to complete a whole project.  When my design didn't come quite as well as the others, they gave me another kit to take home, as well as kits for the other projects, so all of us went home with 4 kits.  They had the requisite sales pitches, and rang a cow bell whenever someone bought the 15000.  They also got a balloon to tie on their chair when all the presenters paraded to their seat.  The cow bell was a little hokey, but it was a fun day all in all.    I know this is a subjective opinion, but I enjoyed the Janome presentation so much better.  (The machines too!  I wasn't the least interested in buying a Brother machine in the first place.)  You may get entirely different reactions from others in this group, and I realize this is just one opinion out of many.  On the plus side, they had some beautiful embroidery and quilting samples to see and buy.


SewKitty <stevovaso@...>
 

Sue,
However subjective your opinion might be, I think it is relevant and I sympathize with the marketing push that dealers & machine companies put us through. I did notice within the tutorials on the CD I purchased, it was peppered with ads for more designs on CDs to purchase. It wasn't easy finding the "step by step" instructions I needed, but I managed to figure it out and will be ok.

I appreciate your input an all the others in our group that helped me out with this. Thanks a lot.



From: "Sue Raabe susies.stitches@... [janome12000]"
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2016 12:01 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Anita Goodesign Class

 
I went to a 2 day class a few years ago, and to me, it was a big push to buy a Brother machine,and purchase Anita Goodesign products.  I  was supposed to stay with a friend, and go back the second day.  Instead I went home, never even using the $10 gift card I won from the store that sponsored it.  We were 4 to a machine, and I got very little out of it.  In contrast, I recently went to a Janome event, and it was much more productive.  We learned how the machines worked, and there were 3 instead of 4 to a machine.  Each of us was able to complete a whole project.  When my design didn't come quite as well as the others, they gave me another kit to take home, as well as kits for the other projects, so all of us went home with 4 kits.  They had the requisite sales pitches, and rang a cow bell whenever someone bought the 15000.  They also got a balloon to tie on their chair when all the presenters paraded to their seat.  The cow bell was a little hokey, but it was a fun day all in all.    I know this is a subjective opinion, but I enjoyed the Janome presentation so much better.  (The machines too!  I wasn't the least interested in buying a Brother machine in the first place.)  You may get entirely different reactions from others in this group, and I realize this is just one opinion out of many.  On the plus side, they had some beautiful embroidery and quilting samples to see and buy.



JUDY
 

Sue, my feelings exactly,  but they were selling Babylocks! still had fun but we had SIX people to a machine! 


On Saturday, February 27, 2016 3:12 PM, "Sue Raabe susies.stitches@... [janome12000]" wrote:


 
I went to a 2 day class a few years ago, and to me, it was a big push to buy a Brother machine,and purchase Anita Goodesign products.  I  was supposed to stay with a friend, and go back the second day.  Instead I went home, never even using the $10 gift card I won from the store that sponsored it.  We were 4 to a machine, and I got very little out of it.  In contrast, I recently went to a Janome event, and it was much more productive.  We learned how the machines worked, and there were 3 instead of 4 to a machine.  Each of us was able to complete a whole project.  When my design didn't come quite as well as the others, they gave me another kit to take home, as well as kits for the other projects, so all of us went home with 4 kits.  They had the requisite sales pitches, and rang a cow bell whenever someone bought the 15000.  They also got a balloon to tie on their chair when all the presenters paraded to their seat.  The cow bell was a little hokey, but it was a fun day all in all.    I know this is a subjective opinion, but I enjoyed the Janome presentation so much better.  (The machines too!  I wasn't the least interested in buying a Brother machine in the first place.)  You may get entirely different reactions from others in this group, and I realize this is just one opinion out of many.  On the plus side, they had some beautiful embroidery and quilting samples to see and buy.



Tony Coley <coleyct@...>
 

Ladies, I have been to Brother, BL and Janome events by AG. Their primary goal is selling machines and design pack programs.
I've never been one to openly complain, but generally one of VERY few men at these events, the ladies at my table always wanted me to operate the machine because I had an embroidery business and a technical background.
On one occasion, I took a bathroom break when a project started just to get someone else to use the machine.
I will say AG has probably the largest selection of design packs(my bride has over 250) and they sew out quite well.
Happy sewing.

Sent from my iPad

On Feb 27, 2016, at 5:12 PM, JUDY PONIKVAR ponikvar60@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Sue, my feelings exactly,  but they were selling Babylocks! still had fun but we had SIX people to a machine! 


On Saturday, February 27, 2016 3:12 PM, "Sue Raabe susies.stitches@... [janome12000]" <janome12000@...> wrote:


 
I went to a 2 day class a few years ago, and to me, it was a big push to buy a Brother machine,and purchase Anita Goodesign products.  I  was supposed to stay with a friend, and go back the second day.  Instead I went home, never even using the $10 gift card I won from the store that sponsored it.  We were 4 to a machine, and I got very little out of it.  In contrast, I recently went to a Janome event, and it was much more productive.  We learned how the machines worked, and there were 3 instead of 4 to a machine.  Each of us was able to complete a whole project.  When my design didn't come quite as well as the others, they gave me another kit to take home, as well as kits for the other projects, so all of us went home with 4 kits.  They had the requisite sales pitches, and rang a cow bell whenever someone bought the 15000.  They also got a balloon to tie on their chair when all the presenters paraded to their seat.  The cow bell was a little hokey, but it was a fun day all in all.    I know this is a subjective opinion, but I enjoyed the Janome presentation so much better.  (The machines too!  I wasn't the least interested in buying a Brother machine in the first place.)  You may get entirely different reactions from others in this group, and I realize this is just one opinion out of many.  On the plus side, they had some beautiful embroidery and quilting samples to see and buy.



Pat Bryant
 

After owning my own stores for over 30 years, I can defend either side of this discussion...  It's difficult at times, to keep your doors open if you don't have something "new" to sell/promote...  The cost of owning a business these days is much higher than when I owned my stores.  My stores were always service based rather than sales based.  This worked well for us for many, many years.  What changed were the low end machines that were disposable.  I don't think I would enjoy a store where I had to "suggest" upgrading a machine every time a new model came out.  I think most customers want to keep up with the latest and greatest on the market, but, at the price of these new TOL machines...  whew!  But yes, most of these events are meant to introduce you to something new and exciting!  I love the Missouri Quilt Company for their techniques, well, until I get to the part about needing a new ruler or tool to do it the "easy" way  LOL  

I used to tell my ladies who were purchasing their first embroidery machine that the machine would be the least expensive part of their new hobby!  It's true if you think about it...  all of the speciality items along with thread, stabilizer etc along with all of those cool things we need/want to embroider on LOL  Oh and then add in the cost of all of those wonderful designs!  And on designs, it's "go big or go home" on the quantity!  LOL  

Pat
SewAmused@...
Always SewAmused at what we can do!


-----Original Message-----
From: SewKitty stevovaso@... [janome12000]
To: janome12000
Sent: Sat, Feb 27, 2016 9:41 pm
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Re: Anita Goodesign Class

 
Sue,
However subjective your opinion might be, I think it is relevant and I sympathize with the marketing push that dealers & machine companies put us through. I did notice within the tutorials on the CD I purchased, it was peppered with ads for more designs on CDs to purchase. It wasn't easy finding the "step by step" instructions I needed, but I managed to figure it out and will be ok.

I appreciate your input an all the others in our group tha t helped me out with this. Thanks a lot.



From: "Sue Raabe susies.stitches@... [janome12000]" <janome12000@...>
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2016 12:01 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Anita Goodesign Class

 
I went to a 2 day class a few years ago, and to me, it was a big push to buy a Brother machine,and purchase Anita Goodesign products.  I  was supposed to stay with a friend, and go back the second day.  Instead I went home, never even using the $10 gift card I won from the store that sponsored it.  We were 4 to a machine, and I got very little out of it.  In contrast, I recently went to a Janome event, and it was much more productive.  We learned how the machines worked, and there were 3 instead of 4 to a machine.  Each of us was able to complete a whole project.  When my design didn't come quite as well as the others, they gave me another kit to take home, as well as kits for the other projects, so all of us went home with 4 kits.  They had the requisite sales pitches, and rang a cow bell whenever someone bought the 15000.  They also got a balloon to tie on their chair when all the presenters paraded to their seat.  The cow bell was a little hokey, but it was a fun day all in all.    I know this is a subjective opinion, but I enjoyed the Janome presentation so much better.  (The machines too!  I wasn't the least interested in buying a Brother machine in the first place.)  You may get entirely different reactions from others in this group, and I realize this is just one opinion out of many.  On the plus side, they had some beautiful embroidery and quilting samples to see and buy.



Anne Parker
 

I can't believe there would be so many to one machine in a class.  I would certainly expect my own machine so I could try out things and not be rushed on anything - I am not a quick worker and like to think about things a lot before I do anything.

One thing I would really recommend to those in UK though is to take up your one day training on the 15000 at Stockport when you buy the machine - there is a little sales pitch in the middle of the day where you can order anything you want from the cataglogue, but apart from that it is an excellent day and you get a machine plus a full set of attachments to yourself.  Ann White the instructor is excellent and takes you through things very logically and is happy to explain if you don't understand and they only have a maximum of 4 people on the class, mine only had 3 -   We started a project for an iPad cover, and were given all the materials and instructions on how to complete it - I have yet to do that, mainly as I don't have an iPad, but it would fit another tablet or even a book if you so choose.


It was well worth the nearly 500 mile round trip from Stubbington, Fareham, Nr Portsmouth to Stockport!



Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"Live like someone left the gate open". Kimberly Burnham

 


Judy Jackson <judy.j282@...>
 

I totally agree with Ann on this. I have been up to Stockport on training for the last 3 Janome embroidery machines I have owned (I part exchange and upgrade ) each class has been tailored to the particular machine. On the latest training class I attended, the one for the 15000, there were only two of us (apparently there should have been three students one couldn't make it at the last minute). We also made the IPad case in a relaxed and fun day. I would also urge those in the UK to take advantage of this free training. .......I I live in Cornwall.......a 600 plus miles round trip!.......

Judy, Cornwall UK

Sent from my iPad

On 28 Feb 2016, at 18:31, Anne Parker lokicat6@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

I can't believe there would be so many to one machine in a class.  I would certainly expect my own machine so I could try out things and not be rushed on anything - I am not a quick worker and like to think about things a lot before I do anything.

One thing I would really recommend to those in UK though is to take up your one day training on the 15000 at Stockport when you buy the machine - there is a little sales pitch in the middle of the day where you can order anything you want from the cataglogue, but apart from that it is an excellent day and you get a machine plus a full set of attachments to yourself.  Ann White the instructor is excellent and takes you through things very logically and is happy to explain if you don't understand and they only have a maximum of 4 people on the class, mine only had 3 -   We started a project for an iPad cover, and were given all the materials and instructions on how to complete it - I have yet to do that, mainly as I don't have an iPad, but it would fit another tablet or even a book if you so choose.


It was well worth the nearly 500 mile round trip from Stubbington, Fareham, Nr Portsmouth to Stockport!



Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"Live like someone left the gate open". Kimberly Burnham