marks on 15000


J M
 

Hi,

     Has anyone noticed that after doing an embroidery design, some of the design etches onto the silver part of the machine bed and of course leaves marks?

                                                                                        Joyce


laucke2011@...
 

I have the 1200 and I cut a ipad screen saver to size and put it on the metal part to the right of the needle as the machine came with a stick on piece for the left side of the needle and mine is working fine, it has not come off, but for the problem you have I have never had it Naomi


juliadlf1 <no_reply@...>
 

How can the design get etched on the silver part of the bed since it stitches over the needle plate????


sewbad54 <no_reply@...>
 

If the outer  hoop rubs on the surface of the bed it will etch the design you are sewing in  the stainless steel

To stop this make sure when you hoop you push the inner hoop down a little bit so it is a little proud of the outer hoop. Now when machine sews, the hooped  fabric will be resting on the machine bed instead of the outer hoop.

A friend of mine had the same thing happen and this method of hooping stopped anymore wear on the bed.


Janome make a special protector set  to cover the stainless steel bed on the right of the needle ( a larger version of the one that came with the 15000 for the area on the left of needle)

The part number is...........  Protective Sheets  859434003 price  £15.00 in the UK and includes two protective sheets one large and one small. I have bought these and they work well.


Anne Parker <annegparker@...>
 

£15 (equivalent to about 9.5 dollars) seems a lot of money for a bit of plastic protection? 

I've tried searching but nowhere have a found a photo or a proper description of what these sheets are made of or what shape they actually are?  What are they made of - are they just the same thing you use on a phone or tablet screen for instance?  So basically just a 'screen protector' for the free arm?  Does anyone have a photo of them?

I guess I will find out when my machine arrives with the supplied piece for the left hand side.

Seems strange to me that Janome create a machine bed that then needs to have a protector - if that is the case I would have expected it with the machine or for them to have made it from something else.

Sorry for all the questions.

Anne
​ in Stubbington, UK​

www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.  "Desiderata" Max Ehrmann

On 15 October 2014 21:37, sewbad54 <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

If the outer  hoop rubs on the surface of the bed it will etch the design you are sewing in  the stainless steel

To stop this make sure when you hoop you push the inner hoop down a little bit so it is a little proud of the outer hoop. Now when machine sews, the hooped  fabric will be resting on the machine bed instead of the outer hoop.

A friend of mine had the same thing happen and this method of hooping stopped anymore wear on the bed.


Janome make a special protector set  to cover the stainless steel bed on the right of the needle ( a larger version of the one that came with the 15000 for the area on the left of needle)

The part number is...........  Protective Sheets  859434003 price  £15.00 in the UK and includes two protective sheets one large and one small. I have bought these and they work well.



annegparker@...
 

Whoops I did the conversion the wrong way! - £15 is about 24 dollars! - as I said a lot for a bit of plastic if that is all it is.

Anne in Stubbington, UK
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.  "Desiderata" Max Ehrmann


sewbad54 <no_reply@...>
 

Anne look in the Janome accessories catalogue 2013 (this is the latest edition) bottom of page 15 for info but know picture. For me £15.00 is a price I was happy to pay to protect my machine from scratches as I have seen etching caused by the outer  hoop scraping the bed of the machine


I don't use screen protectors so can't comment if they are the same thing. The protectors are quite thick so do stop scratches  from pins etc.


Anne Parker <annegparker@...>
 

I've downloaded the accessory catalogue from here now - www.janome.co.jp/e/pdf/home/AccessoryCatalog.pdf
Then searched it for 'Protective Sheet' and it displayed a picture on page 81. 

It certainly does look just like the better quality tablet screen protectors.

If the hoop etches a design in the bed surely that's a design fault of Janome?  I'm surprized given all the other accessories they supply including the protector for the left side of the bed (as I understand it) that they don't also provide the one for the right side to 'correct' their design error.

I agree that it's worth having to protect the machine - but maybe I am finding issues where I won't have any (my
​ pessimism coming out again!) - especially given the tip about pushing the top hoop down a bit.  Has anyone ever thought about binding the bottom hoop with fabric or is that not possible - I know this will all become evident when I get the machine, but still waiting for my ordered V2 to get to UK. :0)

Anne
​ in Stubbington, UK​

www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.  "Desiderata" Max Ehrmann

On 16 October 2014 00:40, sewbad54 <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

Anne look in the Janome accessories catalogue 2013 (this is the latest edition) bottom of page 15 for info but know picture. For me £15.00 is a price I was happy to pay to protect my machine from scratches as I have seen etching caused by the outer  hoop scraping the bed of the machine


I don't use screen protectors so can't comment if they are the same thing. The protectors are quite thick so do stop scratches  from pins etc.



Blessed are the pessimists, for they shall never be disappointed.


Cheryl Paul
 

Anne, in response to your words:  £15 (equivalent to about 9.5 dollars) seems a lot of money for a bit of plastic protection?  

In Canada we pay $20 for a wee sheet of protective cover for our iPhones or Androids - it's the same I think for the iPad's and other tablets.  So $10 is half that price and you get 2 - I'm assuming one for each side of the needle plate.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Anne Parker <annegparker@...>
 

Hi Cheryl

I did my conversion the wrong way around for US Dollars  :0) - £15 is actually around 24 US Dollars or 27 Canadian dollars.

I can get 2 quality iPad protectors for just under £5 on Amazon ( http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=iPad%20protective%20film) so I still say it's pricey. (I can get cheap ones for 6 for just under £2 but would not buy those)

My main point though is that Janome is making a machine that has a bed that is going to get damaged using it - not very good design really.  If that is unavoidable I would expect to have the protectors included with the machine, not have to buy them, especially with all the other accessories they provide - but as I said maybe I am just being pessimistic and I will not get the issue. :0)

Anne
​ in Stubbington, UK​

www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.  "Desiderata" Max Ehrmann

On 16 October 2014 15:33, capaul@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:
 

Anne, in response to your words:  £15 (equivalent to about 9.5 dollars) seems a lot of money for a bit of plastic protection?  


In Canada we pay $20 for a wee sheet of protective cover for our iPhones or Androids - it's the same I think for the iPad's and other tablets.  So $10 is half that price and you get 2 - I'm assuming one for each side of the needle plate.

Cheryl - Saskatoon



Claire Schutz
 

I saw package of this in Dollar Tree and yes, one dollar, Claire S.


On 10/16/2014 9:33 AM, capaul@... [janome12000] wrote:
 

Anne, in response to your words:  £15 (equivalent to about 9.5 dollars) seems a lot of money for a bit of plastic protection?  


In Canada we pay $20 for a wee sheet of protective cover for our iPhones or Androids - it's the same I think for the iPad's and other tablets.  So $10 is half that price and you get 2 - I'm assuming one for each side of the needle plate.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Linda M
 

Whoever originally converted this to USD does not know what they are talking about
 

15.00 GBP = 24.1140 USD
British Pound US Dollar
1 GBP = 1.60760 USD 1 USD = 0.622045 GBP
Convert againUSD/GBP thumbnailView ChartMid-market rates: 2014-10-17 03:34 UTC
 
 
 
 

-------Original Message-------
 
Date: 16/10/2014 8:38:35 PM
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Re: marks on 15000
 
 

I saw package of this in Dollar Tree and yes, one dollar, Claire S.


On 10/16/2014 9:33 AM, capaul@... [janome12000] wrote:
 

Anne, in response to your words:  £15 (equivalent to about 9.5 dollars) seems a lot of money for a bit of plastic protection?  


In Canada we pay $20 for a wee sheet of protective cover for our iPhones or Androids - it's the same I think for the iPad's and other tablets.  So $10 is half that price and you get 2 - I'm assuming one for each side of the needle plate.

Cheryl - Saskatoon

 


maggie cooper
 

Anne, stainless steel as nice as it looks when brand new is a real bind to keep free from scuff marks and scratches. The stainless steel inset was designed not for its beauty by Janome, but to assist the free movement of fabric when doing free motion quilting. So it wasn't a bad design choice, if it gets scuffed by hoops then the inner hoop hasn't been properly bedded into the outer hoop. If the stabiliser or threads scuff or scratch the stainless steel then as someone else has pointed out non stick contact plastic can be used to prevent that happening. The machine is a tool, not an ornament, and no matter how well we take care of our tools, they will show some signs of use.


On my Tajima industrial machine the large rectangular hoop has thin felt applied to the base of the hoop to prevent any real damage to the large very shiny support table. It works a treat, my support table shows no signs of scratches, some very slight scuff marks, which to me means I'm underusing my machine. Also means I haven't used my sewists silicon spray to keep the table slick and slippery as often as I should do.


I purchased the Janome 8200QCP sewing machine rather than the 8900 precisely because it didn't have the stainless steel bed, I was relieved to find the 9900 didn't have a stainless steel bed either. Why? easy, all my oven ware, saucepans, cooker hood, and draining board and sink is stainless steel, and contrary to it's name it does stain, does scratch easily, requires constant cleaning, which I begrudge as it robs time that could be spent with my machines.

Maggie Cooper UK



JoAnn Novak
 

  Well said.  I like your tips.
  I have a stainless steel sink in my kitchen.
  I am thinking about replacing it as it is terribly scratched.
  It is well used.  lol
  JoAnn
Life's biggest decision is what you do with Jesus.

 

Anne, stainless steel as nice as it looks when brand new is a real bind to keep free from scuff marks and scratches. The stainless steel inset was designed not for its beauty by Janome, but to assist the free movement of fabric when doing free motion quilting. So it wasn't a bad design choice, if it gets scuffed by hoops then the inner hoop hasn't been properly bedded into the outer hoop. If the stabiliser or threads scuff or scratch the stainless steel then as someone else has pointed out non stick contact plastic can be used to prevent that happening. The machine is a tool, not an ornament, and no matter how well we take care of our tools, they will show some signs of use.


On my Tajima industrial machine the large rectangular hoop has thin felt applied to the base of the hoop to prevent any real damage to the large very shiny support table. It works a treat, my support table shows no signs of scratches, some very slight scuff marks, which to me means I'm underusing my machine. Also means I haven't used my sewists silicon spray to keep the table slick and slippery as often as I should do.


I purchased the Janome 8200QCP sewing machine rather than the 8900 precisely because it didn't have the stainless steel bed, I was relieved to find the 9900 didn't have a stainless steel bed either. Why? easy, all my oven ware, saucepans, cooker hood, and draining board and sink is stainless steel, and contrary to it's name it does stain, does scratch easily, requires constant cleaning, which I begrudge as it robs time that could be spent with my machines.

Maggie Cooper UK




Claire Schutz
 

In regard to the hoops, there is a little lip on the outer hoop which prevents you from having the inner hoop go thru too far.  The reason I mention this is I have another machine and the hoops do not have that and you can push the inner hoop too far and have other problems, I have done that.  I was pleased to see this can not be done with the 15K hoops, therefore, if used like you say Mags, no marks. The inner hoop protrudes very slightly, so no one needs to worry about doing what I have done with other manufacturers hoops. Also, I feel a little scratches between friends doesn't mean abuse but use,  Claire S.



On 10/17/2014 7:30 AM, maggiecoops@... [janome12000] wrote:
 

Anne, stainless steel as nice as it looks when brand new is a real bind to keep free from scuff marks and scratches. The stainless steel inset was designed not for its beauty by Janome, but to assist the free movement of fabric when doing free motion quilting. So it wasn't a bad design choice, if it gets scuffed by hoops then the inner hoop hasn't been properly bedded into the outer hoop. If the stabiliser or threads scuff or scratch the stainless steel then as someone else has pointed out non stick contact plastic can be used to prevent that happening. The machine is a tool, not an ornament, and no matter how well we take care of our tools, they will show some signs of use.


On my Tajima industrial machine the large rectangular hoop has thin felt applied to the base of the hoop to prevent any real damage to the large very shiny support table. It works a treat, my support table shows no signs of scratches, some very slight scuff marks, which to me means I'm underusing my machine. Also means I haven't used my sewists silicon spray to keep the table slick and slippery as often as I should do.


I purchased the Janome 8200QCP sewing machine rather than the 8900 precisely because it didn't have the stainless steel bed, I was relieved to find the 9900 didn't have a stainless steel bed either. Why? easy, all my oven ware, saucepans, cooker hood, and draining board and sink is stainless steel, and contrary to it's name it does stain, does scratch easily, requires constant cleaning, which I begrudge as it robs time that could be spent with my machines.

Maggie Cooper UK




Anne Parker <annegparker@...>
 

Thanks for the reply Maggie

It's good to hear that if you use the hoops properly then the scratches are not inevitable - :0).  Whilst I agree it's not an ornament I do like to keep my machines (and anything else) as good looking as possible.  I know they will not be perfect.

I have 12 vintage machines (oldest from 1883) which I have cleaned up and restored so that they look great and sew well. It's part of the pleasure for me to sew on something that looks good.

I remember the stainless steel sinks and cooker hoods - a nightmare to clean and people used to be surprized that they were easily damaged - mixing up stainless with scratch resistant.

If your going to put plastic over the stainless steel what is the point of having the stainless steel in the first place?  I guess maybe it's easier to see the measurments on the bed in metal though.

Interesting about the felt on the bottom of your Taijma hoops - maybe I will consider something similar for the 15000 should I find it necessary :0)

Anne
​ in Stubbington, UK​

www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.  "Desiderata" Max Ehrmann

On 17 October 2014 13:30, maggiecoops@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:
 

Anne, stainless steel as nice as it looks when brand new is a real bind to keep free from scuff marks and scratches. The stainless steel inset was designed not for its beauty by Janome, but to assist the free movement of fabric when doing free motion quilting. So it wasn't a bad design choice, if it gets scuffed by hoops then the inner hoop hasn't been properly bedded into the outer hoop. If the stabiliser or threads scuff or scratch the stainless steel then as someone else has pointed out non stick contact plastic can be used to prevent that happening. The machine is a tool, not an ornament, and no matter how well we take care of our tools, they will show some signs of use.


On my Tajima industrial machine the large rectangular hoop has thin felt applied to the base of the hoop to prevent any real damage to the large very shiny support table. It works a treat, my support table shows no signs of scratches, some very slight scuff marks, which to me means I'm underusing my machine. Also means I haven't used my sewists silicon spray to keep the table slick and slippery as often as I should do.


I purchased the Janome 8200QCP sewing machine rather than the 8900 precisely because it didn't have the stainless steel bed, I was relieved to find the 9900 didn't have a stainless steel bed either. Why? easy, all my oven ware, saucepans, cooker hood, and draining board and sink is stainless steel, and contrary to it's name it does stain, does scratch easily, requires constant cleaning, which I begrudge as it robs time that could be spent with my machines.

Maggie Cooper UK