My Janome 12000


Anne <csarina43@...>
 

Yesterday afternoon whilst I was sewing my new 12000 started to act up changing stitches when I was no where near the screen and telling me that the embroidry arm was not open, did I want to open it? I managed to finish what I was doing, but when I went to use the machine today it did the same, so I phoned my dealer who told me to unplug the machine and leave it for four hours and then try it again.....did it behave??? Nope. Unfotunately my dealer had to leave early, so unitl he phones me tomorrow morning the machine is standing forlorn in the corner and my 11000 is on the sewing table, am I glad I have not sold her yet.


Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Bummer! Be glad that it did not "recover" after the 4 hour rest. Intermittent problems can be infuriating to suffer, and to fix. A hard failure like yours will be much easier to sort out, most likely with a new motherboard.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Anne" <csarina43@...> wrote:

Yesterday afternoon whilst I was sewing my new 12000 started to act up changing stitches when I was no where near the screen and telling me that the embroidry arm was not open, did I want to open it? I managed to finish what I was doing, but when I went to use the machine today it did the same, so I phoned my dealer who told me to unplug the machine and leave it for four hours and then try it again.....did it behave??? Nope. Unfotunately my dealer had to leave early, so unitl he phones me tomorrow morning the machine is standing forlorn in the corner and my 11000 is on the sewing table, am I glad I have not sold her yet.


Anne <csarina43@...>
 

Heard from my dealer this morning, the machine is being picked up tomorrow, Janome want it back along with the embroidery arm, they say they have not come across the problem before........so we will wait and see what happens next.

If your 12000 starts changing the stitches and asks if you want to embroider.....phone your dealer.


vicki chrobak
 

Just a thought Anne--do you have your machine plugged into a UPC to protect it from power surges? If not, maybe there was a power surge that messed something up.

--
Vicki Jo

Yesterday afternoon whilst I was sewing my new 12000 started to act up changing stitches when I was no where near the screen and telling me that the embroidry arm was not open, did I want to open it? I managed to finish what I was doing, but when I went to use the machine today it did the same, so I phoned my dealer who told me to unplug the machine and leave it for four hours and then try it again.....did it behave??? Nope. Unfotunately my dealer had to leave early, so unitl he phones me tomorrow morning the machine is standing forlorn in the corner and my 11000 is on the sewing table, am I glad I have not sold her yet.

_


Anne <csarina43@...>
 

No its not plugged into a surge protector, when it started misbehaving we were watching TV had there been a power surge I would have thought it would have affected everything?


Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

A surge like that would likely have left scorch marks on the walls! Most electronic failures occur within the first 30 days, which is the timeframe for Anne's machine. I'm guessing it's just a failure of a component on the motherboard, which will be corrected by replacement. They may just give her a new machine and send that one back to Japan for dissection.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, vicki chrobak <tulsajo1@...> wrote:

Just a thought Anne--do you have your machine plugged into a UPC to
protect it from power surges? If not, maybe there was a power surge
that messed something up.

--
Vicki Jo

Yesterday afternoon whilst I was sewing my new 12000 started to act up changing stitches when I was no where near the screen and telling me that the embroidry arm was not open, did I want to open it? I managed to finish what I was doing, but when I went to use the machine today it did the same, so I phoned my dealer who told me to unplug the machine and leave it for four hours and then try it again.....did it behave??? Nope. Unfotunately my dealer had to leave early, so unitl he phones me tomorrow morning the machine is standing forlorn in the corner and my 11000 is on the sewing table, am I glad I have not sold her yet.

_


vicki chrobak
 

Actually it's an APC battery back-up and surge protector. Your TV & sewing machine are probably on separate circuits. It's possible you may have something on the same circuit as the s.m. that uses a lot of power--like fridge, washer, iron,etc. so if one comes on while s.m. is on it could affect it. I'm not an expert here but I know I would not go without one. Less than $100 investment to protect one we've paid about $12,000 for! Somehow it also backs up the machines memory--don't ask me how though. Jim would probably be able to explain. Also keep my laptop plugged on it.

--
Vicki Jo

No its not plugged into a surge protector, when it started misbehaving
we were watching TV had there been a power surge I would have thought it
would have affected everything?


vicki chrobak
 

OK Jim. Guess I'm just a believer in protecting my larger investments.

--
Vicki Jo

A surge like that would likely have left scorch marks on the walls! Most electronic failures occur within the first 30 days, which is the timeframe for Anne's machine. I'm guessing it's just a failure of a component on the motherboard, which will be corrected by replacement. They may just give her a new machine and send that one back to Japan for dissection.


Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

I'm not arguing about that. Virtually all of the electronic gear in our house is on battery-backed UPS systems. My point is that a power surge would have to be devastating to cause the condition that Ann was experiencing.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, vicki chrobak <tulsajo1@...> wrote:

OK Jim. Guess I'm just a believer in protecting my larger investments.

--
Vicki Jo

A surge like that would likely have left scorch marks on the walls! Most electronic failures occur within the first 30 days, which is the timeframe for Anne's machine. I'm guessing it's just a failure of a component on the motherboard, which will be corrected by replacement. They may just give her a new machine and send that one back to Japan for dissection.


Vikki Youngmeyer
 

When I bought my Janome 350e, it failed 8 months after I got it. I downloaded an upgrade to my flash drive and installed it on the machine. When the machine rebooted it didn’t make it past the Janome banner screen. There was no power failure, glitch or any sort of electrical abnormalities in my house. All the digital clocks without battery backups were still working and showed the correct time. The coffee pot was still showing 9:30am and hadn’t reset itself to midnight! The computers were still behaving themselves! Things just give up sometimes without any help from outside forces or Mother Nature!

 

Turns out the mother board just “gave up the ghost”! The unfortunate thing was the timing when this happened. It happened two days before Hurricane Irene hit the Houston area. With the power out in the store we had to order the part from work using a cell phone and have it shipped to my house and not the store. Getting past that hurdle was difficult! Power had been restored where I lived, but it was still out for another two weeks at the store location.

 

Once the store owner replaced the mother board, which took about an hour and needed an “intervention” from the Janome techie, the machine worked as well as ever and it was one of two that I traded in for the 12000.

 

Vikki

Houston, TX


Anne <csarina43@...>
 

Thanks for the comment re my machine, I have not idea what the surge protector is you are talking about. I am in the UK I have my two lap tops on a surge protector but did not think to use one for the machine. I did not know you can get one with a battery back up, tell me more!!

I will wait and see what Pete the techie has to say about it when he gets to look at it, as you say Jim they may well decide to send me a new machine and send mine back to Japan.

I did not have any problems with my 11000 until the needle threader failed just before Christmas, I am so glad I still have it. One thing the dealer did not tell me was that they had taken the machine back to its base stage and I had to re install the two updates....could not understand why I could not find the 'J' key to slide the seam guide into position. I know there were a few problems with the 11000 in the first place, which does happen with something new.


Maria Boyle
 

Hello Anne,

This is a ups battery backup surge protector. Not sure if this picture will come through to the group. If it does not, I will post a picture of it in my yahoo album (Maria B)



I have an 18 x 8 quilting machine with a Quilt Sew Clever ( a quilt designs automated quilting computer ).. I was getting intermittent black screens and sometimes it would reboot and I would have to start over. I thought my QSC was defective. Was having problems with my machine coming to a sudden halt & restarting. I had both my Machine and QSC plugged into a regular power surge strip.

Then I read somewhere that I should have these plugged into a ups battery backup surge protector. Now I have no problems at all.



María

Sent from my iPad

On Feb 8, 2012, at 4:54 AM, "Anne" <csarina43@gmail.com> wrote:

Thanks for the comment re my machine, I have not idea what the surge protector is you are talking about. I am in the UK I have my two lap tops on a surge protector but did not think to use one for the machine. I did not know you can get one with a battery back up, tell me more!!

I will wait and see what Pete the techie has to say about it when he gets to look at it, as you say Jim they may well decide to send me a new machine and send mine back to Japan.

I did not have any problems with my 11000 until the needle threader failed just before Christmas, I am so glad I still have it. One thing the dealer did not tell me was that they had taken the machine back to its base stage and I had to re install the two updates....could not understand why I could not find the 'J' key to slide the seam guide into position. I know there were a few problems with the 11000 in the first place, which does happen with something new.





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vicki chrobak
 

Anne, I am not a techie but probably Jim or someone else can explain. They of course protect from surging but in addition are kind of like having an extra back-up hard-drive. That's the way I understand it anyway with my feeble mind. Generally wherever they sell computers they should sell these. Like office supply stores, Best Buy, Staples, Sam's. I'm sure you should be able to buy on-line st Amazon, etc.
Vicki Jo

Thanks for the comment re my machine, I have not idea what the surge
protector is you are talking about. I am in the UK I have my two lap
tops on a surge protector but did not think to use one for the machine. I
did not know you can get one with a battery back up, tell me more!!


maggie cooper
 

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Anne" <csarina43@...> wrote:

No its not plugged into a surge protector, when it started misbehaving we were watching TV had there been a power surge I would have thought it would have affected everything?
Anne and I live in Great Britain, and though we do get fluctitions to our power supplies, its usually brown outs that cause problems. For example if there's a big sports event on TV, during an interval thousands of kettles will get turned on, and there's a very short lived power drop. Our main house fuse boards would trip out before we get anything zappedby a power surge and all our electrical items including sewing/embroidery machines have fused power plugs rated to the item they're attached to.
Maggie Cooper


maggie cooper
 

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Anne" <csarina43@...> wrote:

Thanks for the comment re my machine, I have not idea what the surge protector is you are talking about. I am in the UK I have my two lap tops on a surge protector but did not think to use one for the machine. I did not know you can get one with a battery back up, tell me more!!
Anne, a power surge protector with battery back up isnt needed in Great Britain, our domestic electricity system is stable. The only real reason for needing one in this country would be if you were a hospital, data storage centre, on a home dyalisis machine where a sudden loss of power would be disastrous.Those all have instant back up generators to provide emergency power and the banks of batterries needed to provide an instant source of power until the generators start kicking out enough power.

I had an 8 hour power cut just yesterday, some one had struck a mains cable with a pickaxe, and with the weather we're having right now, having the power cut for even an hour is uncomfortable. A UPS battery would have been drained long before the power returned. The so called power surge protected extension leads we have here do exactly the same as your plug socket, the fuse blows. So your machine never gets a blast of power that could fry it internally unless you insert a fuse rated higher than your machine requires.A bad idea at any time. Don't waste money on surge protection or unit protection systems with battery back up, you dont need them in UK.
Maggie Cooper.


vicki chrobak
 

Thank you Maggie for educating me. The fused power plugs, are they like surge protectors?

--
Vicki Jo


--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Anne"<csarina43@...> wrote:

No its not plugged into a surge protector, when it started misbehaving we were watching TV had there been a power surge I would have thought it would have affected everything?
Anne and I live in Great Britain, and though we do get fluctitions to our power supplies, its usually brown outs that cause problems. For example if there's a big sports event on TV, during an interval thousands of kettles will get turned on, and there's a very short lived power drop. Our main house fuse boards would trip out before we get anything zappedby a power surge and all our electrical items including sewing/embroidery machines have fused power plugs rated to the item they're attached to.
Maggie Cooper

_


Anne <csarina43@...>
 

In the UK all electrical appliances have a fuse fitted in the plug, so should there be a surge higher than the rating of the fuse, the fuse blows and prevents the appliance from damage. I know that was not the problem with my machine, as had the fuse failed the power would not get through to the machine until the damaged fuse was replaced and the switch on the fuse board reset. My machine still had pwer, it just would not work.

I am actually very cross and so is my dealer, the couriers were told to pick up the machine yesterday, and did not.

I had a delivery by the couriers on Tuesday an hour after I had spoken to my dealer and arrnaged for the machine to be returned. The courier asked for the parcel which was to go back? Did they think I was super woman and could read minds?????

When they did not turn up yesterday I phoned my dealer and he contacted the company and was told that the chap on the delivery had marked his sheet nothing to go back!!!! How they managed to get a message to him that quick must have been by phone......he could have phoned them amd told them what I had said......when he came the box was down from the attic but not made up for the machine to go in. I was not a happy lady and nor was OH pleased, he had stayed in all afternoon waiting for them to call and collect it.


vicki chrobak
 

I understand now about the fused plug Anne. Please forgive my ignorance.
You have a right to be very cross. I'm afraid my blood pressure would be through the roof and then some!

--
Vicki Jo

In the UK all electrical appliances have a fuse fitted in the plug, so should there be a surge higher than the rating of the fuse, the fuse blows and prevents the appliance from damage. I know that was not the problem with my machine, as had the fuse failed the power would not get through to the machine until the damaged fuse was replaced and the switch on the fuse board reset. My machine still had pwer, it just would not work.

I am actually very cross and so is my dealer, the couriers were told to pick up the machine yesterday, and did not.

I had a delivery by the couriers on Tuesday an hour after I had spoken to my dealer and arrnaged for the machine to be returned. The courier asked for the parcel which was to go back? Did they think I was super woman and could read minds?????

When they did not turn up yesterday I phoned my dealer and he contacted the company and was told that the chap on the delivery had marked his sheet nothing to go back!!!! How they managed to get a message to him that quick must have been by phone......he could have phoned them amd told them what I had said......when he came the box was down from the attic but not made up for the machine to go in. I was not a happy lady and nor was OH pleased, he had stayed in all afternoon waiting for them to call and collect it.


maggie cooper
 

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, vicki chrobak <tulsajo1@...> wrote:

Thank you Maggie for educating me. The fused power plugs, are they like
surge protectors?

--
Vicki Jo

Hi Vicki, I wasn't trying to educate you sweetheart but stop Anne spending her hard to gather savings. We have a higher voltage rating here in Gt Britain and Europe, 230 volta with a 10% leeway up or down. We also have a system of transformers and invertors en route to the point of use, i,e, the consumer. Before any current can be drawn by a cosumer it has to pass through a 'mains consumer board' which has a 'max load fuse' inserted in such a way any attempt to change that mains max load fuse will be seen. We have fused circuits, normally in 2 storey house, 2 lighting circuits, one for each floor, 2 socket circuits, also one for each floor, a cooker circuit with an isolater switch plus its own fuse and the circuit fuse. If you do as we did, extend your home it has to have new circuits laid from the mains board and have seperate circuits for lighting and sockets. All appliances must have fused power plugs, rated at the highest amperage level for that appliance, no higher. If a fuse is blown in a plug socket it switches off the whole of that circuit by tripping its circuit breaker on the the mains fuse board. In the unlikely event the draw on a circuit exceeds the maximum load of 13 amps then the circuit breaker will cut the power to that circuit via the trip switch. The consumer board and each circuit is ground earthed, usually to a mains water pipe as it enters the house as that passes directly into the soil outside the building. The mains power line is also ground earthed before entering the meter, and then the consumer board, so the whole system is designed on the belt and bracers principle. So I suppose in a way it does operate a little like a power surge protector, but our Computers, electronic micro processor goods are more likely to be damaged by static than power surges over here.

Since the arrival of central heating, man made fibres used in clothing and carpets, we ourselves generate an enormous amount of static. I have wood floors, real wool rugs, wear rubber soled house shoes and always ground myself by touching the metal housing of my PC before turning it on. I keep humidifiers topped up to prevent the air getting dry enough to create static, and remove plugs from sockets when an item isnt being used, never leave any appliances on standby, (TV or PC on standby consumes more electricity then when being used) the only appliances never turned off are the freezer,refrigerator, and gas boiler, they have an extremely low power draw.
maggie cooper.


vicki chrobak
 

That is a phenomenal system Maggie. Thank you very much for explaining. Although I've spent time in the far east & used transformers I never went to UK or Europe & I do like education in whatever form. And I just thought everyone used/needed surge protectors.

--
Vicki Jo

Hi Vicki, I wasn't trying to educate you sweetheart but stop Anne
spending her hard to gather savings. We have a higher voltage rating
here in Gt Britain and Europe, 230 volta with a 10% leeway up or down.
We also have a system of transformers and invertors en route to the
point of use, i,e, the consumer. Before any current can be drawn by a
cosumer it has to pass through a 'mains consumer board' which has a 'max
load fuse' inserted in such a way any attempt to change that mains max
load fuse will be seen. We have fused circuits, normally in 2 storey
house, 2 lighting circuits, one for each floor, 2 socket circuits, also
one for each floor, a cooker circuit with an isolater switch plus its
own fuse and the circuit fuse. If you do as we did, extend your home it
has to have new circuits laid from the mains board and have seperate
circuits for lighting and sockets. All appliances must have fused
power plugs, rated at the highest amperage level for that appliance,
no higher. If a fuse is blown in a plug socket it switches off the
whole of that circuit by tripping its circuit breaker on the the mains
fuse board. In the unlikely event the draw on a circuit exceeds the
maximum load of 13 amps then the circuit breaker will cut the power to
that circuit via the trip switch. The consumer board and each circuit
is ground earthed, usually to a mains water pipe as it enters the house
as that passes directly into the soil outside the building. The mains
power line is also ground earthed before entering the meter, and then
the consumer board, so the whole system is designed on the belt and
bracers principle. So I suppose in a way it does operate a little like a
power surge protector, but our Computers, electronic micro processor
goods are more likely to be damaged by static than power surges over
here.



Since the arrival of central heating, man made fibres used in clothing
and carpets, we ourselves generate an enormous amount of static. I
have wood floors, real wool rugs, wear rubber soled house shoes and
always ground myself by touching the metal housing of my PC before
turning it on. I keep humidifiers topped up to prevent the air getting
dry enough to create static, and remove plugs from sockets when an
item isnt being used, never leave any appliances on standby, (TV or PC
on standby consumes more electricity then when being used) the only
appliances never turned off are the freezer,refrigerator, and gas
boiler, they have an extremely low power draw.

maggie cooper.