Topics

FSL with 12000

Claire Schutz
 

I would contact Sue Box, they give good help, Claire S.

On 3/4/2020 3:57 PM, Flossie Schayah wrote:
Does anyone know what built in laces on the 12000 are meant to be sewn directly onto fabric?

Page 142 of the 12000 Instruction Book shows the built in Lace patterns. My notes show that I stitched the 2 butterflies onto thick stabilizer for a card using 40 weight thread at 110%.

I am planning to use my free arm sewing machine to literally stitch stabilizer to the back of the neckline curve as well as stay stitch the soluble to the front. I hope there won't be much movement. I am not planning to embroidery  onto or past the neck.

I was hoping to use a beautiful lace from Sue Box but I guess it is too dense for a t shirt.

Thank you to everyone who has tried to help me,
Flossie

Tracy
 

Flossie-

I looked at the designs in the machine's manual- but cannot tell from the photo if they are free-standing or not.  That being said- if you fuse no-show-mesh or another cut-away to the underside of the tee, and float a tear-away under your hoop, you should be able to stitch the lace directly onto the shirt.  You might want to give this a try on a "test shirt" (one that you use for all sorts of designs when you want to see how they stitch out.... I've got several of these that started out to be "oops" shirts but then I use them for testing designs).  You will have time to perfect your technique if the shirt is for you to wear in May.  I've had great luck using fusible no-show-mesh on stretchy fabrics to hold things still and not prevent the tees (or other items) from being stiff as a board when done.  But- it will always support the design that way.  Trim it down after the stitching is done because you will want the no-show-mesh to be behind the entire hooping of the shirt.  Re-heating it when your stitching is done, will loosen the hold of the fusible and let you peel it back, trim, then heat a 3rd time to re-seal the edges. 

I wouldn't use water-soluble or heat-soluble on this as it won't support the design thru wearing and washing.  A topping can be added if your shirt has any nap to it but that won't support the design either.

Tracy in Nashville, TN

Martha Pullen Licensed Educator

Flossie Schayah
 

Does anyone know what built in laces on the 12000 are meant to be sewn directly onto fabric?

Page 142 of the 12000 Instruction Book shows the built in Lace patterns. My notes show that I stitched the 2 butterflies onto thick stabilizer for a card using 40 weight thread at 110%.

I am planning to use my free arm sewing machine to literally stitch stabilizer to the back of the neckline curve as well as stay stitch the soluble to the front. I hope there won't be much movement. I am not planning to embroidery  onto or past the neck.

I was hoping to use a beautiful lace from Sue Box but I guess it is too dense for a t shirt.

Thank you to everyone who has tried to help me,
Flossie

Elizabeth Mccall
 

The 15000 has some lace designs, in with the all the built in designs,  that I stitched on dissoluble product , washed away the soluble product , then machine stitched  these on the back & front pockets  denim jackets. 
I was told to use the same thread in the bobbin as the top thread. It's nice to use an antique lace color. These  could be used on hand towels too that are difficult to sew on.
Elizabeth Ann 
Western NC Quilt Guild

On Tue, Mar 3, 2020 at 9:36 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
"Depending on the design" is the key statement.
Most free standing lace designs are too stitch dense to stitch directly onto fabric.
A tee shirt type knit would be especially vulnerable to a bad stitch out. It doesn't have the structure needed to hold up the embroidery.
That's why the free standing lace is stitched first onto water soluble stabilizer and then stitched onto the garment.
You can try it, but I'd suggest going to the 2nd hand store and getting a 'disposable' shirt of a similar or same fabric to experiment on.
IF you do decide to stitch directly onto the tee shirt, use a no show Mesh stabilizer.
Or look for a lace design that is meant to be stitched onto fabric, not a free standing lace.

--
Favymtz

favymtz
 

"Depending on the design" is the key statement.
Most free standing lace designs are too stitch dense to stitch directly onto fabric.
A tee shirt type knit would be especially vulnerable to a bad stitch out. It doesn't have the structure needed to hold up the embroidery.
That's why the free standing lace is stitched first onto water soluble stabilizer and then stitched onto the garment.
You can try it, but I'd suggest going to the 2nd hand store and getting a 'disposable' shirt of a similar or same fabric to experiment on.
IF you do decide to stitch directly onto the tee shirt, use a no show Mesh stabilizer.
Or look for a lace design that is meant to be stitched onto fabric, not a free standing lace.

--
Favymtz

Mary Mills
 

Yes you can sew directly on top, depending on the design, I just iron on some light interfacing on back of where you are embroidering and hoop and sew, you might need some solvy on top.  If the lace is on the edge of the item you will have to place it carefully onto washaway and sew so it catches your top.   Regards, Mary

Flossie Schayah
 

Can I sew a FreeStandingLace pattern directly onto a t shirt if I use enough wash away stabaliser? I really don't want to have to stitch out the lovely lace flowers and then have to sew on it again to attach it to the neckline.

Thanks, Flossie