Topics

Janome 550e

Betty S
 

Anyone own a Janome 550e? What are your thoughts about this model?

Betty

Pam Davison
 

I just recently got one.   It embroiders ok so far but really haven't had the time to play


From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> on behalf of Betty S via Groups.Io <ekscott78@...>
Sent: Friday, December 13, 2019 3:22:15 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] Janome 550e
 
Anyone own a Janome 550e? What are your thoughts about this model?

Betty

bhoryn
 

I just got mine last week as an early Christmas present.      It has been a learning curve as I have embroidered for many years with pfaff.    My biggest problem has been with the bobbin thread being brought to the top of the design.   Haven’t been able to fix this problem yet.   Hope to be able to spend more time with it next week.    The people here have been great answering my questions 

On Friday, December 13, 2019, 6:03 PM, Pam Davison <pamyjo2001@...> wrote:

I just recently got one.   It embroiders ok so far but really haven't had the time to play


From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> on behalf of Betty S via Groups.Io <ekscott78@...>
Sent: Friday, December 13, 2019 3:22:15 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] Janome 550e
 
Anyone own a Janome 550e? What are your thoughts about this model?

Betty

favymtz
 

re  the bobbin thread being brought to the top of the design.
Make sure that you have the bobbin in correctly. If you have it in backwards it will pull the bobbin thread up to the top.
Look carefully at the diagram on the bobbin cover, it shows that the thread comes off to the left (counter clockwise) and then through the tension.
Other issues could be the type of bobbin thread you use and which bobbin case, the yellow dot case has a tighter tension which may help your problem.
--
Favymtz

Kathy Strabel
 

Hello Janome Group--
This may be a silly question as I may simply be missing something, but when I begin to stitch a design with my 500e machine, I want to bring the bobbin thread up to the top so I can hold both the bobbin and top threads out of the way for a clean, knot-free start without the thread tails getting bolluxed up at the beginning. I am not talking a giant bird nest, but there always seems to be a small "jumble" of threads at the beginning of a color change. ANd at the very beginning. I bring the bobbin thread up, wrap loosely around a finger and hold them out of the way, but the hoop always jumps a short distance and the needle does not pierce the fabric in the place where the needle is waiting to begin stitching. Thus, I have created another thread tail, which then gets jumbled up.  The machine stitches very nicely on the top surface, but there are always those darn little tails that look so messy and require tweezers and scissors to neaten-up.  Why does the hoop move at the beginning, when he needle is poised above the exact middle point of the design?   Any comments welcome     Kathy S   Cams WA

--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel




HEATHER COWAN
 

Hi Kathy:  I also pull the bottom thread up to make a nice clean start.  I find if I move the needle to stitch one .... I have the 15000, 9900 and MB4 and they allow me to advance a stitch.  This moves the needle from the center position to the position of the first thread.  Once in the position of stitch one I do a needle up and down and ..... voila ...  nice tidy start on the front and back of my design.  Good luck.

On Dec 15, 2019, at 8:43 AM, Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:


Hello Janome Group--
This may be a silly question as I may simply be missing something, but when I begin to stitch a design with my 500e machine, I want to bring the bobbin thread up to the top so I can hold both the bobbin and top threads out of the way for a clean, knot-free start without the thread tails getting bolluxed up at the beginning. I am not talking a giant bird nest, but there always seems to be a small "jumble" of threads at the beginning of a color change. ANd at the very beginning. I bring the bobbin thread up, wrap loosely around a finger and hold them out of the way, but the hoop always jumps a short distance and the needle does not pierce the fabric in the place where the needle is waiting to begin stitching. Thus, I have created another thread tail, which then gets jumbled up.  The machine stitches very nicely on the top surface, but there are always those darn little tails that look so messy and require tweezers and scissors to neaten-up.  Why does the hoop move at the beginning, when he needle is poised above the exact middle point of the design?   Any comments welcome     Kathy S   Cams WA

--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel




Lyn Quine
 

I haven’t got the 500e, but this happens with a lot of purchased designs, the start is away from the centre so the machine moves to the first stitch.  When I want to pull the bobbin up I press the start button and stop it straight away, the machine normally then stops above the starting point.  I can then pull the thread up.  I use the same method when the bobbin runs out mid design.  I bring the thread up, having gone back a few stitches, hen I h9ld the bobbin and top thread on the work in the direction of stitching, this stitches over the top of the threads, when there’s enough covered I move the ends out of the way of stitching and cut off close to the stitching.

J Fraker
 

If you advance to stitch number one, then pull up your bobbin thread, then press start, you will eliminate that problem


On Sun, Dec 15, 2019, 11:43 AM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Hello Janome Group--
This may be a silly question as I may simply be missing something, but when I begin to stitch a design with my 500e machine, I want to bring the bobbin thread up to the top so I can hold both the bobbin and top threads out of the way for a clean, knot-free start without the thread tails getting bolluxed up at the beginning. I am not talking a giant bird nest, but there always seems to be a small "jumble" of threads at the beginning of a color change. ANd at the very beginning. I bring the bobbin thread up, wrap loosely around a finger and hold them out of the way, but the hoop always jumps a short distance and the needle does not pierce the fabric in the place where the needle is waiting to begin stitching. Thus, I have created another thread tail, which then gets jumbled up.  The machine stitches very nicely on the top surface, but there are always those darn little tails that look so messy and require tweezers and scissors to neaten-up.  Why does the hoop move at the beginning, when he needle is poised above the exact middle point of the design?   Any comments welcome     Kathy S   Cams WA

--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel




bhoryn
 

I love all these hints. Just getting used to my 550e and wondered how to do this. Hope to spend the day embroidering out Christmas designs of t-towels so will give this a try.    


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Sunday, December 15, 2019, 11:48 AM, HEATHER COWAN <heather-c@...> wrote:

Hi Kathy:  I also pull the bottom thread up to make a nice clean start.  I find if I move the needle to stitch one .... I have the 15000, 9900 and MB4 and they allow me to advance a stitch.  This moves the needle from the center position to the position of the first thread.  Once in the position of stitch one I do a needle up and down and ..... voila ...  nice tidy start on the front and back of my design.  Good luck.

On Dec 15, 2019, at 8:43 AM, Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:


Hello Janome Group--
This may be a silly question as I may simply be missing something, but when I begin to stitch a design with my 500e machine, I want to bring the bobbin thread up to the top so I can hold both the bobbin and top threads out of the way for a clean, knot-free start without the thread tails getting bolluxed up at the beginning. I am not talking a giant bird nest, but there always seems to be a small "jumble" of threads at the beginning of a color change. ANd at the very beginning. I bring the bobbin thread up, wrap loosely around a finger and hold them out of the way, but the hoop always jumps a short distance and the needle does not pierce the fabric in the place where the needle is waiting to begin stitching. Thus, I have created another thread tail, which then gets jumbled up.  The machine stitches very nicely on the top surface, but there are always those darn little tails that look so messy and require tweezers and scissors to neaten-up.  Why does the hoop move at the beginning, when he needle is poised above the exact middle point of the design?   Any comments welcome     Kathy S   Cams WA

--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel




DeeDee Bedard
 

The needle sets up in the center however when you start to sew it moves to the beginning of the design.  Just jog it to the first stitch and pull up thread before you start.

On December 15, 2019 at 10:08 AM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:

Hello Janome Group--
This may be a silly question as I may simply be missing something, but when I begin to stitch a design with my 500e machine, I want to bring the bobbin thread up to the top so I can hold both the bobbin and top threads out of the way for a clean, knot-free start without the thread tails getting bolluxed up at the beginning. I am not talking a giant bird nest, but there always seems to be a small "jumble" of threads at the beginning of a color change. ANd at the very beginning. I bring the bobbin thread up, wrap loosely around a finger and hold them out of the way, but the hoop always jumps a short distance and the needle does not pierce the fabric in the place where the needle is waiting to begin stitching. Thus, I have created another thread tail, which then gets jumbled up.  The machine stitches very nicely on the top surface, but there are always those darn little tails that look so messy and require tweezers and scissors to neaten-up.  Why does the hoop move at the beginning, when he needle is poised above the exact middle point of the design?   Any comments welcome     Kathy S   Cams WA

--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel





 

Kathy Strabel
 

This message is in response to all the members who replied to my question about avoiding a thread tangle on the underside at the beginning of a design, and at the beginning of each color change.  I want to say THANK YOU---this is a major forehead-slapper for me!!!   DUH!!!   Sometimes the obvious just does not seem obvious!!  THank you again for solving this very annoying problem that I was experiencing!!!!    This Group, and others in the same vein, are SOOOOOOO helpful!!
Kathy S.    Camas  WA

Kathy Strabel
 

Hope you enjoy your 550E, I have the 500E and looked at the 550E when it first came out. I believe they are basically the same machine, but with some different accessories--a larger hoop, maybe some additional things. Did you have to oil your machine when you first set it up? I was very surprised that my 500E requires the user to oil it every month, if it is used on a daily basis. I use mine each week, but not every day, so I do it a bit less. None of the pre-sale literature I saw, nor any of the sales people ever mentioned the oiling requirement. Hmmmmmmm.  It would have been nice to have had that information up front. It has not been a deal-breaker, but it should have been disclosed. I wonder if the newer 550E also has this requirement?  Kathy Strabel  Camas WA

On Mon, Dec 16, 2019 at 6:20 AM bhoryn via Groups.Io <bhoryn=yahoo.ca@groups.io> wrote:
I love all these hints. Just getting used to my 550e and wondered how to do this. Hope to spend the day embroidering out Christmas designs of t-towels so will give this a try.    


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Sunday, December 15, 2019, 11:48 AM, HEATHER COWAN <heather-c@...> wrote:

Hi Kathy:  I also pull the bottom thread up to make a nice clean start.  I find if I move the needle to stitch one .... I have the 15000, 9900 and MB4 and they allow me to advance a stitch.  This moves the needle from the center position to the position of the first thread.  Once in the position of stitch one I do a needle up and down and ..... voila ...  nice tidy start on the front and back of my design.  Good luck.

On Dec 15, 2019, at 8:43 AM, Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:


Hello Janome Group--
This may be a silly question as I may simply be missing something, but when I begin to stitch a design with my 500e machine, I want to bring the bobbin thread up to the top so I can hold both the bobbin and top threads out of the way for a clean, knot-free start without the thread tails getting bolluxed up at the beginning. I am not talking a giant bird nest, but there always seems to be a small "jumble" of threads at the beginning of a color change. ANd at the very beginning. I bring the bobbin thread up, wrap loosely around a finger and hold them out of the way, but the hoop always jumps a short distance and the needle does not pierce the fabric in the place where the needle is waiting to begin stitching. Thus, I have created another thread tail, which then gets jumbled up.  The machine stitches very nicely on the top surface, but there are always those darn little tails that look so messy and require tweezers and scissors to neaten-up.  Why does the hoop move at the beginning, when he needle is poised above the exact middle point of the design?   Any comments welcome     Kathy S   Cams WA

--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel






--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel




bhoryn
 

Hi Kathy.      Just came up for a cup of tea and checked this site.   Yes my 550e needs oiling.  Dealer didn’t mention it but the instructions in the book did.     Haven’t attempted it yet but will do so when Christmas things are done.     Looks quite involved 🥴
 
Each time I use the machine I find things I quite like and the odd thing I liked better on my old PFAFF.   
 

On Monday, December 16, 2019, 9:44 AM, Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:

Hope you enjoy your 550E, I have the 500E and looked at the 550E when it first came out. I believe they are basically the same machine, but with some different accessories--a larger hoop, maybe some additional things. Did you have to oil your machine when you first set it up? I was very surprised that my 500E requires the user to oil it every month, if it is used on a daily basis. I use mine each week, but not every day, so I do it a bit less. None of the pre-sale literature I saw, nor any of the sales people ever mentioned the oiling requirement. Hmmmmmmm.  It would have been nice to have had that information up front. It has not been a deal-breaker, but it should have been disclosed. I wonder if the newer 550E also has this requirement?  Kathy Strabel  Camas WA

 
--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel




Jim Stutsman
 

I'm going to jump in here for a comment. Yes, until now most of Janome's non-commercial machines did not require oiling. This was because the parts with metal-on-metal contact are manufactured with a process that embeds oil in the metal. As the machine is used, when friction gets to a certain point the heat will bring the embedded oil to the surface, thereby "self-lubricating" the machine. This process was accompanied by the presumption that home machines would not get an extraordinary amount of use, and would be presented to the dealer for servicing on a regular basis. The dealer could then take care of oiling as needed.

That plan worked pretty well for the 8000, the first Janome consumer machine to do embroidery, and it was also working for the 9000. However when the 10000 came out it was possible to make larger designs, as well as use designs digitized by others. The price of the machine was low enough that a lot of people used it to go into the embroidery business. Running a machine for hours every single day went well beyond the duty cycle that the engineers had planned on. It was further complicated by a drive system that used a shaft in a bushing instead of a ball bearing. Machines started locking up due to lack of oil, and that in turn was destroying the bushing. The repair is dirty, difficult, and time consuming. I did so many of them that I eventually got it down to 30 minutes. This same problem also showed up in the 300E, 350E, 9400, and 9700.

I think with the 500E and later, Janome now realizes that people will use these machines commercially even though they are not sold for that purpose. They can exclude commercial use from the warranty, but it's pretty hard to prove and telling a customer her warranty has been invalidated is not a good strategy for repeat business. So now they are trying to avoid trouble by just coming out and advising the user to oil the machine. This is line with the MB-4 and MB-7 commercial machines which are supposed to be oiled frequently, and come with oil. It's not a big deal, but the key thing about oiling machines is MODERATION. Excess oil is messy and can stain fabric. A single drop is usually ample, with the exception of the wick which can get a bit more IF IT IS DRY. Once a month for daily use is probably also OK, but if you use it only a few times a week you could probably stretch it to 3 months or more. When oiling a shaft (Page 61, items 4, 5, & 6) you can put a drop of oil on a Q-Tip and rub that on the shaft. This will keep the oil from getting all over.

Pixey
 

You might also check the group archives.  I think someone previously posted a YouTube link that shows someone oiling the 500e and it was very helpful to me to see how the end panels are removed...two of them are a bit finicky.  The first couple of times were pretty nerve wracking, but now I am more comfortable doing it.

Pixey

On Dec 16, 2019, at 10:45 AM, Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

I'm going to jump in here for a comment. Yes, until now most of Janome's non-commercial machines did not require oiling. This was because the parts with metal-on-metal contact are manufactured with a process that embeds oil in the metal. As the machine is used, when friction gets to a certain point the heat will bring the embedded oil to the surface, thereby "self-lubricating" the machine. This process was accompanied by the presumption that home machines would not get an extraordinary amount of use, and would be presented to the dealer for servicing on a regular basis. The dealer could then take care of oiling as needed.

That plan worked pretty well for the 8000, the first Janome consumer machine to do embroidery, and it was also working for the 9000. However when the 10000 came out it was possible to make larger designs, as well as use designs digitized by others. The price of the machine was low enough that a lot of people used it to go into the embroidery business. Running a machine for hours every single day went well beyond the duty cycle that the engineers had planned on. It was further complicated by a drive system that used a shaft in a bushing instead of a ball bearing. Machines started locking up due to lack of oil, and that in turn was destroying the bushing. The repair is dirty, difficult, and time consuming. I did so many of them that I eventually got it down to 30 minutes. This same problem also showed up in the 300E, 350E, 9400, and 9700.

I think with the 500E and later, Janome now realizes that people will use these machines commercially even though they are not sold for that purpose. They can exclude commercial use from the warranty, but it's pretty hard to prove and telling a customer her warranty has been invalidated is not a good strategy for repeat business. So now they are trying to avoid trouble by just coming out and advising the user to oil the machine. This is line with the MB-4 and MB-7 commercial machines which are supposed to be oiled frequently, and come with oil. It's not a big deal, but the key thing about oiling machines is MODERATION. Excess oil is messy and can stain fabric. A single drop is usually ample, with the exception of the wick which can get a bit more IF IT IS DRY. Once a month for daily use is probably also OK, but if you use it only a few times a week you could probably stretch it to 3 months or more. When oiling a shaft (Page 61, items 4, 5, & 6) you can put a drop of oil on a Q-Tip and rub that on the shaft. This will keep the oil from getting all over.

Mary Jo Hirsch
 

Does the 15000 require oiling by user?

On Mon, Dec 16, 2019 at 10:50 AM Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm going to jump in here for a comment. Yes, until now most of Janome's non-commercial machines did not require oiling. This was because the parts with metal-on-metal contact are manufactured with a process that embeds oil in the metal. As the machine is used, when friction gets to a certain point the heat will bring the embedded oil to the surface, thereby "self-lubricating" the machine. This process was accompanied by the presumption that home machines would not get an extraordinary amount of use, and would be presented to the dealer for servicing on a regular basis. The dealer could then take care of oiling as needed.

That plan worked pretty well for the 8000, the first Janome consumer machine to do embroidery, and it was also working for the 9000. However when the 10000 came out it was possible to make larger designs, as well as use designs digitized by others. The price of the machine was low enough that a lot of people used it to go into the embroidery business. Running a machine for hours every single day went well beyond the duty cycle that the engineers had planned on. It was further complicated by a drive system that used a shaft in a bushing instead of a ball bearing. Machines started locking up due to lack of oil, and that in turn was destroying the bushing. The repair is dirty, difficult, and time consuming. I did so many of them that I eventually got it down to 30 minutes. This same problem also showed up in the 300E, 350E, 9400, and 9700.

I think with the 500E and later, Janome now realizes that people will use these machines commercially even though they are not sold for that purpose. They can exclude commercial use from the warranty, but it's pretty hard to prove and telling a customer her warranty has been invalidated is not a good strategy for repeat business. So now they are trying to avoid trouble by just coming out and advising the user to oil the machine. This is line with the MB-4 and MB-7 commercial machines which are supposed to be oiled frequently, and come with oil. It's not a big deal, but the key thing about oiling machines is MODERATION. Excess oil is messy and can stain fabric. A single drop is usually ample, with the exception of the wick which can get a bit more IF IT IS DRY. Once a month for daily use is probably also OK, but if you use it only a few times a week you could probably stretch it to 3 months or more. When oiling a shaft (Page 61, items 4, 5, & 6) you can put a drop of oil on a Q-Tip and rub that on the shaft. This will keep the oil from getting all over.

--
null

Jim Stutsman
 

No. The only place you could possibly oil is the wick under the bobbin case. A couple of drops of oil in there once or twice a year is more than sufficient. All other oiling can and should be done by your dealer during servicing.