Topics

Metallic Thread

Meryl Margolies
 

Undaunted by my failure, I intend to try metallic thread again. But...I'm needing some expert advice.
What's the best needle to use and MC12000-friendly thread brands would be helpful.
--
Thank you,
Meryl

Jim Stutsman
 

Metallic thread works best with a large eye. Schmetz makes needles for metallic thread that have a larger-than-normal eye. If you don't have access to those, use a topstitch 14. Janome/Organ topstitch needles also have a larger than normal eye.

In addition, most metallic threads are wound in such a way that they feed best from the side of the spool when it is mounted vertically. As the thread unrolls it does not twist, as it would if the spool were mounted in the standard horizontal way. You can use the extra spool pin provided on some models, but only if it mounts vertically. There are third-party accessories that allow the thread to feed without twisting. Here are some examples:
http://a.co/d/bSspkYu
The Thread Director - Specialty Thread Spool Pin Adapter$24.99Sewforless.comFree shipping, no tax

HEATHER COWAN
 

Meryl .... I have wonderful success with Marathon metallics.  The ones in the 4000 series of thread numbers are least problematic.  I slow the machine down and use the large eye organ needle.  I also believe that the quality of the design is important.  I swear some designers are so good you could use barb wire and it would stitch out.  I have even done designs by Momo Dini on chiffon with metallics .... the designs are digitized that well.  Good luck....
Hugs. Heather

On Oct 14, 2018, at 07:51, Meryl Margolies <machinequilter1@...> wrote:

Undaunted by my failure, I intend to try metallic thread again. But...I'm needing some expert advice.
What's the best needle to use and MC12000-friendly thread brands would be helpful.
--
Thank you,
Meryl

Angie Rowe
 

I also read that storing your metallic thread in the freezer helps also. Don’t remember the reason behind it, just that it was a suggestion. What needle is consider best to use for metallic thread?

Take Care & God Bless
Angie

On Oct 14, 2018, at 11:28 AM, juliadlf.ny@... wrote:

Just a comment since I got the Thread Director and found it awkward to mount on the 12000. Definitely use metallic needles. Slow your speed down and make sure
the thread is not twisting and not overly tight as it unwinds as I found this was the main reason I initially had trouble when I had the 12000. 
I have used Guttermann (tiny spools and expensive) and some other brands but found it wasn't the thread as much as using the right needle, how it was unwinding
and speed of the machine.  
Julia

Jim Stutsman
 

Use a Metallica needle, made for metallic threads. If that's not available use a topstitch 14.

Claire Schutz
 

To your list you may want to add, loosen tension slightly, all this together works for me, Claire S.

On 10/14/2018 10:28 AM, juliadlf.ny@... wrote:
Just a comment since I got the Thread Director and found it awkward to mount on the 12000. Definitely use metallic needles. Slow your speed down and make sure
the thread is not twisting and not overly tight as it unwinds as I found this was the main reason I initially had trouble when I had the 12000. 
I have used Guttermann (tiny spools and expensive) and some other brands but found it wasn't the thread as much as using the right needle, how it was unwinding
and speed of the machine.  
Julia

Pixey
 

I have a basic question...

Is there any risk of metallic thread actually harming the machine?  I ask because we talk about using high quality threads and the vulnerability of the tension disks, the bobbin area, etc.  It just seems to be common sense that if lint-ty thread can cause problems...something that is shedding hard metal/Mylar could even be more problematic...or am I overthinking it?  

I have a couple of design packs that ideally call for metallic threads and bought the thread (Superior, Madeira, and Robison-Anton). I’ve seen the recommendations of slowing the speed, letting the thread spool off in a relaxed and non twisting manner, large eye needle, etc.  but have hesitated to take the step of trying it.

Thanks,
Pixey



Jim Stutsman
 

Pixey you raise a good point. We had a customer several years back who used an 11000 to make "Night Before Christmas" books from the Dakota Designs pack of the same name. He actually co-opted his wife's machine for this and, being retired, used it all day, every day. In many of the pages there was snow. For that he used a white metallic that had an iridescent look to it. After the first couple of books he brought the machine in, complaining that it wouldn't cut the thread. After disassembly I found the thread cutter mechanism jammed with metallic thread. The "crunchy" nature of it was not conducive to clean cutting and it wedged between the blades. The effect was not unlike using your good sewing scissors to cut barbed wire. After tearing down the cutter, removing all the bits, and rebuilding it I advised him to turn it OFF whenever using metallics. This advice was ignored and I got used to seeing the machine every 2 or 3 weeks with much grumbling about it being a lemon. He also had a habit of not always getting the thread in the take-up lever, resulting in many cases of bobbin case and hook race damage. I did enough free repairs on that machine to cancel out most of the profit made on selling it, but it did cause me to advise all our customers to turn off the thread cutter whenever using metallic thread.

Ceil J
 

Thanks for the tip about turning off the thread cutter.  I recently made some potholders using Insul Bright and doing an open embroidery design on it as it was next to my backing fabric.  I was alarmed when after completing the first one, someone posted on a sewing site that the Insul Bright left lots of metal bits in the bobbin area of her machine when she embroidered on it.  After inspecting all with a magnifying glass, I never found any bits and inspected again for them after the last pot holder was finished.  Perhaps if the metallic thread is old and brittle (I should talk), it might flake off but the few times I've used it I've never seen any bits.  I will post a sign in my metallic thread drawer to remind me to turn off the thread cutter, however.  Thanks again for that information.

Ann Jones
 

Jim and Pixie give very sound advice re metallic threads. I use Superior and King metallics - my much older other brands I  have used with mixed results and tend to avoid and even put in hand sewing use only pile. Always thread by hand and turn off thread cutter on advice from my dealer (au). Also found some metallics needed a different thread  (not 80 prewound for example) in the bobbin to be picked up smoothly. This was trial and error re the bobbin thread so if your thread appears to be skipping try a change of bobbin thread type.
Ann



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On Tuesday, 16 October 2018, 3:18:54 AM ACDT, onlinesewing via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:


Pixey you raise a good point. We had a customer several years back who used an 11000 to make "Night Before Christmas" books from the Dakota Designs pack of the same name. He actually co-opted his wife's machine for this and, being retired, used it all day, every day. In many of the pages there was snow. For that he used a white metallic that had an iridescent look to it. After the first couple of books he brought the machine in, complaining that it wouldn't cut the thread. After disassembly I found the thread cutter mechanism jammed with metallic thread. The "crunchy" nature of it was not conducive to clean cutting and it wedged between the blades. The effect was not unlike using your good sewing scissors to cut barbed wire. After tearing down the cutter, removing all the bits, and rebuilding it I advised him to turn it OFF whenever using metallics. This advice was ignored and I got used to seeing the machine every 2 or 3 weeks with much grumbling about it being a lemon. He also had a habit of not always getting the thread in the take-up lever, resulting in many cases of bobbin case and hook race damage. I did enough free repairs on that machine to cancel out most of the profit made on selling it, but it did cause me to advise all our customers to turn off the thread cutter whenever using metallic thread.

Pixey
 

Thanks Jim. I had not even thought about turning off the cutter.

Am thinking I might actually test it on my old, slower (and much more portable) 350E so I am not taking my main machines out of availability if something goes wrong.

Pixey


On Oct 15, 2018, at 11:08 AM, onlinesewing via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

Pixey you raise a good point. We had a customer several years back who used an 11000 to make "Night Before Christmas" books from the Dakota Designs pack of the same name. He actually co-opted his wife's machine for this and, being retired, used it all day, every day. In many of the pages there was snow. For that he used a white metallic that had an iridescent look to it. After the first couple of books he brought the machine in, complaining that it wouldn't cut the thread. After disassembly I found the thread cutter mechanism jammed with metallic thread. The "crunchy" nature of it was not conducive to clean cutting and it wedged between the blades. The effect was not unlike using your good sewing scissors to cut barbed wire. After tearing down the cutter, removing all the bits, and rebuilding it I advised him to turn it OFF whenever using metallics. This advice was ignored and I got used to seeing the machine every 2 or 3 weeks with much grumbling about it being a lemon. He also had a habit of not always getting the thread in the take-up lever, resulting in many cases of bobbin case and hook race damage. I did enough free repairs on that machine to cancel out most of the profit made on selling it, but it did cause me to advise all our customers to turn off the thread cutter whenever using metallic thread.

Mary Galea <nunkuri@...>
 

Oh my goodness! Co-opting his wife’s machine and using it like that.....!!! My husband isn’t game to even ask me if he can turn my Queen Fifi on, let alone use her! His sole role with her, is to lift her in and out of the car. 😉 


On 17 Oct 2018, at 3:12 am, Pixey via Groups.Io <pixeyam@...> wrote:

Thanks Jim. I had not even thought about turning off the cutter.

Am thinking I might actually test it on my old, slower (and much more portable) 350E so I am not taking my main machines out of availability if something goes wrong.

Pixey


On Oct 15, 2018, at 11:08 AM, onlinesewing via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

Pixey you raise a good point. We had a customer several years back who used an 11000 to make "Night Before Christmas" books from the Dakota Designs pack of the same name. He actually co-opted his wife's machine for this and, being retired, used it all day, every day. In many of the pages there was snow. For that he used a white metallic that had an iridescent look to it. After the first couple of books he brought the machine in, complaining that it wouldn't cut the thread. After disassembly I found the thread cutter mechanism jammed with metallic thread. The "crunchy" nature of it was not conducive to clean cutting and it wedged between the blades. The effect was not unlike using your good sewing scissors to cut barbed wire. After tearing down the cutter, removing all the bits, and rebuilding it I advised him to turn it OFF whenever using metallics. This advice was ignored and I got used to seeing the machine every 2 or 3 weeks with much grumbling about it being a lemon. He also had a habit of not always getting the thread in the take-up lever, resulting in many cases of bobbin case and hook race damage. I did enough free repairs on that machine to cancel out most of the profit made on selling it, but it did cause me to advise all our customers to turn off the thread cutter whenever using metallic thread.

SparkleFever
 

@Meryl Marolies

My favourite metallics are Kingstar Metallic Threads. 

I use them on both Janome 11000 and 15000

My only issue is they don't do a purple metallic in the range . . . sighs.
--
SparkleFever

Meryl Margolies
 

Thank you. Where is the best place to buy?
--
Thank you,
Meryl

Johnstonr9@...
 

I use metallic thread all the time. The secret is Sewers Aid. It’s a lubricant applied directly to the spool. I run a bead down 4 sides of the spool. It helps feed the metallic thread smoothly through the machine and needl, does not gum up the machine or show on the project. Also large eye needle helps.