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15000 and power surger

Mary Jo Hirsch
 

I took my machine to the shop due to a message “ raise foot and needle and turn on again”.  Came home with same message. Unplugged the machine from power surger and plugged in to wall plug.  Machine worked fine.  Can someone tell me this would be happening.

Cat - N
 

By "power surger", do you mean a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) battery backup, or a surge supressor (6-way power outlet that protects from power spikes)?

- Cat (FL)



-----Original Message-----
From: Mary Jo Hirsch <mjhshmoo@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Dec 28, 2019 10:22 pm
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] 15000 and power surger

I took my machine to the shop due to a message “ raise foot and needle and turn on again”.  Came home with same message. Unplugged the machine from power surger and plugged in to wall plug.  Machine worked fine.  Can someone tell me this would be happening.

Mary Gajdica-Albers <mgajdica@...>
 

Try retreading and cleaning bobbin case - mine did the same thing . 


On Dec 28, 2019, at 9:22 PM, Mary Jo Hirsch <mjhshmoo@...> wrote:

I took my machine to the shop due to a message “ raise foot and needle and turn on again”.  Came home with same message. Unplugged the machine from power surger and plugged in to wall plug.  Machine worked fine.  Can someone tell me this would be happening.

Theresa Lindal
 

Could be a faulty power surge protector.

Jim Stutsman
 

Switching the plug from a surge suppressor to the wall connection could not have caused the message. The message you got is a generic one that more accurately should say "One of the self-tests failed, but I'm not going to tell you which one." On the 15000 the needle plate sensor is a popular place for this to occur, as the switch is very tiny and has a limited range of travel. Moving the machine to unplug it could have caused it to stop failing. Sometimes removing the needle plate and reinstalling it is enough, but it also sometimes requires adjustment by a technician to stop the error.

Jim Stutsman
 

What most people don't realize is that the surge suppressor built into the $10 "power strip" sold pretty much everywhere only works once or twice. The part that keeps it cheap is a Metal Oxide Variable resistor (MOV). It will stop a surge, but the surge itself destroys the device. Once a strip has encountered one or two surges, it's essentially just an extension cord that offers no protection at all. Contrast this with a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply, not the brown truck) which physically disconnects from the power whenever the voltage is too low or too high. This offers better protection, but has the annoyance of a battery that fails in 3-5 years. Worse, you usually won't know that the battery has failed until the power goes out. When it comes back most of them wail uncontrollably with a dead battery. This ranks right up there with smoke alarms that always wait until 2am to signal the fact that their batteries need replacing.

Carole Hollmann
 

Jim—

I’ve just had another bubble burst, as I have “surge protectors” on all my more expensive items. While I paid more than $10 US, they are probably no longer protecting anything. I don’t want the 20-pound UPS devices all over the place, so is there anything that can be used that might offer some protection?

I leave my sewing machines unplugged unless I’m actually using them. 

Thanks. 

Carole



On Dec 29, 2019, at 9:42 AM, Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

What most people don't realize is that the surge suppressor built into the $10 "power strip" sold pretty much everywhere only works once or twice. The part that keeps it cheap is a Metal Oxide Variable resistor (MOV). It will stop a surge, but the surge itself destroys the device. Once a strip has encountered one or two surges, it's essentially just an extension cord that offers no protection at all. Contrast this with a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply, not the brown truck) which physically disconnects from the power whenever the voltage is too low or too high. This offers better protection, but has the annoyance of a battery that fails in 3-5 years. Worse, you usually won't know that the battery has failed until the power goes out. When it comes back most of them wail uncontrollably with a dead battery. This ranks right up there with smoke alarms that always wait until 2am to signal the fact that their batteries need replacing.

Mary Jo Hirsch
 

Surge suppressor.   Read Jim’s response and had done those already.  Unplugging did the trick don’t know why.

On Sun, Dec 29, 2019 at 8:25 AM Cat - N via Groups.Io <navillusc=netscape.net@groups.io> wrote:
By "power surger", do you mean a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) battery backup, or a surge supressor (6-way power outlet that protects from power spikes)?

- Cat (FL)



-----Original Message-----
From: Mary Jo Hirsch <mjhshmoo@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Dec 28, 2019 10:22 pm
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] 15000 and power surger

I took my machine to the shop due to a message “ raise foot and needle and turn on again”.  Came home with same message. Unplugged the machine from power surger and plugged in to wall plug.  Machine worked fine.  Can someone tell me this would be happening.

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Jim Stutsman
 

Back in the early 90s I set up a number of computers for a client. He bought industrial surge protectors at a cost of around $1,500 each in 1990s dollars. These are not easy to find, because they aren't really consumer products. What you might want to do is ask a local electrician about installing a whole-house surge protector. I have no idea what that would cost, but I'm sure it can be done. There might also be a discount on homeowner insurance if you did it.