Date   
Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Lyn Quine
 

I have found that bobbins jump around more if I have used a non branded bobbin that fits Brother, Janome and Singer.  Once I bought Janome bobbins I found they fit better, the other bobbins are a different size, hardly notice it, need a micrometer to measure it but it’s enough to cause bounce.

Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

DeeDee Bedard
 

Usually if bobbin is jumping it is because of a rough spot on the case that is catching the thread  Take it out and run your finger around it and feel for rough spots.

Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Pixey
 

In a prior career as an aerospace engineer a couple of decades ago, I sat in on a training program where the instructors were trying to teach gear grinders the reason that vehicle transmissions manufactured in Japan were proving more reliable than those manufactured in the US American autoworker plants.  I learned that part of the manufacturing practices that emerged in Japan out of the post WWII Deming Quality Improvement program was that manufacturers were taught to try and get as close as possible to a target design specification rather than just get it within the design tolerance. Overall, this makes for a tighter, more precise mechanical device.

Pixey



Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Lyn Quine
 

I have the Quiltmaker 15000 upgraded from the 2.11 version, 12000, 350e and a 6600P, I use Schmetz Microtex needles with all of them, have no issues.  I was using a Janome blue tip needle on my 15000 for embroidery, had problems with tension, changed to a schmetz Microtex no problems.  I currently have a schmetz topstitch on it at the moment and no problems with threading or tension.  I’ve not used the Janome needles very often, usually use the Microtex for sewing and embroidery or the topstitch.  I’ve had my machine for around 5 years, and touch wood not had many problems with anything, unless of course I’ve done something silly, which does happen.

Re: Blue bobbin case

Jim Stutsman
 

The bobbin case, yes. As long as it has the little "flipper" for bobbin sensing and cutting, it's fine. However if by "adjustable quilting foot" you mean the Convertible Free Motion Set (202-002-004), no. It's not meant for 9mm machines like the 15000. On that machine you need QB-S (858-820-018).

Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Jim Stutsman
 

I don't think the issue with Schmetz needles is due to length differences. It's more likely due to a difference in the position of the eye and the scarf (dished out place behind the needle). Stitches form as the needle is rising, which causes a loop to push out behind the needle. The hook passes through the scarf of the needle, almost touching it, and grabs that loop. There are mechanical adjustments to optimize this process. The tip of the hook must arrive when the scarf is at its midpoint relative to the hook. There needs to be just enough clearance between the hook and the needle, within the scarf, to prevent contact. Janome uses Organ to manufacture their needles, and almost certainly to calibrate machines before shipping. They tend to adjust things with exceptionally tight tolerances, so minor variations in needle construction could lead to issues with one brand over another. That said, it's also true that a lot of Janome machines (ours included) do just fine with Schmetz needles. I think this could come down to individual workers in assembling the machines having different techniques. Ideally if an adjustment has a range of A to B, you would want to set things to be right in the middle of the range. But if you stop adjusting at the first point within the range, there is less tolerance. With time and use, parts of the machine may change slightly, and then fall outside the range. I think that's why we see things like sensors that suddenly start issuing warnings. If the sensor was set at the very limit of the range, it doesn't take much use to cause it to drift slightly outside. The same could be true for needles. If the machine is set to a point that works for an Organ needle, it's done, ready to ship. This may not be exactly right for a Schmetz needle.

The settings involved in the stitch process are not normally checked by service technicians. If a machine is sewing correctly, they don't go looking for things to adjust (and charge you for). Service training tells them to start every service with a new Janome/Organ needle, size 14. This, in spite of the fact that more sewing is probably done with 11 or 12 needles than 14. This leads to the inevitable needle threader problems, as well as other woes.

Which needles you use is determined mostly by what's available to you. There may be variations in the lifetime of one brand over another, particularly if they involve titanium or chrome plating, but if the world's best needle is not available where you live, it doesn't matter. If you have a brand that is working for you, and you like it, no need to change. If the brand you would like to use isn't working, ask your technician to adjust your machine using that brand, preferably a size 11 or 12 with regard to the threader. He may be reluctant to do this, though less likely if the technician is a she. A plate of brownies might help tilt the scales in your direction.

And never use those Singer needles you find in the grocery or big box "Sewing Center"! They are optimized for profit to the seller.

Blue bobbin case

Diane
 

Can I safely use the blue bobbin case and adjustable quilting foot that I have for my MC6600 on my 15000?  I looked to see if there is a set specifically for the 15000 but couldn't find one.

Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Patricia Ward
 

Connie,I never use Schmetz in my Janome machine for I read in several different places that the Schmetz needles are a tad longer and the Janome machine does not like that.  I am sure that Jim, our guru, could explain what it is that I am referring to..   I save my Schmetz needles  ( oh dear dare I say it?) for my Bernina machine ..... which I rarely use anymore.  

My Janome's really like Organ/Janome needles.  

Pat in MD

On Sun, Nov 17, 2019 at 10:08 AM Connie <sewpicky1@...> wrote:
Pixey,
I have noticed my machine is sensitive to the needle brand!  She definitely likes Organ (Janome) needles over Schmetz.  I dropped her off yesterday for service and I feel confident this will be an easy adjustment.   
Thanks for reply.
Connie S.
On November 15, 2019 at 10:27 AM "Pixey via Groups.Io" <pixeyam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Connie,

Others on this group and another I am on have seen machine sensitivity to different needle brands. I have had some Janome machines that work fine with different brands of needles (including Schmetz ) and others that just get persnickety if I use any needles other than Organ needles (which is the same as Janome branded ones).  Having some knowledge of Japanese manufacturing processes.  I suspect some machines are just built to slightly tighter tolerances.  No one has reported damage to their machine, but more an issue of skipped stitches, uneven tension, etc.

I also sometimes see increased bobbin jumping if I am sewing at faster speeds and the bobbin is getting low.  That is just because it is having to spin faster and faster the lower it gets and sometimes they haven’t wound as smoothly closer to the spindle.

Pixey

 

On Nov 14, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Connie < sewpicky1@...> wrote:

Jim,
Thank you for the photos.  I have checked my bobbin case for rough areas and can't find anything unusual.  The stopper looks normal as well.  I've not had any trouble with nesting or needles  breaking but I do remember one odd thing last month while doing regular sewing.  
In the middle of a project, the bobbin thread wasn't picking up and I had to keep cleaning the bobbin case out/ reseating everything.  After 3 times of doing this I replaced the Schemetz needle I was using with an Organ needle and everything worked smoothly from then on.
Sounds like this might have been the beginning of the problem.  
I have stopped all sewing and will take it in for service.  

Sad part is my dealer/service tech is retiring and closing the store at the end of December.  He is super swamped with repairs and service right now.  This means no Christmas sewing for me.... 

 

Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Connie
 

Pixey,
I have noticed my machine is sensitive to the needle brand!  She definitely likes Organ (Janome) needles over Schmetz.  I dropped her off yesterday for service and I feel confident this will be an easy adjustment.   
Thanks for reply.
Connie S.

On November 15, 2019 at 10:27 AM "Pixey via Groups.Io" <pixeyam@...> wrote:

Connie,

Others on this group and another I am on have seen machine sensitivity to different needle brands. I have had some Janome machines that work fine with different brands of needles (including Schmetz ) and others that just get persnickety if I use any needles other than Organ needles (which is the same as Janome branded ones).  Having some knowledge of Japanese manufacturing processes.  I suspect some machines are just built to slightly tighter tolerances.  No one has reported damage to their machine, but more an issue of skipped stitches, uneven tension, etc.

I also sometimes see increased bobbin jumping if I am sewing at faster speeds and the bobbin is getting low.  That is just because it is having to spin faster and faster the lower it gets and sometimes they haven’t wound as smoothly closer to the spindle.

Pixey

 

On Nov 14, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Connie < sewpicky1@...> wrote:

Jim,
Thank you for the photos.  I have checked my bobbin case for rough areas and can't find anything unusual.  The stopper looks normal as well.  I've not had any trouble with nesting or needles  breaking but I do remember one odd thing last month while doing regular sewing.  
In the middle of a project, the bobbin thread wasn't picking up and I had to keep cleaning the bobbin case out/ reseating everything.  After 3 times of doing this I replaced the Schemetz needle I was using with an Organ needle and everything worked smoothly from then on.
Sounds like this might have been the beginning of the problem.  
I have stopped all sewing and will take it in for service.  

Sad part is my dealer/service tech is retiring and closing the store at the end of December.  He is super swamped with repairs and service right now.  This means no Christmas sewing for me.... 

 

Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Suzanne Martin
 

On Fri, Nov 15, 2019 at 10:58 AM, Pixey wrote:
I am also having this problem with my 15000:     "I also sometimes see increased bobbin jumping if I am sewing at faster speeds and the bobbin is getting low.  That is just because it is having to spin faster and faster the lower it gets and sometimes they haven’t wound as smoothly closer to the spindle."

Re: 15000 skipped stitches on right side only

Sheri-A
 

Jim,
Many, many thanks for all you do and for this assistance.  The problem with my machine was the timing.  I believe I must have been pulling too hard when putting the binding on and I was reminded I have a "hump jumper" in my arsenal of accessories.

I don't know how many other machine owners out there are like me, but I get downright stressed and depressed when my sewing machine gets sick.  I worry that things will never be the same or the cost will be enormous to get her fixed.  When you responded, my stress diminished and I thank you again.

Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Pixey
 

Connie,

Others on this group and another I am on have seen machine sensitivity to different needle brands. I have had some Janome machines that work fine with different brands of needles (including Schmetz ) and others that just get persnickety if I use any needles other than Organ needles (which is the same as Janome branded ones).  Having some knowledge of Japanese manufacturing processes.  I suspect some machines are just built to slightly tighter tolerances.  No one has reported damage to their machine, but more an issue of skipped stitches, uneven tension, etc.

I also sometimes see increased bobbin jumping if I am sewing at faster speeds and the bobbin is getting low.  That is just because it is having to spin faster and faster the lower it gets and sometimes they haven’t wound as smoothly closer to the spindle.

Pixey


On Nov 14, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Connie <sewpicky1@...> wrote:

Jim,
Thank you for the photos.  I have checked my bobbin case for rough areas and can't find anything unusual.  The stopper looks normal as well.  I've not had any trouble with nesting or needles  breaking but I do remember one odd thing last month while doing regular sewing.  
In the middle of a project, the bobbin thread wasn't picking up and I had to keep cleaning the bobbin case out/ reseating everything.  After 3 times of doing this I replaced the Schemetz needle I was using with an Organ needle and everything worked smoothly from then on.
Sounds like this might have been the beginning of the problem.  
I have stopped all sewing and will take it in for service.  

Sad part is my dealer/service tech is retiring and closing the store at the end of December.  He is super swamped with repairs and service right now.  This means no Christmas sewing for me.... 

Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Connie
 

Jim,
Thank you for the photos.  I have checked my bobbin case for rough areas and can't find anything unusual.  The stopper looks normal as well.  I've not had any trouble with nesting or needles  breaking but I do remember one odd thing last month while doing regular sewing.  
In the middle of a project, the bobbin thread wasn't picking up and I had to keep cleaning the bobbin case out/ reseating everything.  After 3 times of doing this I replaced the Schemetz needle I was using with an Organ needle and everything worked smoothly from then on.
Sounds like this might have been the beginning of the problem.  
I have stopped all sewing and will take it in for service.  

Sad part is my dealer/service tech is retiring and closing the store at the end of December.  He is super swamped with repairs and service right now.  This means no Christmas sewing for me.... 

Re: Bobbin Case Jumping

Jim Stutsman
 

Most of the time when the bobbin case starts "jumping" it's because there is damage to the case itself and/or the hook race. Usually this happens as the result of something like a thread nest or a broken needle. As the thread slips under the bobbin case to make a stitch it catches on burrs on the case or the hook race that the case sits in. This causes the thread to catch. Instead of the thread sliding freely, the stitch is held until the thread can pull free from the damaged area. This causes it to pull the bobbin case up. If the damage is not repaired, this will eventually cause the case to pull up past the stopper, which is a small metal spring that the case rests against at about the 5 o'clock position. Once it spins out it usually gets penetrated by the needle and more damage occurs.

Remove the bobbin case and inspect it carefully, top, bottom, and edges. Any roughness will catch the thread. While it's out take a look at the thin metal shelf that it sits on. Use bright light and magnification if you can. Look for pits, notches, scratches, or any sign of damage from a needle strike. I'm attaching a photo of hook race damage, as well one with an arrow pointing to the legendary stopper. If yours looks different from this in any way you need to have the machine serviced.

Bobbin Case Jumping

Connie
 

As of today the bobbin case in my 1500 is very active while embroidering. Everything underneath is clean but when I go to remove a bobbin, the case is so loose it is almost falling out.  A long time ago I remember a discussion about a bobbin stopper inside the machine.  Just curious if this might have failed.

Regards

Re: Oakville seminar

Lorrie Gauthier
 

Maybe it’s both reasons. 😉 I’d like to meet him. I may get there tomorrow afternoon. 


see you soon!

Re: retrieving files through vmware

kathy palma
 

Don't feel bad, Jim.  My kids tell people that when God said "let there be light," their mother threw the switch.  

Kathy in Buffalo

Re: Oakville seminar

Debbie
 

Lorrie. 

Sean is great. He’s either a good businessman or I’m annoying because he knows me well. :)

I also buy everything from him. I’m glad store is local to me. 

Re: threadBook

Mary Mills
 

Thanks Jim, I will see if what charts I have comes out alright otherwise I’ll contact Sava, the owner of the shop to see if he can help.  Re the S9, the owner of the shop said she attended a training session in Sydney where they showed her how to use the AcuSetter app on an S9, it was probably a 15000 she was shown on, she is still learning the machine embroidery field and she asked me if I wanted to learn, of course I said yes!  If she actually succeeds in showing me and connecting my machine I’ll let you know, it won’t be till the first Monday in December when I drive the two hours trip to Young from Wagga Wagga where I live.  Wish I could fly a plane....  I will get back to you, thanks again, love the app and also the FootBook app which I will show to them in Young.  Regards, Mary 

Re: threadBook

Jim Stutsman
 

Thanks for using our app Mary! We continue to add threads almost daily, as we can find them. Those sold only outside the US are a special challenge. In particular, I have been unable to find a color chart or even a photo of your GEM range. There are photos online of the color cards, but they are small and not likely to be accurate. There is a provision within the app to add missing threads. If you happen to have the two color cards and can take a high resolution photo of each, you can send it to onlinesewing @ icloud.com. Photos taken in natural light tend to render the best color fidelity. 

I don’t think I can offer much help with the AcuSetter app. The current version, as installed on my iPad, does not seem to have an option for the S9. This model was added to AcuEdit, and perhaps will feature the S9 in a future update. I would recommend contacting Janome with a request that it be added.