Date   

Re: Janome Mbx

maggie cooper
 

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "jeana_david" <jeana.david@...> wrote:

Hi, thanks to those who replied to my last post,it was very helpful
I have another query,I upgraded to MBX and like it very much but I am confused about the tie off and cut button for selected objects Can you appy this button to the entire design or just selected bits of it?
I assumed that tie offs were automatic if you use the semi auto parts of the software or do you have to use this button? Also what do you select on the 12000, the cutting command or always tie off and cut?Again what is a good length for the jump stitch before this happens?
I hope you can understand what I mean! Jeana
Jeana,the force tie on and offs was included for people who didnt want small jumps, 2mm or less between lettering or objects. MBX will still automatically insert tie stitches between colour changes, jumps longer than 3 needle up commands, that your machines are usually set for to trigger a jump. If you view your design in non simulated stitch mode, you should see a series of triangles and circles. Triangles are tie off stitches, and circles mark tie on stitches. I think you'll find you only need the force tie stitch function on lettering where the distance between the ending of one letter, and the start of the next doesnt show 3 clear what looks like needle penetrations.
Those are the 3 nedle up commands your machine recieves to travel across the gap.
maggiecoops


MBX and Corel question

gbmko
 

I love learning new software, but must admit I don't know the particulars of "How" they work, so here's my question. The MBX has corel draw essentials (which Jim has mentioned does not remove properly if you need to uninstall the program), and I actually own and have Corel Draw graphic suite x5 installed. When I install MBX, will it all be in a seperate "folder", and work as seperate programs, or do I need to do something to make sure they don't "mix" or interefere with each other? Hopefully it won't be an issue, but as I don't know, wanted to ask before installation. Thanks!


Re: . Thread coming out of take up lever

Vikki Youngmeyer
 

Sometimes thread will come out of the take up lever because it somehow got skinned. This usually happens with poor quality thread that has knots or ‘blebs’ in it.

Try a different thread.

 

I’m amazed that people will spend hundreds/thousands of dollars on various types of sewing machines but use poor quality thread that’s 2 for $1 from Walmart or Joann’s. That’s not to say that you may not have a problem with a good quality thread. I’ve taken a couple of King Tut spools back to my dealer and gotten replacements, as it was obviously those particular spools had manufacturing problems.

 

Some spools have “notches” so you can store the thread without it unraveling from the spool and getting tangled. Sometimes the notches are too deep or have a rough spot  such that the way particular machines are threaded, the thread gets caught in the notch as it goes up and down the spool. When it gets caught it may break right there or “skin” on thru to cause problems elsewhere.

 

You can try putting the thread on the thread stand and see if that makes a difference. Sometimes on the horizontal spools, the thread will “roll off” the spool and wrap itself around the spindle. I’ve noticed that embroidery thread is notorious for doing that!

 

Vikki

Houston, TX

 


Re: Cloth Setter

threadships
 

For the cloth setter question, you have completely missed the boat. We all know how to place out fabric IN the hoop and get it centered. Now go try doing the same thing, hooping the stabilizer and applying the fabric on top. We are talking hoopless embroidery. This is frequently required when embroidering a fabric which would be damaged by compressing it in a hoop. The hoop skids all over the table and you have no visible reference marks to tell you where center is. Even a template won't help if you can't line it up in the hoop. The clothsetter solved both problems. Three of my Christmas projects required this type of hooping. It took multiple tries to get the fabric centered close enough to fine tune it with the JOG keys. It was effortless with the clothsetter that I am accustomed to using on my previous Janome machines. A large sheet of skidproof shelfliner on the table helps to stabilize the hoop however.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Julie" <jjems@...> wrote:

For those of you that think you can't center a design without the
clothsetter, I would ask you if you have ever tried lining up your
embroidery by printing out a template and placing that on your project
before lining up in the hoop. It is the same thing as a clothsetter but so
easy and so much less trouble than using a clothsetter.



If Janome does come out with a cloth setter for the 12k machine I won't be
buying it because it's really not necessary, plus, a clothsetter for the 12k
machine would have to be huge and the price to fit that.



If you started with Janome and either an 8000 or 9000 machine back in the
90's there was no other way to line up embroidery other than the clothsetter
because those machines for some reason did not start with the designs
centered. After Janome figured it out and realized with later machines that
having the machine start with the design in the center was important, then a
clothsetter was just an extra accessory that really wasn't necessary.



Julie in TX


. Thread coming out of take up lever

Linda Spector <lmsoriginals1@...>
 

I've had the same happen, randomly.  I can't seem to discover what the secret is either.  Any ideas?   btw, I LOVE MY MACHINE!!
 
Linda


Using the Binder

Julie
 

I had a chance to try out the Quilt Binder set with the 12k yesterday and was extremely happy with the result.  I did use the foot that came with the kit, attaching it to the 11k ankle that I purchased so I could use all of my old 7700 and 11k feet. 

 

I was even successful turning corners.  The challenge was in trying to figure out how wide to cut the binding.  My fabric was thinner than I really wanted to use, but all I had in the right color.  Because the fabric was a thin cotton, it needed to be cut wider than a thicker cotton.  I tried 1 7/8” to start with and it was awful.  Then I tried 2” and it was still a problem not having enough to turn under.  I ended up with 2 ¼” wide and still had to watch to be sure that it was turning over where it should turn over. 

 

I did this binding around 2 baby quilts using a straight stitch on the machine and it caught both sides of the quilt – this video will show you how to do it from start to finish.  There is also another video that someone posted the other day that shows you how to attach the binder.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShT0VQ3BIUM&feature=related

 

Julie in TX


Re: Cloth Setter

Julie
 

For those of you that think you can’t center a design without the clothsetter, I would ask you if you have ever tried lining up your embroidery by printing out a template and placing that on your project before lining up in the hoop.  It is the same thing as a clothsetter but so easy and so much less trouble than using a clothsetter. 

 

If Janome does come out with a cloth setter for the 12k machine I won’t be buying it because it’s really not necessary, plus, a clothsetter for the 12k machine would have to be huge and the price to fit that.  

 

If you started with Janome and either an 8000 or 9000 machine back in the 90’s there was no other way to line up embroidery other than the clothsetter because those machines for some reason did not start with the designs centered.  After Janome figured it out and realized with later machines that having the machine start with the design in the center was important, then a clothsetter was just an extra accessory that really wasn’t necessary.

 

Julie in TX


Re: reply I got back from Janome re: smaller hoops

Sherry Martin
 

I also emailed them a few weeks ago. I just got a reply that my email had been forwarded to the 12000 group. At least we know they read their emails. I guess we just have to keep sending them if there are accessories that we would like to have.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "seamgood" <seamgood@...> wrote:

Good morning All!
Well, I wrote to Janome via their website and asked them to please consider making a 4x4 and 5x7 hoop for the 12000, thanking them for making the larger hoops available to those that wanted them so badly, but that the 4x4 and 5x7 hoops were just as important to us. This is their reply back to me. At least we know they do read their emails. lol
Here is their response:

"Dear Gloria,
We do not know what hoops will be available in the future. We will be happy to share your comments with the rest of our staff.


Thank you for your inquiry.
Customer Relations
Janome America, Inc."

Just wanted you all to know. Happy sewing!
Gloria in MA


reply I got back from Janome re: smaller hoops

seamgood <seamgood@...>
 

Good morning All!
Well, I wrote to Janome via their website and asked them to please consider making a 4x4 and 5x7 hoop for the 12000, thanking them for making the larger hoops available to those that wanted them so badly, but that the 4x4 and 5x7 hoops were just as important to us. This is their reply back to me. At least we know they do read their emails. lol
Here is their response:

"Dear Gloria,
We do not know what hoops will be available in the future. We will be happy to share your comments with the rest of our staff.


Thank you for your inquiry.
Customer Relations
Janome America, Inc."

Just wanted you all to know. Happy sewing!
Gloria in MA


Re: Thread coming out of take up lever

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

The thread may not be getting into the take-up lever in the first place. Often new owners are trying to be extra careful with their "new baby" and they are very gentle when threading. If you open the door at the left end of the machine, you'll see that there is a small clip next to the eye on the lever. If the thread doesn't get pulled into the eye past the clip, it will eventually slip off. Keep the door open while threading and watch, until you get used to the sound and feel of the little "click" when the thread goes in past the clip.

If you are sure you've gotten it threaded correctly, check that clip and make sure that it's there and not bent or damaged. In that case, or if you are unable to see a clear cause of the problem, have your dealer take a look at it. This is definitely not a normal event. In 25 years as a dealer, I could recognize the sound of a "thread-out-of-take-up-lever" event from 100 feet away, when it happened in a class. Diane runs her machine flat out all the time, regarding the foot control as more of an On/Off switch. I've not heard the noise once since we got the 12000.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "dkuhlman4891" <dkuhlman4891@...> wrote:

Hi Group,
I did my first hard core quilt piecing on my 12000 this weekend. I really struggled keeping the thread in the take up lever between seams. I tried using the thread cutter, not using the thread cutter, but I cannot seem to figure out what is making it thread constantly come out of the take up lever. Has anyone seen this behavior. Any advice would be welcomed.
Thanks,
Donna


Re: Janome Mbx

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

The "Always Tie-Off & Trim" tool applies to objects that are close to one another. Lettering is the area that it most often applies to. When you create a lettering object, Digitizer MBX will insert tie-off and trim codes between the letters automatically. When bridging between the letters, it will always pick the shortest distance between each pair of letters. Sometimes this results in very short (3mm or less) stitches between two letters. Normally those stitches are left as they are, without tie-off or trim, because they are small enough that they won't show. However there may be times when you don't want those short stitches in there at all, perhaps when doing white lettering on black fabric. By selecting the lettering and applying the tool, you can make sure that each letter is tied off and the thread is trimmed before going to the next letter. This option is important if you (or the recipient of the embroidery) decides to cut the connecting threads that are left. If the Tie-Off & Trim option was NOT turned on, the objects on both sides of the cut stitch can ravel.

This also applies when you are digitizing individual objects yourself. For example, if you digitize a string of pearls, with many circles being placed close to one another, there might be short connectors that are left between each pair of circles. Using this option will cause them to be trimmed instead of left untouched.

You might wonder why they just don't tie-off and trim between every object. That gets back to the roots of Digitizer MBX, which is a program created for commercial embroidery. In the commercial world, your profit is directly related to how fast you can stitch out an embroidery. On a commercial machine every time you do a tie-off and trim in the design, it takes as long as 100 stitches. The more of those you can eliminate from a design, the faster it will stitch, so Digitizer by default will try to skip them when it can, unless you force the issue using the tool.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "jeana_david" <jeana.david@...> wrote:

Hi, thanks to those who replied to my last post,it was very helpful
I have another query,I upgraded to MBX and like it very much but I am confused about the tie off and cut button for selected objects Can you appy this button to the entire design or just selected bits of it?
I assumed that tie offs were automatic if you use the semi auto parts of the software or do you have to use this button? Also what do you select on the 12000, the cutting command or always tie off and cut?Again what is a good length for the jump stitch before this happens?
I hope you can understand what I mean! Jeana


Re: Thread coming out of take up lever

Anne <csarina43@...>
 

I had a similar problem with my 11000, but not with the 12000 are you sure you are getting the thread right in the front of the hook when you thread it???


Re: Bobbin cover

Anne <csarina43@...>
 

Thanks, I have ordered a second one to save my hair, it was getting a bit thin!!


Thread coming out of take up lever

dkuhlman4891
 

Hi Group,
I did my first hard core quilt piecing on my 12000 this weekend. I really struggled keeping the thread in the take up lever between seams. I tried using the thread cutter, not using the thread cutter, but I cannot seem to figure out what is making it thread constantly come out of the take up lever. Has anyone seen this behavior. Any advice would be welcomed.
Thanks,
Donna


Janome Mbx

Jeana David
 

Hi, thanks to those who replied to my last post,it was very helpful
I have another query,I upgraded to MBX and like it very much but I am confused about the tie off and cut button for selected objects Can you appy this button to the entire design or just selected bits of it?
I assumed that tie offs were automatic if you use the semi auto parts of the software or do you have to use this button? Also what do you select on the 12000, the cutting command or always tie off and cut?Again what is a good length for the jump stitch before this happens?
I hope you can understand what I mean! Jeana


Re: Cloth Setter

Bea Rosier <bearosier@...>
 

I think you will all miss a great machine.  I purchased the 12000 in November, and I like it better than any of the others, and I still own the MC11000, as well as the MB4.  The MB4 has never had a cloth setter, and I haven’t had any trouble aligning my designs;  I rarely used the cloth setter with the MC11000 because it seemed to be too much trouble to get out that table just to use the cloth setter.  At that time, I also owned the MC6600 so I was using that table and didn’t have room for both of them.

I purchased the 7700  and traded it in on the MC12000 because it does everything and more than the 7700 did. 

Of course, you’ll do what you want, but I think you’re missing a great machine of you choose not to buy it because of the cloth setter.

 


Re: Cloth Setter

Helen Brown
 

I will wait until they have a cloth setter before I buy a 12000. I use the 11000 cloth setter for all that I do.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 29, 2012, at 10:04 AM, "Marsha Lemmons" <hobbied1@...> wrote:

 

I agree, Nettie!  I went to the Janome site & filled out a request for one.  I can use the templates & crosshairs for most things but for very precise placement of the fabric on a multi-part large format picture design, nothing beats the clothsetter.  I don't know if I would have bought this machine if I had known they weren't going to have one.  So, my fingers are crossed that eventually they'll do one. 
 
Marsha


Re: Bobbin cover

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Also the covers for the 6500, 6600, 7700, and 11000.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, vicki chrobak <tulsajo1@...> wrote:

The cover for the 6300P fits the 12000.

--
Vicki Jo


Re: Bobbin cover

theagedpage@...
 

It does fit - last week I bought one at my dealer and it was only $3. You would have thought for $3 Janome would have included one on each plate just so customers would be happy...it was annoying having to change it with each plate.
Linda Lee


---- Anne <csarina43@gmail.com> wrote:
Does anyone know if the bobbin case cover for the 11000 also fits the 12000? Several times I have taken off the needle plate and then realised I have left the cover on. Solution get another bobbin cover. I have seen bobbin covers on E bay so I guess you can get them.


Re: Bobbin cover

vicki chrobak
 

The cover for the 6300P fits the 12000.

--
Vicki Jo