Date   

Re: hoop sizes

janetpiekarski
 

I agree that we really should have a 5 X 7 hoop but I have to lauch because fairly recently, the battle cry was "The hoops are too SMALL!" Poor Janome, they made us bigger hoops and now we're crying for smaller ones. 4 X 4, really? Who would have thought we'd be asking for that!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Vikki Youngmeyer" <vikkiy@...> wrote:

The Lunch Box quilt I'm working on had numerous blocks with
embroidered/appliqué birds. There were three block sizes – 3 ½ x 6 ½, 6 ½ x
9 ½ and 3½ x 3 ½ inches respectively.



I cut two strips – width of fabric that were wide enough to be hooped by the
small and medium sized hoops. I hooped the fabric so that the remaining
strip was to the left of the machine. I then folded it up and pinned it so
that it wouldn't get caught on the machine. I was able to do multiple passes
of the birds in one hooping by moving the design using the grid and outline
feature. I was able to place the designs so that when I cut them apart I had
sufficient fabric to maintain the block size without having a lot of extra
fabric. Then I would unroll the fabric and start over with a second hooping
and so on. I had a leftover piece from the larger hoop which I was able to
use in the smaller hoop for another design. The leftover pieces from the
smaller hoop were large enough to be cut down into the filler blocks
required by this quilt.



It takes a bit of planning and some basic math skills. Out of 20+ designs,
one is close on the seam allowance, so I may have to do that one over.



Vikki

Houston, TX


Re: Don't lie to your 12000

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Each hoop has a small "margin" around the stitching area. This is sort of like the median in a divided highway. You don't drive there, but it adds a bit of safety to keep the cars a little further apart. What they are doing is telling the machine they are using a larger hoop, then placing designs so that they extend into this margin. You have to be super careful not to put them too far in, or the machine will hit the hoop and big trouble ensues. I am NOT giving this "technique" my seal of approval!

You are right about the hoops. Janome can add more hoops at will, and only change the software to support them. What's frustrating is that every embroidery machine prior to this one has had a 5 x 7 hoop. On the 11000 that hoop was added only after a tremendous outcry from users, but it WAS added. Why did they bring out the 12000 without this hoop? One possible clue - the internal model number of the 11000 is 860, while the 12000 is 859. That suggests that the 12000 may have been in development before the 11000, and thus they did not plan for a 5 x 7 hoop. There were probably different teams working on each model, and they may not have exchanged much information with regard to what users want. I'm sure that, given enough screaming from us, Janome will add a 5 x 7 at minimum, and maybe even a 4 x 4.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "gbmko" <gbmko@...> wrote:

I'm still new enough at this to be confused. If you just put your design in a "bigger" hoop on the screen, for maximizing placement, and then select the correct hoop for the actual embroidering, will the machine tell you if you made the design too large, and to pick a bigger hoop? Or will you only know by doing the non sew outline feature?

Also, I didn't understand the one comment someone made about not buying the machine if you couldn't upgrade hoops (or something like that). If the machine itself doesn't have a sensor, isn't it just a matter of the software being updated to recognize a new hoop, putting a design in that, and the software telling the embroidery unit what to do for the non sew outline? Obviously, we must be able to use new hoops that Janome comes out with if we are asking for a 5x7...we're not limited to just the "original hoops", correct? Barbara Jean

Sorry for not understanding the mechanics behind all of what is being discussed! Please educate me. thanks Barbara Jean


Re: Don't lie to your 12000

gbmko
 

I'm still new enough at this to be confused. If you just put your design in a "bigger" hoop on the screen, for maximizing placement, and then select the correct hoop for the actual embroidering, will the machine tell you if you made the design too large, and to pick a bigger hoop? Or will you only know by doing the non sew outline feature?

Also, I didn't understand the one comment someone made about not buying the machine if you couldn't upgrade hoops (or something like that). If the machine itself doesn't have a sensor, isn't it just a matter of the software being updated to recognize a new hoop, putting a design in that, and the software telling the embroidery unit what to do for the non sew outline? Obviously, we must be able to use new hoops that Janome comes out with if we are asking for a 5x7...we're not limited to just the "original hoops", correct? Barbara Jean

Sorry for not understanding the mechanics behind all of what is being discussed! Please educate me. thanks Barbara Jean

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "pinguin60@..." <pinguin60@...> wrote:

Hello Vikki,
you don't need to lie to do what you did.

After selecting a design that needs a certain size of hoop, you go to
the placement screen and just select another size of hoop (usually bigger)

With the help of the grid, you can place the design wherever you want.

I used that a lot while sewing out some smaller designs, I just forgot
to take the plastic grid away once, so now I have one hole from the
needle in it...

Gerda

PS
By reading your message again I think that is what you did, but as long
as the machine is told what hoop it is working with I don't call it lying

Op 27-01-12 00:57, Vikki Youngmeyer schreef:

That's cool! I did that years ago with my 350e, but had forgotten
about that little tip! Thanks!

Another thing I have found is to "lie" to your 12000! You can select
any of the hoop sizes no matter which one is attached and play around
with the placement of the embroidery. For example, I am doing a Lunch
Box quilt with the birds for a sample at work. It needed 16 eggs each
on its own 3.5" square. Instead of selecting the 12 x 12 hoop, I
selected the next size up and was able to place the eggs as if it was
on the larger hoop. I was able to test out each one before stitching
it using the non-sew outline feature and placing it according on the
grid. That way I made sure I had enough ro


Re: You Need To-----Hoops

Julie
 

I thought Janome learned after customers were unhappy not having a 5x7 hoop for the 11k machine – and only through complaints did they come out with one.  Here we are again having to do the same thing.  It’s a big jump from 5x5 to 8x8 in the use of stabilizer.  When I have to do a design that easily fits in a 5x7 hoop, then I go to one of my other brand embroidery machines instead.  It’s a shame that I have to do that.  I will fill out the form to Janome and hope everyone else does that too.  I don’t expect them to give us the 5x7 for free, but it sure would be nice if they would at least discount it.  LOL

 

Julie


Re: hoop sizes

Vikki Youngmeyer
 

The Lunch Box quilt I’m working on had numerous blocks with embroidered/appliqué birds. There were three block sizes – 3 ½ x 6 ½, 6 ½ x 9 ½ and 3½  x 3 ½  inches respectively.

 

I cut two strips – width of fabric that were wide enough to be hooped by the small and medium sized hoops. I hooped the fabric so that the remaining strip was to the left of the machine. I then folded it up and pinned it so that it wouldn’t get caught on the machine. I was able to do multiple passes of the birds in one hooping by moving the design using the grid and outline feature. I was able to place the designs so that when I cut them apart I had sufficient fabric to maintain the block size without having a lot of extra fabric. Then I would unroll the fabric and start over with a second hooping and so on. I had a leftover piece from the larger hoop which I was able to use in the smaller hoop for another design. The leftover pieces from the smaller hoop were large enough to be cut down into the filler blocks required by this quilt.

 

It takes a bit of planning and some basic math skills. Out of 20+ designs, one is close on the seam allowance, so I may have to do that one over.  

 

Vikki

Houston, TX

 


Don't lie to your 12000

Pinguin
 

Hello Vikki,
you don't need to lie to do what you did.

After selecting a design that needs a certain size of hoop, you go to the placement screen and just select another size of hoop (usually bigger)

With the help of the grid, you can place the design wherever you want.

I used that a lot while sewing out some smaller designs, I just forgot to take the plastic grid away once, so now I have one hole from the needle in it...

Gerda

PS
By reading your message again I think that is what you did, but as long as the machine is told what hoop it is working with I don't call it lying

Op 27-01-12 00:57, Vikki Youngmeyer schreef:

 

That’s cool! I did that years ago with my 350e, but had forgotten about that little tip! Thanks!

 

Another thing I have found is to “lie” to your 12000! You can select any of the hoop sizes no matter which one is attached and play around with the placement of the embroidery. For example, I am doing a Lunch Box quilt with the birds for a sample at work. It needed 16 eggs each on its own 3.5” square. Instead of selecting the 12 x 12  hoop, I selected the next size up and was able to place the eggs as if it was on the larger hoop. I was able to test out each one before stitching it using the non-sew outline feature and placing it according on the grid. That way I made sure I had enough ro


Re: hoop sizes

Liz
 

It's not only the stablizer , I sew pieces together also but one can't sew bits of fabric together. My other TOL machine has updates for new size hoops. I would not have bought the 12000 if I thought we were only limited to the original hoops.Liz

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Vikki Youngmeyer" <vikkiy@...> wrote:

Regarding stabilizer, I've been stitching pieces together to make them large
enough to be hooped by the larger hoops.


Re: Stabiliser wastage

vicki chrobak
 

Vikki, FYI, I had the wrong hoop selected once (should have been a larger one selected) & the very 1st stitch came down right on the hoop.  Talk about a coronary!!! I wish there had been a sensor to protect me from my stupid moment.  Luckily, I hit the stop button before damage was done.
-- 
Vicki Jo

hat’s cool! I did that years ago with my 350e, but had forgotten about that little tip! Thanks!

 

Another thing I have found is to “lie” to your 12000! You can select any of the hoop sizes no matter which one is attached and play around with the placement of the embroidery. For example, I am doing a Lunch Box quilt with the birds for a sample at work. It needed 16 eggs each on its own 3.5” square. Instead of selecting the 12 x 12  hoop, I selected the next size up and was able to place the eggs as if it was on the larger hoop. I was able to test out each one before stitching it using the non-sew outline feature and placing it according on the grid. That way I made sure I had enough room between the previous eggs and didn’t run into the hoops.

 

Vikki

Houston, TX


  


Re: Stabilizer wastage-1 solution I use

vicki chrobak
 

I must give credit to another lady (Lotta) in a Husqvarna group for this. I'm on that group because I also have a Ruby.
For the SQ14 hoop,
1. I ironed a piece of muslin (12 3/4" x 12 1/2") to the same size iron-on heavy duty interfacing (the kind used for window shades). The outside dimension doesn't have to be that precise but it has to be able to be hooped.
2. Then I marked the center lines (vertical & horizontal). Next, I marked "TOP" on one end.
3. Next, mark the inside edge of your hoop with the top of the hoop 2 3/4" from the "TOP" that was previously marked. Center between left & right side of fabric.
4. Inside the marked hoop line, come down 1" & make a horizontal line between the hoop line edges.
5. Inside the marked hoop line, left side, make a vertical line 1/2" to the right of the left hoop line.
6. " " " " ", right side, " " " " 3/4" to the left of the right hoop line.
7. Inside the Marked hoop line, bottom, Make a horizontal line 1/2 " above the hoop line.
8. You should now have about 5 1/2" x 5 3/8 "square marked inside the hoop line. Cut the square & discard or save. You no longer need it. This is the area that the hoop allows for stitching.
9. After cutting out square, zigzag the edges with small zagzag stitch.
10. Zigzag outer edges of you muslin base.
11. Now cut a piece of stabilizer slightly larger than inside hoop lines.
12. Apply water-soluble glue stick between cut-out square & slightly beyond hoop lines.
13. Attach stabilizer to the back side of your muslin piece & iron dry.
14. Hoop project using the hoop markings, making sure the TOP is at the top.
15. You should be able to reuse many times just by replacing the small piece of stabilizer. It is also baste-able outside the hoop area since you have the muslin there.

--
Vicki Jo

I don't know if this is a good idea or not, because I know people think
that sticky stabilizer gums up the machine, but I have been using sticky
stabilizer and then cutting my fabric just a little larger than I want
the finished project to be and sticking it down on the stabilizer. I
recently did 9 applique hearts for a wall hanging. The hearts were
about 3.5 x 3.5 and fabric about 6 x6 to be cut down to 4.5 x 4.5. I
found I could pull off a finished heart, and then cut enough stabilizer
to cover the hole left with a little extra to stick down onto the sticky
part left in the hoop, then cover that with new fabric. I did all 9
hearts without re-hooping any more stabilizer.


Re: Stabiliser wastage

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Didn't your mother ever tell you that lying could get you in trouble? You need to be VERY careful about fudging on the hoop size. If the foot hits the hoop, even if the needle doesn't, it can nudge the hoop holding bracket out of position. After that things may not stitch straight.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Vikki Youngmeyer" <vikkiy@...> wrote:

That's cool! I did that years ago with my 350e, but had forgotten about that
little tip! Thanks!



Another thing I have found is to "lie" to your 12000! You can select any of
the hoop sizes no matter which one is attached and play around with the
placement of the embroidery. For example, I am doing a Lunch Box quilt with
the birds for a sample at work. It needed 16 eggs each on its own 3.5"
square. Instead of selecting the 12 x 12 hoop, I selected the next size up
and was able to place the eggs as if it was on the larger hoop. I was able
to test out each one before stitching it using the non-sew outline feature
and placing it according on the grid. That way I made sure I had enough room
between the previous eggs and didn't run into the hoops.



Vikki

Houston, TX


Re: Stabiliser wastage

Vikki Youngmeyer
 

That’s cool! I did that years ago with my 350e, but had forgotten about that little tip! Thanks!

 

Another thing I have found is to “lie” to your 12000! You can select any of the hoop sizes no matter which one is attached and play around with the placement of the embroidery. For example, I am doing a Lunch Box quilt with the birds for a sample at work. It needed 16 eggs each on its own 3.5” square. Instead of selecting the 12 x 12  hoop, I selected the next size up and was able to place the eggs as if it was on the larger hoop. I was able to test out each one before stitching it using the non-sew outline feature and placing it according on the grid. That way I made sure I had enough room between the previous eggs and didn’t run into the hoops.

 

Vikki

Houston, TX

 


Stitch in Ditch Foot

Sherry Martin
 

I just used the stitch in ditch foot that goes on the acu feed foot for the 1st time. I REALLY liked it. I've used stich-in-ditch feet before but never had a machine where I could use the stitch in ditch foot and a walking foot together. I always had trouble actually staying in the ditch and would end up "ditching" the stitch in ditch foot and just using the walking foot or a clear foot where I could see the needle easily. Although it wasn't perfect, it was by far the best job I've ever done.


Re: Stabiliser wastage

Sherry Martin
 

I don't know if this is a good idea or not, because I know people think that sticky stabilizer gums up the machine, but I have been using sticky stabilizer and then cutting my fabric just a little larger than I want the finished project to be and sticking it down on the stabilizer. I recently did 9 applique hearts for a wall hanging. The hearts were about 3.5 x 3.5 and fabric about 6 x6 to be cut down to 4.5 x 4.5. I found I could pull off a finished heart, and then cut enough stabilizer to cover the hole left with a little extra to stick down onto the sticky part left in the hoop, then cover that with new fabric. I did all 9 hearts without re-hooping any more stabilizer.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "stitchnpatch" <stitchnpatch@...> wrote:

Hi - I too hate wasting stabiliser, fabric, thread... and quickly realised that the 12000 hoops could waste a lot of stabiliser and fabric so this is what I do. I have managed to buy stabiliser by the metre which is 90cms wide - I then cut it about an inch wider than the hoops but leave it as a long piece (5 metres) and unfold the amount I need to hoop the project. I can then cut off the used piece once I have stitche out the design and keep the excess, about 5-6" for use if I need a bit extra stabiliser (I'm getting quite a pile). Then I can unfold the stabiliser a bit for the next project and have only wasted a small piece. I do a similar thing with the fabric by hooping a large piece of fabric, stitch out the design in the corner and trim nearer the embroidery or I pin/stick a smaller piece of fabric on top of the stabiliser instead of hooping it, I always use the basting stitch so it is quite secure.

Personally I love the square hoops and am happy to work round the size of fabric and stabiliser needed.

Vicki in the UK


Stabiliser wastage

stitchnpatch
 

Hi - I too hate wasting stabiliser, fabric, thread... and quickly realised that the 12000 hoops could waste a lot of stabiliser and fabric so this is what I do. I have managed to buy stabiliser by the metre which is 90cms wide - I then cut it about an inch wider than the hoops but leave it as a long piece (5 metres) and unfold the amount I need to hoop the project. I can then cut off the used piece once I have stitche out the design and keep the excess, about 5-6" for use if I need a bit extra stabiliser (I'm getting quite a pile). Then I can unfold the stabiliser a bit for the next project and have only wasted a small piece. I do a similar thing with the fabric by hooping a large piece of fabric, stitch out the design in the corner and trim nearer the embroidery or I pin/stick a smaller piece of fabric on top of the stabiliser instead of hooping it, I always use the basting stitch so it is quite secure.

Personally I love the square hoops and am happy to work round the size of fabric and stabiliser needed.

Vicki in the UK


Re: Digitizer Jr.

vicki chrobak
 

I just bought Digitizer Jr. 4.0 & it has the 12000. Butt haven't played with it much otherwise.

--
Vicki Jo

Just wondering how many of you that have the Digitizer Jr. have upgraded
to MBX? I haven't had my machine long enough to even think about using
either. But I have been told that with some of the embrodery designs
that use the larger hoops this is the way to get them to download since
the programs don't recognize that the 12000 has the larger hoops.

elainesjosiegirl


Changing topics in mid-stream

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

The thread below was originally posted as:
Re: question about adjustable zipper foot

What happened? Well a post went up mentioning a zipper foot AND waiting for a cabinet. A response was posted to the cabinet comment, BUT the subject was left the same. To avoid confusion, when replying to a post with something that is not related to the subject, just enter a new subject so that anyone trying to follow the thread won't get lost in the wilderness. It's cold out there, and there could even be bears! Change the topic, and they'll be home in time for supper, unless it's leftovers.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, Maria Boyle <maruka1@...> wrote:

Hello Sent From My IPhone,


Oooooo you have an iPhone. And I have an iPad. LOL

I'm confused....the subject line says re: question about adjustable zipper foot. And you are talking about something totally different.



Sent from my iPad


On Jan 26, 2012, at 10:31 AM, Judy <judyjanome@...> wrote:

I have on order 3 weeks now a Sew Perfect table and I ordered 2 inserts, one which is for when I drop machine down and the other is a flush mount for when the the machine is on top of the table. It is not a air drop like the Horn table is, I have one for my Viking Diamond however did not want to open up the wallet that far. Web page is sewperfect and owner is from Maine. Also lots of accessories to choose from. Mine should be here this week. Owner had a Janome 12000 set up in this cabinet and used it to demo in his shop.

Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: question about adjustable zipper foot

Maria Boyle
 

Hello Sent From My IPhone,


Oooooo you have an iPhone. And I have an iPad. LOL

I'm confused....the subject line says re: question about adjustable zipper foot. And you are talking about something totally different.



Sent from my iPad

On Jan 26, 2012, at 10:31 AM, Judy <judyjanome@yahoo.com> wrote:

I have on order 3 weeks now a Sew Perfect table and I ordered 2 inserts, one which is for when I drop machine down and the other is a flush mount for when the the machine is on top of the table. It is not a air drop like the Horn table is, I have one for my Viking Diamond however did not want to open up the wallet that far. Web page is sewperfect and owner is from Maine. Also lots of accessories to choose from. Mine should be here this week. Owner had a Janome 12000 set up in this cabinet and used it to demo in his shop.

Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: question about adjustable zipper foot

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

The high shank adjustable narrow zipper foot works great with the 12000. It's part #200334002. You can adjust it as needed, and it's just a tad bit narrower than the zipper foot E included with your machine.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "seamgood" <seamgood@...> wrote:

Good morning sewing friends!
Well, I made a zippered accessory bag last night as my first project. I like to do that for any new machine I get, to keep all the "stuff" in so it doesn't get lost. I also embroidered the Janome 12000 name on the front. It came out awesome, sewed like a hot knife through butter, and putting the zipper on was not too bad, considering I am not a fan of the zipper foot they gave us. I just love the adjustable zipper foot I've used on all my machines and wonder if they will be making one for the 12000? I have 2 and tried them on the 12000 but they do not fit. It is the kind that you need to loosen the screw and the foot has the claw that hugs the needle bar and then you tighten the screw. It has the little green screw to adjust the position of the foot...it slides right or left. Jim, if you are familiar with this foot..it is a generic one, any idea why it wouldn't fit? It worked on the 11000.
Also, what are you ladies using for tables for your 12000? Right now, I have mine on the 6500/6600 table, just sitting ontop of the table. Even with the embroidery unit on, it fits nicely, but I just have to pull it out from the wall to embroider. It's kind of heavy and on top of carpeting, it's a bit difficult to lift alone. Wonder if they will be making a table eventually. Oh, so many questions and wonderments!lol

But, so far, I am totally smitten!
Happy sewing.
Gloria


Re: Digitizer Jr.

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Version 4 of Digitizer Junior (the latest) supports all of the 12000 hoops. If you have a design from a non-Janome digitizer you can open it with Digitizer Junior and send it to the USB drive or the 12000. It will assign the selected hoop and convert it to Janome format during the process. Of course Digitizer MBX does all this and MUCH, MUCH more, but if all you are looking for is the ability to convert, and potentially resize, designs, Junior will do a good job for you.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "elainesjosiegirl" <elainekaiser@...> wrote:

Just wondering how many of you that have the Digitizer Jr. have upgraded to MBX? I haven't had my machine long enough to even think about using either. But I have been told that with some of the embrodery designs that use the larger hoops this is the way to get them to download since the programs don't recognize that the 12000 has the larger hoops.
elainesjosiegirl


Re: question about adjustable zipper foot

Judy <judyjanome@...>
 

I have on order 3 weeks now a Sew Perfect table and I ordered 2 inserts, one which is for when I drop machine down and the other is a flush mount for when the the machine is on top of the table. It is not a air drop like the Horn table is, I have one for my Viking Diamond however did not want to open up the wallet that far. Web page is sewperfect and owner is from Maine. Also lots of accessories to choose from. Mine should be here this week. Owner had a Janome 12000 set up in this cabinet and used it to demo in his shop.

Sent from my iPhone