Date   

Re: Design Formats in AcuDesign

Deb Keldrauk
 

Jim,
Did I hear you say NEW iPad app??? 
Do tell.
Deb in CA

[Shhhh! It's still under wraps!]
We've been working on it for nearly a year, starting with a very simple idea that has morphed into a very large project. So large that I've spent the past week just refining the graphics and Diane has been working on video for more than a month. Stay tuned!


New App

guequies@...
 

Jim,


I have no idea what your new app is but your teasers are really getting me excited.  I can't wait to buy it whatever it is.  Any idea of when it will be released?


Sherry


[What's App?]

We're in alpha testing now, which is basically where we look for show-stopping bugs. I'm hopeful that we'll be in beta testing by next week, and submission to the App Store by month end. Apple will be announcing the release of iOS 10 tomorrow, which will lead to a flood of apps hitting the store for approval, so that could delay things. This is probably the biggest app I've ever written, including my pre-sewing days from 1978 to 1990. Stay tuned.


Re: Design Formats in AcuDesign

darlene Reese
 

If you go to Safari, you can find a free program called Airstitch to download.  You cN send your file there, then convert them and send them back where you want them.
Try it
Darlene 

Sent from my iPad

On Sep 5, 2016, at 8:57 AM, capaul@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Good Morning Jim Diane,


I saved some files to Dropbox yesterday to open in AcuDesign.  I think the problem is that I sent the to a USB from Digitizer V5 and they saved as JPX JBX files - am I correct in my assumption.


Next question:  How do we get Janome, Artistic, and other software companies to get their act together and make the design files compatible? - Like WHO do we ask?  It isn't a problem saving as a JEF for example, but I do have a problem with Janome in not making that the file that is automatically saved, so that it can be used elsewhere.  Our sewing machines make the change when we connect the USB.  It would make life much simpler for the end user, especially those who have absolutely no computer training of any sort.  I have a bit of training although it is getting older as each year goes by - so I can sometimes establish what is wrong before asking HOW to fix it.


Thank you.


Cheryl - Saskatoon


[Technology marches on (us) with heavy boots!]

The problem is that as machines get more and more capable Janome needs more data in the design file. Consider the original SEW format, which was severely constrained by colors, size and stitch count. JEF fixed that, but they the 11000 needed more data so that spawned JEF+. Then came the 12000 which added JPX. (Aside - JBX is actually just a thumbnail image used by the machine itself, so it can be ignored.)


Brother has the same problem, which they solved with PES by making different versions. That creates a different problem for people who have what appears to be a valid PES file, but it won't open in their software that doesn't support that version.


Adding JPX to AcuDesign would be done by Wings Software, who modified their DRAWings SNAP app for Janome. However they won't do it without being paid, so it falls on Janome to make the call. I don't really know whether Janome has a lot of AcuDesign users, so I don't know whether a lot of user feedback would accomplish anything. I truly hope that lots of people are using iPads because we have invested a LOT (Huuuuuuuuuuugggggge in Trump-speak) amount of time on a new iPad app! For now I would address this with Liz of the Janome Life blog. She's highly regarded by Janome and could have some influence.


Design Formats in AcuDesign

Cheryl Paul
 

Good Morning Jim & Diane,


I saved some files to Dropbox yesterday to open in AcuDesign.  I think the problem is that I sent the to a USB from Digitizer V5 and they saved as JPX & JBX files - am I correct in my assumption.


Next question:  How do we get Janome, Artistic, and other software companies to get their act together and make the design files compatible? - Like WHO do we ask?  It isn't a problem saving as a JEF for example, but I do have a problem with Janome in not making that the file that is automatically saved, so that it can be used elsewhere.  Our sewing machines make the change when we connect the USB.  It would make life much simpler for the end user, especially those who have absolutely no computer training of any sort.  I have a bit of training although it is getting older as each year goes by - so I can sometimes establish what is wrong before asking HOW to fix it.


Thank you.


Cheryl - Saskatoon


[Technology marches on (us) with heavy boots!]

The problem is that as machines get more and more capable Janome needs more data in the design file. Consider the original SEW format, which was severely constrained by colors, size and stitch count. JEF fixed that, but they the 11000 needed more data so that spawned JEF+. Then came the 12000 which added JPX. (Aside - JBX is actually just a thumbnail image used by the machine itself, so it can be ignored.)


Brother has the same problem, which they solved with PES by making different versions. That creates a different problem for people who have what appears to be a valid PES file, but it won't open in their software that doesn't support that version.


Adding JPX to AcuDesign would be done by Wings Software, who modified their DRAWings SNAP app for Janome. However they won't do it without being paid, so it falls on Janome to make the call. I don't really know whether Janome has a lot of AcuDesign users, so I don't know whether a lot of user feedback would accomplish anything. I truly hope that lots of people are using iPads because we have invested a LOT (Huuuuuuuuuuugggggge in Trump-speak) amount of time on a new iPad app! For now I would address this with Liz of the Janome Life blog. She's highly regarded by Janome and could have some influence.


Re: Acu Design or Embird?

Estelle Torpy
 

Hi Jenny,

I have found the app Acu Edit to work well for bringing in a design and adding lettering from one of the built-in alphabets, then transferring wirelessly to the 15000.
 
For more than that I have Embrilliance which costs more but does a lot more and like Embird comes in modules so you buy what you want from basic to full out digitizing.

I have Embrilliance on both my Mac desktop and PC laptop and I use a thumb drive to transfer designs to the 15000.

Using software is a personal choice since they all are a little different and have a learning curve. Fortunately these days, there are a lot of youtube videos that help show you how to do things that sometimes the manual doesn’t quite explain.

Good luck and happy embroidering,

Estelle

,___


Acu Design or Embird?

Jenny Warren
 

Hi!


I am looking for software which can cut, edit and manipulate embroidery designs. Many of the ladies in the sewing group I go to use Embird, and are very happy with it.  None of them have tried Acu Design, which is cheaper. I have seen Jim and Diane's videos on the My15000 App, and am tempted to buy this software.  Any advice as to its limitations?


Thanks,


Jenny.


Re: Backstitching problem

blue_lak <no_reply@...>
 

If it sews well with Accuflex, then try increasing foot pressure a lot and decrease thread tension with your regular foot. The Accuflex is physically moving both layers but the regular foot sometimes needs more foot pressure to keep the layers moving. 
Also check to be sure you are using the red dot bobbin case, and the same weight thread as top one. The yellow case has much more thread tension for the lighter weight embroidery thread.
Jan


Janome 15000 AcuEdit program

darlene Reese
 

Today I got a new update for the AcuEdit program.  It will not let name target my sewing machine.  I can transfer designs but it will not show my target machine, and no longer shows all the designs on my AcuEdit that are in my machine.  Has anyone else had this problem?  When I go to the AcuDesign program, it still shows a target machine and I can upload and download from there.  It just seems to have happened when they updated the AcuEdit program a pond I cannot find any information on the Internet. 

Any help would be appreciated. 

Thanks 

Darlene


[Sometimes updates are downgrades.]

I've had this problem on previous updates to AcuEdit, although not with this one. There are two options to try:


1. Double tap the HOME button. Find AcuEdit and swipe UP to terminate it. Then open it and try again.


2. If that fails try powering off the iPad and powering it back up again.


Re: Help

Linda <lindamrobertson7@...>
 

I checked my settings and turned in resume.
Thank you 

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 31, 2016, at 4:04 PM, ddnewkirk@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

If you have "resume" set in your setting, the machine will back up a bit before the thread break so you won't have a gap in the stitches.  This feature started with the 11000SE (including upgraded 11K machines).

I don't have the 12K but feel sure that option is available under the embroidery settings.  And, yes, the resume function is on the 15K also.  HTH  Dottie in Texas



---In janome12000@..., wrote :

Did I dream this or did someone post something regarding a thread break on the 15000 automatically takes you back to correct position??

On Aug 31, 2016, at 9:02 AM, cnystul@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

Linda there on the screen where you have your design is a -- and + in between the number of stitches on the design. The minus jogs back to where you want to start again. I usually jog back to just a couple of stitches already stitched and go from there. The + sign is to just ahead.
 
Cathy Nystul


Re: Backstitching problem

Connie
 

Thank you to everyone that replied to the back stitching question.  
I've since done some testing using basic Moda quilting weight cotton fabric. A new Shemtz universal needle and high quality sewing thread. 

I confirmed that with the needle plate attached with the large hole for 9mm stitching the fabric was being  pulled into this hole every time I backstitched. This totally makes sense!
So after switching to the straight stitch plate I sewed several more seams,  back stitching at both beginning and end of seam. The reverse stitching at the beginning of seam was very nice but at the end , a tap of reverse would scrunch up the fabric every time and allow only me to sew about 3 stitches. It doesn't look bad after pulling the seam out a bit but there would be times when I would want to reverse sew a bit farther for extra security.   
Test 3 and Test 4 used the  auto seaming stitches  with the automatic back tack at beginning/ and or the end. The Auto back stitch at the start of seam works well but at the end,  it is still pulling the stitches and making it messy. This is not acceptable  stitching for a machine of this caliber.  ( it can connect to wifi but sorry no neat Backstitch.).  

In a new project I am sewing several layers of interfaced fabric together for the Diva clutch wallet. With the Accufeed system it sews beautifully. 
BUT
I would definitely want secure and neat back stitches at both ends of construction seams and not large blobs of thread. 

Can some one else do the same sample testing and see if the same is happening??

Regards,
Connie S.







Sent from my iPad

On Sep 2, 2016, at 2:53 PM, Jane Handy jane.handy321@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

Hello Connie

Sorry to hear of your frustrations.  Have you tried using a doubled oddment of fabric - start stitching on that and then feed your actual project under the foot and continue to sew as desired until you reach the end of that seam, and then feed another doubled oddment under the foot, so that there is always something feeding through.  Then just trim off the oddments at the end.  Not a very good explanation I know, but hope it helps.

Jane, Worcestershire, UK


Threading issue

Linda <lindamrobertson7@...>
 

Does anyone have an issue where the thread gets stuck as shown in the above picture a dig course breaks.


This is the 12000?


Linda in Texas








Sent from my iPhone


Re: Backstitching problem

Jane Handy
 

Hello Connie

Sorry to hear of your frustrations.  Have you tried using a doubled oddment of fabric - start stitching on that and then feed your actual project under the foot and continue to sew as desired until you reach the end of that seam, and then feed another doubled oddment under the foot, so that there is always something feeding through.  Then just trim off the oddments at the end.  Not a very good explanation I know, but hope it helps.

Jane, Worcestershire, UK


Re: Help

Linda <lindamrobertson7@...>
 

Oh thank you for this information 

I'm really enjoying all the good information I am learning

Linda in Texas

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 2, 2016, at 9:03 AM, Faviola Martinez favymtz@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Re: resuming an embroidery design. The other thing that oftentimes isn't mentioned when having to back up and resume stitching because of a thread break etc. is that you must pull up your bobbin thread to the top, get a good size tail of both bobbin and upper threads and STITCH OVER those ends, otherwise the embroidery can possibly come un-stitched. The reason is that the machine doesn't make a new tie in (knot) the threads. This is another good reason to sit by the machine and watch it stitch, that way you know which direction the machine is going in so that you can hold the thread tails so that they get covered up.


Re: Help

favymtz
 

Re: resuming an embroidery design. The other thing that oftentimes isn't mentioned when having to back up and resume stitching because of a thread break etc. is that you must pull up your bobbin thread to the top, get a good size tail of both bobbin and upper threads and STITCH OVER those ends, otherwise the embroidery can possibly come un-stitched. The reason is that the machine doesn't make a new tie in (knot) the threads. This is another good reason to sit by the machine and watch it stitch, that way you know which direction the machine is going in so that you can hold the thread tails so that they get covered up.


Re: Sending design to machine

Betty Scott
 

Thanks for the explanation, Jim. Betty


Sending design to machine

Betty Scott
 

I have done a design in MBX5 which has 103,219 stitches but when I sent it to the 15000 machine (wirelessly) it says on the machine that there are only 100,825 stitches. I believe the maximum no of stitches for the 15000 machine is 200,000 so why are there less showing than in MBX? I have not stitched it yet but would hope that it is complete when I do. Betty 

[Sometimes stitches get lost in the couch cushions. Have you checked there?]

I suspect the only problem here is in what each party calls a stitch. An actual stitch that causes the needle to go into the fabric is 2 bytes of data. Jumps and color stops are each 4 bytes. An easy way to "count" stitches is to divide the total amount of stitch data by 2. That's probably what MBX is doing, or something similar to that. The machine is likely only counting those stitches that result in thread being used. Regardless of which one is the "right" one, I'm sure your design is complete.


Re: help with a machine

Brenda Kay
 

Thank you , Jan and Jim this  was a lot of help to me I will go to my dealer and check out these machines.


Re: Digitizer -

Linda <lindamrobertson7@...>
 

I totally agree with Cheryl that the dealer tells you how easy it is but it never seems to be that way.   And when you need help the dealer is not always able to help.   😟😩
And when you're not a computer guru it makes it even harder.

My dealer is an hour away and that sucks as well.

But I'll keep on keeping on.

Linda ( in Texas)

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 1, 2016, at 9:36 AM, Cheryl Paul capaul@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

More from the “Help Again” that Linda started. I know the frustration anyone has in upgrading or in fact just installing Digitizer V5. I purchased a new program so that I could also have my V4.5 as well - I’m being eccentric here but … Anyway, long story hopefully shorter, I needed to take the computer to a local shop for some help. The young fellow removed ALL of both Digitizer programs and re-installed the V5 and I’ve had no issues since, but I haven’t re-installed V4.5. I kind of like that I don’t need to put in a dongle when I go to open the program. In this process I also found out that if you uninstall the program, that particular use goes back onto the shelf and gives back an installation to you for another time. We can have 3 installations at one time - I personally only use one on my MacBook Pro. Now for my question or pondering. Why can Janome not have Wilcom develop Digitizer in such a way that Corel doesn’t bugger up the works on upgrades. I think that the whole process could be much simpler or it shouldn’t be sold as something that ANYONE can do: Jim am I wrong in thinking this way? It is extremely frustrating when a dealer tells you that you can just take a picture and this program will do wonders with it - they failed to tell me how much work and effort it would take. I didn’t have a clue and I’d worked with computers for over 20 years by this time. I did know it wouldn’t be a simple as I was told, but I certainly didn’t think it would be as hard as I found it to be. I was really befuddled at the time - thankfully, I found Trevor Conquergood and he was HERE in my city. I learned fairly quickly after spending one day in a class with him. By this time I had read the manual cover to cover, with a lot of dozing in the process on a trip to Red Deer, Alberta to visit our daughter. It was 10 hours of entertainment and confusion with it. I still see that little ship, used as one of the things to make, when I close my eyes. Cheryl - Saskatoon


[The curse of the 21st century descends upon us!]
I don't know for sure how long Wilcom has been developing digitizing software, but I'm fairly confident that it's in excess of 25 years. As we all know, the pace of technology advance is now at blinding speed, and Wilcom must do their best to keep up with that. One problem that Microsoft, Wilcom and many other software companies have is coming up with new things to sell. We're just about at the point of "peak everything" where everyone has almost all of what they will want. Hard goods manufacturers of things like cars, washers, refrigerators, etc. solved this problem by making their products wear out prematurely. Software doesn't actually "wear out", but the operating system that it runs on is continually being updated. At some point the old (Windows XP) is discarded and everything must be updated or die.

I wrote our first iOS app in 2011. Until this year I used only a tiny subset of the tools, but we are now working on a very large app that required me to learn a LOT of additional things. It will be released for iOS 9, even though iOS 10 will debut as early as Tuesday. Apple moves at light speed, and it's a huge problem for developers to stay current. The app I'm working on has some insanely complex code built in as a means of making it really easy to use. This is an iceberg sort of tradeoff - the easier it is to use for the user, the more effort has to go in behind the scenes.

In the case of MBX, Wilcom has a lot of developer talent and effort devoted to digitizing. Graphics, not so much. So rather than recreate that particular wheel, they hooked up with Corel. That was an unfortunate choice, as Corel was never the pinnacle of graphic development and a lot of other products are much better. Because of this, it's cheap and they desperately needed somebody to pick them up or they would die. That's why it's not fully integrated into MBX, and why things get so horribly mangled from time to time.

One of my favorite things about developing for iPhone/iPad is that there is ONE set of software that I have to use. Yes, it updates often, but I don't have to worry about some other product causing trouble for my software. As the tired old phrase says, "It just works." Granted since Steve Jobs' passing there have been some rough edges, but for me it's still easier, more reliable, and a lot more fun to use than Windows.

I share your frustration!


Re: second machine suggestion

Estelle Torpy
 

I bought the Skyline 7 as a take to class machine, I have a 15000 which I love. I find the Skyline 7 to have a beautiful straight stitch and to be a great all over machine. It is a 9mm stitch width and has the Acufeed system. I have used several of the feet from my 15000 on it without any problems. It is lighter weight so it doesn’t feel as solid as the 15000 but that doesn’t seem to affect how well it sews and quilts. The price and size were right for me.

Estelle

On Sep 1, 2016, at 5:50 AM, Judy Jackson judy.j282@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:


Hi Brenda,
Are you wanting a sewing only machine? If so the Atelier 7 (or Skyline 7 if you are in the US ). This is very near the standard of the 12/15000 machines. I love mine and use it to take to patchwork and quilting groups. 
There is also a Skyline 9 coming out very soon which is a combined embroidery and sewing machine. I don't know much about this one yet as its not available in the UK.

Judy, Cornwall 


Re: help with a machine

blue_lak <no_reply@...>
 

To add to what Jim and Jim responded....
The Skyline 7 software menu is identical in looks and function to the 12000. It has the same Stitch Composer and you can save favorite stitch settings. All the feet, including the Accuflex are also the same so if you buy an accessory foot, it fits both machines. It is a smaller and lighter weight machine than the 12000, but it's not a compact machine at all. I bought it for taking to workshops and use it for piecing and general sewing. One significant thing it doesn't have is the bobbin level sensor/warning, but I'm completely satisfied with the machine even with it's slightly smaller sewing space.

The 9400 is the same physical size and has the same software functions as the 12000 and the S7, but no embroidery. I don't have this machine, but according to Janome's website it has the same 11" workspace as the 12000, while S7 is 8.25". The 9400 weighs 29 lbs (12000 is 30), and the S7 only 24.8. Janome's site doesn't say whether the 9400 has the bobbin level warning but for the price, I'd be surprised if it didn't.

The other big difference is price. The 9400 is nearly double the retail price of the S7. Needless to say, local street prices will vary.
Jan in MD


---In janome12000@..., <judy.j282@...> wrote :

Hi Brenda,
Are you wanting a sewing only machine? If so the Atelier 7 (or Skyline 7 if you are in the US ). This is very near the standard of the 12/15000 machines. I love mine and use it to take to patchwork and quilting groups. 
There is also a Skyline 9 coming out very soon which is a combined embroidery and sewing machine. I don't know much about this one yet as its not available in the UK.

Judy, Cornwall 

Sent from my iPad

On 1 Sep 2016, at 06:18, Brenda W wise111451@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Could someone tell me which sewing machine is more like the 12000 ? I love the straight stitch on the 12000 and was wondering if there was just a sewing only machine that was really almost the same thing .
Thanks so very much

Brenda  W

The 9400 is probably what you are looking for, although the 8900 and 8200 are also 9mm sewing only models.