Date   

Re: Update computer to Windows 10

Jim Stutsman
 

The answer depends somewhat on what you mean by "update":
Possibility 1 - Buy a new copy of Windows and install it on an existing computer.
Possibility 2 - Buy a new computer that has Windows 10 already installed on it. This would basically be any new Windows computer.

If you choose Possibility 1, then you will not have to transfer any software. It will still be there after the update. Possibility 2 will NOT transfer software. You will need to reinstall from the original CD/DVD and re-download all updates. Your 11000 Customizer software is built for 32-bit processors. There is an update for that. Windows 10 is pretty much universally 64-bit, so the USB driver for direct connection to the machine will not work. However any USB flash drives will continue to work. Horizon Suite for the 12000 will work, but you may need to download the 1.2 update if you have a version 1.2 12000.

With Possibility 2 you will have to reinstall all of your existing software on the new computer. This usually involves downloading updates after installing, especially if the original software on CD/DVD was not made for Windows 10. There is software sold that claims it will transfer everything from one computer to another, but I'm dubious about that. Programs installed on Windows have bits and pieces tucked away all over the computer, and may have hidden copy protection elements as well. Places that sell computers, like Best Buy, may offer a service to transfer everything, but the Geek Squad "technicians" doing the transferring are usually not very experienced and definitely won't be familiar with sewing software. You're better off saving your money and doing it yourself.

All that said, when it comes time to update there are some things you should do:
1. Back up the C drive of your current computer to an external hard drive. You may already have a backup drive, so just do a new backup to be sure. If you don't have an external drive, get one before you start. It should have at least as much capacity as your current hard drive. If you are moving to a new computer, get one at least as large as the new computer's hard drive. This software is good for making the backup.

2. Pick a day for the project. Allow the entire day. It may only take a couple of hours, but you need to allow for things to go wrong. Work carefully, read every screen prompt before clicking, and don't be rushed.

3. If you are moving to a new computer, there may be an option to copy data from your old computer, or from your backup drive. This won't copy programs, but it can save you time and help you get the new computer looking more like the one you are used to.

Hope this helps!


Update computer to Windows 10

cnystul in Mn.
 

Jim I have two machines, 11000 and 12000. I need to update to Windows 10. Will I be able to transfer the software over, or what will I have to do? I'm scared to death to make this switch. Please any suggestions? Thank you! Cathy


Re: Alternate way to thread/wind a Janome bobbin?

Jim Stutsman
 

Yes, I know I forgot to attach the picture. Here it is:



Re: Alternate way to thread/wind a Janome bobbin?

Jim Stutsman
 

Wind a bobbin until it stops. Don't remove the bobbin or the thread. Loosen the screw circled in the picture SLIGHTLY, just enough so you can turn the piece that it holds. Turn this comma-shaped piece toward the front to make it wind more, toward the back to make it wind less. Tighten the screw and resume winding. Repeat until you have it as you want.

WARNING! 
That screw has a small nut behind it, inside the machine case. If you loosen too much, you will hear a soft "tink" sound as the nut falls to the bottom of the machine. Your dealer will not believe whatever story you came up with, because he's done it too. Also, do not attempt to fill the bobbin to within a thread width of absolutely full. At some point you'll have a thread that is a tiny bit thicker and it will get so full that the thread falls outside the bobbin and begins winding around the stem of the bobbin winder. This will create a huge mess. Your dealer won't believe that story either.


Alternate way to thread/wind a Janome bobbin?

JoAnn Novak
 

 HOW do I adjust the bobbin winder on the 15000 to wind a full bobbin???

Thanks,  JoAnn

Life's biggest decision is what you do with Jesus.

On 5/18/2021 6:18 PM, Sally on the WE(s)T Side wrote:
Oh, wow, this video may help me like the bobbin winder on the Janome 9400.  I still wind all of my bobbins on the 6600P because I like that bobbin winder better.

Thanks, Jim!

Sally

--


Re: Alternate way to thread/wind a Janome bobbin?

Sally on the WE(s)T Side
 

Oh, wow, this video may help me like the bobbin winder on the Janome 9400.  I still wind all of my bobbins on the 6600P because I like that bobbin winder better.

Thanks, Jim!

Sally

--


Re: Repair a Black Broken Hoop Locking Knob?

Kathy Skagen
 

Thanks for the update, Cat! I'm so glad that it turned out so well for her. And she has 2 very nice dealers!
Kathy

On Monday, May 17, 2021, 09:16:06 PM CDT, Cat - N via groups.io <navillusc@...> wrote:


Update on my friend's hoop issue...because if it happened to her, it might happen again to someone else (probably me...LOL)

She contacted a Janome/Elna dealer near her about replacing the broken hoop, and, having heard from my friend what happened, he told her if she had all the parts, he would see about putting it back together, so she took all the pieces to him so he could have a look.  Turned out, it was NOT the 'black plastic locking knob' that broke but "the screw that slides into the embroidery arm" that broke (in half).  As he asked, she called the dealer she bought her 14000 from (in another State) and they are shipping her the screw (approx. $10) for her SQ23 hoop.  When it arrives, the 'closer-to-her' dealer says he can/will fix it.  I haven't seen the 'hoop carnage' (she lives 45 min. to 1 hour from me), so the descriptions are hers...not mine...LOL.

Thank you so much for your help, Jim!  She greatly appreciated it, and the time you took to provide the information, and requested I extend her thanks to you for your help as well! 

- Cat (FL)


Re: Repair a Black Broken Hoop Locking Knob?

Cat - N
 

Update on my friend's hoop issue...because if it happened to her, it might happen again to someone else (probably me...LOL)

She contacted a Janome/Elna dealer near her about replacing the broken hoop, and, having heard from my friend what happened, he told her if she had all the parts, he would see about putting it back together, so she took all the pieces to him so he could have a look.  Turned out, it was NOT the 'black plastic locking knob' that broke but "the screw that slides into the embroidery arm" that broke (in half).  As he asked, she called the dealer she bought her 14000 from (in another State) and they are shipping her the screw (approx. $10) for her SQ23 hoop.  When it arrives, the 'closer-to-her' dealer says he can/will fix it.  I haven't seen the 'hoop carnage' (she lives 45 min. to 1 hour from me), so the descriptions are hers...not mine...LOL.

Thank you so much for your help, Jim!  She greatly appreciated it, and the time you took to provide the information, and requested I extend her thanks to you for your help as well! 

- Cat (FL)


Re: Repair a Black Broken Hoop Locking Knob?

Cat - N
 

Thank you, Jim. I will let her know. 

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 


Re: Repair a Black Broken Hoop Locking Knob?

Jim Stutsman
 

It's very doubtful that it's available to Janome dealers as a replacement part, though she could ask. It's also not a simple matter of switching out the knob, as the way it's attached could be tricky to work with. I looked at this once, and gave up on it. A new hoop will be pricey, so she might want to check eBay and Craig's List first.


Repair a Black Broken Hoop Locking Knob?

Cat - N
 

My friend has a Janome 14000 and was doing a fairly simple ITH appliqué on a t-shirt for her grandson. When she was attaching the hoop to the embroidery arm, the black, plastic, ‘locking knob’ broke off. She switched to a different hoop to complete the project, but would like to get the knob replaced. Is that possible or is she looking at buying a whole new hoop?

Thank you!

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 


Re: Digitizer 5

Barbara Wolcott
 

Jim, you are a treasure trove of information. I knew I could count on you to give me the information I need to make my purchase.  Now to start the search. 
Thank you so very much. 
Barbara

Barbara Wolcott
barb2220@...

On May 15, 2021, at 3:57 PM, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

There are legions of Windows laptops available, from many different manufacturers. Competition is so fierce that just about all of them are made to achieve the lowest price. Finding the "best" becomes challenging, because every single off-the-shelf model is compromised in some way to lower the cost enough for the manufacturer to make a profit. They are also mostly made to be disposable, and often people who get infected with a virus will just buy another computer and start over. To decide what's truly best for you requires you to know some basic facts:

RAM - this is Random Access Memory, meaning the actual chips that programs occupy while running. It's more expensive to make than hard disk drives. Typically a Windows computer will have 8GB, which is enough for Windows 10 to run fairly well, but not great for programs that use a lot of graphics and computation (like Digitizer). Plan on a minimum of 16GB for best performance. More is usually better.

Storage - RAM memory is completely emptied when power is turned off. Long term storage is managed with hard disk drives (HDD), which have gotten cheaper and cheaper. They spin during operation, and being mechanical will wear out eventually. The read/write mechanism is fixed in place, so reading data means waiting until its position on the "platter" gets under the read/write head. That makes them a LOT slower than RAM. One trick they use is to sell a computer is to offer a really large (1TB, which is 1,000GB), but relatively slow (and cheap) hard drive. The new trend is Solid State Drives (SSD), which as the name implies, have no moving parts. Data access is very fast, but these also will wear out eventually. Typically, though, they last a lot longer than a hard drive. I no longer buy anything else. Get SSD.

CPU Speed - This is a meaningless number. It's the equivalent to what a long deceased friend used to cynically say about cars: "It comes with high speed floor mats and racing door handles." More cores (also not that important) and higher megahertz numbers will be marginally faster, but not enough for you to notice.

Graphics - Another area for a manufacturer to cheap out in order to have a great price. The giveaway here is the word "integrated" in the description of the graphics. This means the graphics use some of the main computer's RAM for storing screen images. In programs like Digitizer this will result in poor performance, and it may not even work properly. Having a separate graphics card is best. These cards have their own RAM, usually in the area of 128MB or more. More is better in this case.

Case - If this laptop is going to be used on a desk with minimal travel, it doesn't matter much. But if you are going to be schlepping it to classes, retreats, grandkids, etc., then a plastic case (which is typical) is going to suffer. Some companies offer plastic that looks like metal, but isn't (Looking at you HP!). A sturdy aluminum case will cost more, but if you're going to be traveling with it, you'll be glad you spent extra.

Reviews - Last, but not to be overlooked. No matter where you plan to purchase your computer, you should check reviews. Sites that only sell computers may not have totally objective reviews. Amazon posts both good and bad. However ALL of the review lists on all sites tend to be gamed by both manufacturers and sellers. They will push 4 and 5 stars to promote a model, or 1 and 2 stars to take down a competitor. The only reviews you can usually trust are 3 stars. This will give you insight into what the purchaser didn't like. It may be something you don't care about, but if you see a trend you know there's a problem.

Since you mention Mac, which is all I use now, I'll add some comments about that. The main argument against Mac is the cost. Yes, there is a price premium. However the build quality is substantially better, and holds up over time much better. While you can install Windows on an X86 (more about that in a minute), I much prefer to use VMware Fusion or Parallels. These are programs that create a virtual computer inside the Mac. Typically they run almost as fast as a native computer. Backing up is easy, since the entire "computer" is one chunk of data that can be copied to an external disk drive. There are negatives - you still have to purchase a copy of Windows to use with these programs. You have to set up the virtual machine and install Windows yourself. It's gotten easier, but it's still not quite plug and play. One advantage of using a virtual machine is that you can run older versions of Windows, since the virtual machine is tailored to what you have. However you cannot use the Windows CD from an old computer, since those are all tied directly to the hardware they were sold with. You also can't use that copy of Windows your brother-in-law found that "fell off a truck". It has to be an OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer, which in this case is you) version, and typically is not cheap.

Final words on Mac - it was a watershed event when Steve Jobs announced that Apple was switching to Intel hardware in 2007, because it opened the door for Windows to be used on a Mac. Starting with the 8086 chip, then 286, 386, 486, etc. this family of chips has become generally known as X86. Windows was built for X86. However starting last year, Apple has started making their own computer chips. The first one, called M1, is a full computer on a chip and is astoundingly faster than nearly all X86 computers while using substantially less power. That makes for longer battery life. There is currently no way to run Windows on a Mac using the M1 chip set. However because everyone is flocking to M1 machines (guilty as charged, should be here next month), the X86 models are being discounted by all the usual big box stores. If you want a Mac to run Windows, make certain that it is X86 based, not M1.

Now, having told you far more than you ever asked for, I will retire to my office. Cheers!


Re: Digitizer 5

Jim Stutsman
 

There are legions of Windows laptops available, from many different manufacturers. Competition is so fierce that just about all of them are made to achieve the lowest price. Finding the "best" becomes challenging, because every single off-the-shelf model is compromised in some way to lower the cost enough for the manufacturer to make a profit. They are also mostly made to be disposable, and often people who get infected with a virus will just buy another computer and start over. To decide what's truly best for you requires you to know some basic facts:

RAM - this is Random Access Memory, meaning the actual chips that programs occupy while running. It's more expensive to make than hard disk drives. Typically a Windows computer will have 8GB, which is enough for Windows 10 to run fairly well, but not great for programs that use a lot of graphics and computation (like Digitizer). Plan on a minimum of 16GB for best performance. More is usually better.

Storage - RAM memory is completely emptied when power is turned off. Long term storage is managed with hard disk drives (HDD), which have gotten cheaper and cheaper. They spin during operation, and being mechanical will wear out eventually. The read/write mechanism is fixed in place, so reading data means waiting until its position on the "platter" gets under the read/write head. That makes them a LOT slower than RAM. One trick they use is to sell a computer is to offer a really large (1TB, which is 1,000GB), but relatively slow (and cheap) hard drive. The new trend is Solid State Drives (SSD), which as the name implies, have no moving parts. Data access is very fast, but these also will wear out eventually. Typically, though, they last a lot longer than a hard drive. I no longer buy anything else. Get SSD.

CPU Speed - This is a meaningless number. It's the equivalent to what a long deceased friend used to cynically say about cars: "It comes with high speed floor mats and racing door handles." More cores (also not that important) and higher megahertz numbers will be marginally faster, but not enough for you to notice.

Graphics - Another area for a manufacturer to cheap out in order to have a great price. The giveaway here is the word "integrated" in the description of the graphics. This means the graphics use some of the main computer's RAM for storing screen images. In programs like Digitizer this will result in poor performance, and it may not even work properly. Having a separate graphics card is best. These cards have their own RAM, usually in the area of 128MB or more. More is better in this case.

Case - If this laptop is going to be used on a desk with minimal travel, it doesn't matter much. But if you are going to be schlepping it to classes, retreats, grandkids, etc., then a plastic case (which is typical) is going to suffer. Some companies offer plastic that looks like metal, but isn't (Looking at you HP!). A sturdy aluminum case will cost more, but if you're going to be traveling with it, you'll be glad you spent extra.

Reviews - Last, but not to be overlooked. No matter where you plan to purchase your computer, you should check reviews. Sites that only sell computers may not have totally objective reviews. Amazon posts both good and bad. However ALL of the review lists on all sites tend to be gamed by both manufacturers and sellers. They will push 4 and 5 stars to promote a model, or 1 and 2 stars to take down a competitor. The only reviews you can usually trust are 3 stars. This will give you insight into what the purchaser didn't like. It may be something you don't care about, but if you see a trend you know there's a problem.

Since you mention Mac, which is all I use now, I'll add some comments about that. The main argument against Mac is the cost. Yes, there is a price premium. However the build quality is substantially better, and holds up over time much better. While you can install Windows on an X86 (more about that in a minute), I much prefer to use VMware Fusion or Parallels. These are programs that create a virtual computer inside the Mac. Typically they run almost as fast as a native computer. Backing up is easy, since the entire "computer" is one chunk of data that can be copied to an external disk drive. There are negatives - you still have to purchase a copy of Windows to use with these programs. You have to set up the virtual machine and install Windows yourself. It's gotten easier, but it's still not quite plug and play. One advantage of using a virtual machine is that you can run older versions of Windows, since the virtual machine is tailored to what you have. However you cannot use the Windows CD from an old computer, since those are all tied directly to the hardware they were sold with. You also can't use that copy of Windows your brother-in-law found that "fell off a truck". It has to be an OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer, which in this case is you) version, and typically is not cheap.

Final words on Mac - it was a watershed event when Steve Jobs announced that Apple was switching to Intel hardware in 2007, because it opened the door for Windows to be used on a Mac. Starting with the 8086 chip, then 286, 386, 486, etc. this family of chips has become generally known as X86. Windows was built for X86. However starting last year, Apple has started making their own computer chips. The first one, called M1, is a full computer on a chip and is astoundingly faster than nearly all X86 computers while using substantially less power. That makes for longer battery life. There is currently no way to run Windows on a Mac using the M1 chip set. However because everyone is flocking to M1 machines (guilty as charged, should be here next month), the X86 models are being discounted by all the usual big box stores. If you want a Mac to run Windows, make certain that it is X86 based, not M1.

Now, having told you far more than you ever asked for, I will retire to my office. Cheers!


Digitizer 5

Barbara Wolcott
 

I’m currently running Digitizer 5 on Windows7. Desperately need new laptop as program runs very slowly. As much as I’d like
to purchase a MAC, I feel I’m safer running it on PC. Looking for advice on best laptop to purchase.
Thanks-Barbara

Barbara Wolcott
barb2220@gmail.com


Re: embroidering on a sportswear shirt

Pixey
 

With the arm taking up room and having to move freely inside the throat of the machine, I do find it more difficult to do larger or bulkier projects on my 500e. But like you, I am a bit of a machine junkie and am spoiled with my 15000 for that particular use. Or as I also explain to my husband, there is no one perfect machine for all applications and purposes. Fortunately he gets it.

Those were great stories about your family. On the “challenge” of sewing straight seams down the borders, try getting some easy remove painters tape. Lay out the quilt and stick it on, then you can use the edges as a guide and it will stay in place while bunched up on one’s lap.

Pixey

On May 14, 2021, at 7:49 AM, Cheryl Paul <capaul@sasktel.net> wrote:

There shouldn’t be a problem quilting a quite large quilt on any of the Janome machines. You roll the quilt up and it fits quite nicely on the inside of the bed of the machine. I’m sure that it will on a 500E too. I haven’t actually done anything really large because I’m a bit lazy and also am terrified of layering the backing, batting and the top to be really secure. I haven’t a large enough table to use and I just can’t manage to do it on the floor. However, a friend told me what she does and I will try that. She asked if I had one of those cardboard cutting mats and I do. She says that she puts hers on her table and clamps one side down, and starts with the backing and smooths that out as best she can, clips in onto the board, then does the batting next and finally the top and pins that section with quilting pins. The weight of the quilt holds things down and the excess drapes of the other side. Once pinned she moves the quilt over on the board and secures the rest of the quilt with pins. She does a lot of quilts and has taken a few classes on quilting using the walking foot. She also does some free motion quilting but I’m not fond of doing free motion but I think I will try the scuffed flex on my Continental M7 or my 15000 - I have a few options as I’m a machine junkie.

I’m wishing just a little that I’d had this coffee date before taking young Gerald’s quilt to the quilter’s on Monday. Gerald is going to make little brother, Archer a quilt like his with the left overs for his quilt - I’ll find something to make it different but we can use up the extra squares. Piper, who will be 10 a few days before Gerald turns 13 still needs to finish her quilt - she used orphan blocks from the 3 quilts I made for her and her 2 cousins last summer. We just haven’t decided on the “hand look stitches” yet on the M7. They will be long rows, so we’ll have to devise a way to make “straight” lines down the borders.

Piper and Ava, picked out a design and Piper quilted that quilt - a good sized lap quilt on my 15000. These children must be accountants and engineers in the making as they are so precise. She got those blocks lined up EXACTLY on the centre cross-hairs - I was amazed and really impressed as she might be 10 but a very tiny light weight young lady. Archer hasn’t started sewing yet, except hand sewing, so he’ll be next. His sisters will teach him and so will his mother and I. My 6600 was given to them when I got a 7700 about 10 years ago. I guess they sort of fight over who gets to sew and have to bring out their Mom’s smaller Janome to sometimes settle things - Mom even has to wait her turn so the children tell me.

If I remember, I’ll put some pictures in the “photo section” once we get Gerald’s finished - Piper should be finished by then too.

Cheryl - Saskatoon




Re: embroidering on a sportswear shirt

June E Hudspeth
 

WOW oh WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! How proud you must be Cheryl!

I would be so excited to see some photos.

Thanks for sharing.

-----Original Message-----
From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> On Behalf Of Cheryl Paul
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2021 9:40 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] embroidering on a sportswear shirt

There shouldn’t be a problem quilting a quite large quilt on any of the Janome machines. You roll the quilt up and it fits quite nicely on the inside of the bed of the machine. I’m sure that it will on a 500E too. I haven’t actually done anything really large because I’m a bit lazy and also am terrified of layering the backing, batting and the top to be really secure. I haven’t a large enough table to use and I just can’t manage to do it on the floor. However, a friend told me what she does and I will try that. She asked if I had one of those cardboard cutting mats and I do. She says that she puts hers on her table and clamps one side down, and starts with the backing and smooths that out as best she can, clips in onto the board, then does the batting next and finally the top and pins that section with quilting pins. The weight of the quilt holds things down and the excess drapes of the other side. Once pinned she moves the quilt over on the board and secures the rest of the quilt with pins. She does a lot of quilts and has taken a few classes on quilting using the walking foot. She also does some free motion quilting but I’m not fond of doing free motion but I think I will try the scuffed flex on my Continental M7 or my 15000 - I have a few options as I’m a machine junkie.

I’m wishing just a little that I’d had this coffee date before taking young Gerald’s quilt to the quilter’s on Monday. Gerald is going to make little brother, Archer a quilt like his with the left overs for his quilt - I’ll find something to make it different but we can use up the extra squares. Piper, who will be 10 a few days before Gerald turns 13 still needs to finish her quilt - she used orphan blocks from the 3 quilts I made for her and her 2 cousins last summer. We just haven’t decided on the “hand look stitches” yet on the M7. They will be long rows, so we’ll have to devise a way to make “straight” lines down the borders.

Piper and Ava, picked out a design and Piper quilted that quilt - a good sized lap quilt on my 15000. These children must be accountants and engineers in the making as they are so precise. She got those blocks lined up EXACTLY on the centre cross-hairs - I was amazed and really impressed as she might be 10 but a very tiny light weight young lady. Archer hasn’t started sewing yet, except hand sewing, so he’ll be next. His sisters will teach him and so will his mother and I. My 6600 was given to them when I got a 7700 about 10 years ago. I guess they sort of fight over who gets to sew and have to bring out their Mom’s smaller Janome to sometimes settle things - Mom even has to wait her turn so the children tell me.

If I remember, I’ll put some pictures in the “photo section” once we get Gerald’s finished - Piper should be finished by then too.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: embroidering on a sportswear shirt

Cheryl Paul
 

There shouldn’t be a problem quilting a quite large quilt on any of the Janome machines. You roll the quilt up and it fits quite nicely on the inside of the bed of the machine. I’m sure that it will on a 500E too. I haven’t actually done anything really large because I’m a bit lazy and also am terrified of layering the backing, batting and the top to be really secure. I haven’t a large enough table to use and I just can’t manage to do it on the floor. However, a friend told me what she does and I will try that. She asked if I had one of those cardboard cutting mats and I do. She says that she puts hers on her table and clamps one side down, and starts with the backing and smooths that out as best she can, clips in onto the board, then does the batting next and finally the top and pins that section with quilting pins. The weight of the quilt holds things down and the excess drapes of the other side. Once pinned she moves the quilt over on the board and secures the rest of the quilt with pins. She does a lot of quilts and has taken a few classes on quilting using the walking foot. She also does some free motion quilting but I’m not fond of doing free motion but I think I will try the scuffed flex on my Continental M7 or my 15000 - I have a few options as I’m a machine junkie.

I’m wishing just a little that I’d had this coffee date before taking young Gerald’s quilt to the quilter’s on Monday. Gerald is going to make little brother, Archer a quilt like his with the left overs for his quilt - I’ll find something to make it different but we can use up the extra squares. Piper, who will be 10 a few days before Gerald turns 13 still needs to finish her quilt - she used orphan blocks from the 3 quilts I made for her and her 2 cousins last summer. We just haven’t decided on the “hand look stitches” yet on the M7. They will be long rows, so we’ll have to devise a way to make “straight” lines down the borders.

Piper and Ava, picked out a design and Piper quilted that quilt - a good sized lap quilt on my 15000. These children must be accountants and engineers in the making as they are so precise. She got those blocks lined up EXACTLY on the centre cross-hairs - I was amazed and really impressed as she might be 10 but a very tiny light weight young lady. Archer hasn’t started sewing yet, except hand sewing, so he’ll be next. His sisters will teach him and so will his mother and I. My 6600 was given to them when I got a 7700 about 10 years ago. I guess they sort of fight over who gets to sew and have to bring out their Mom’s smaller Janome to sometimes settle things - Mom even has to wait her turn so the children tell me.

If I remember, I’ll put some pictures in the “photo section” once we get Gerald’s finished - Piper should be finished by then too.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: embroidering on a sportswear shirt

Pixey
 

Hi Roberta,

I haven’t tried the DIME magnetic hoop the others were suggesting, but I did get the AcuFil Quilting Kit with the ASQ18b hoop.  I thought it might work better for quilting smaller projects than the bigger ASQ22 hoop for my 15000.   I would not recommend it for quilting projects larger than an 8” square.  The design of the hoop is such that there is really not enough clearance space in the gap between the side of the hoop and the support frame that connects to the pins on the arm for the bulk of working on the interior of a quilt and the large magnets holding it in place.

You can see what I mean from the picture from the Janome website.

Pixey

On May 11, 2021, at 3:11 PM, Roberta K via groups.io <robkon94@...> wrote:

@Cheryl-Saskatoon:

I have the 500E. I have been wondering how to hoop a quilt sandwich without it popping out of the hoop. Any suggestions from you or anyone here would be great. 

Thanks,
Roberta in FL


Re: embroidering on a sportswear shirt

June E Hudspeth
 

I have to say; I love hearing stories about "children" sewing or learning how to sew! It truly warms my heart.

Also, would you send your grandson to me for a few weeks, I'd love to have someone who can sew 1/4" seams consistently; as I surely can't, LOL.

-----Original Message-----
From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> On Behalf Of Cheryl Paul
Sent: Wednesday, May 12, 2021 8:13 AM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] embroidering on a sportswear shirt

Roberta in Fl,

I don’t have a 500E but a 15000 and S9. The 15000 has the quilting hoop which called the SQ22 hoop meaning that it is 220 mm X 220 mm (8.66" X 8.66”) - nice size. I haven’t used the hoop often for doing a project that requires many hooping but I have a few times. The magnets jumped off, of course, but I stopped and put them on again. However, it was never all of them but sometimes at least 2. When this happened, I’d put it back on and sometimes it jumped off again and again. This was extremely frustrating and then I though, “what the heck, I try to just carry on without it. The most guilty magnet was the upper left one and I found that it really didn’t change anything, even though it was a terrifying thought that I might have to take out stitching - Un-sewing is never fun. The first quilt I did was 7 years ago when my son’s last baby boy was born - in this quilt the design jumped out of alignment either to left or right and I didn’t notice until the design was complete. I may have been interrupted and had to shut the project down to be completed later - can’t remember. I was upset at the time but just carried on without fixing it. When the quilt was finished I couldn’t find the culprit block, so you see how sometimes it might not matter that it’s not absolutely perfect. That young man was a baby then and wouldn’t have known, his mother was elated that Grandma produced something for her 4th baby that was new and well Daddy figures his Mom is awesome and makes things for his children and watches over them and still does.

What I’m trying to tell you is “give the machine a chance” and “practice, practice, practice”. Things might not always work out the way they’re planned but we can’t give up. We do save hundreds of dollars by doing it ourselves and it is OURS, warts and all and we should be very proud of what we’ve accomplished.

Having said all that, the older brother age almost 13, has been with Grandma making his own birthday present - YES ANOTHER QUILT. This went to the long arm quilter in my neighbourhhood as it is bigger than I want to tackle and the quilting & fabrics are my contribution to his gift. I cut all the squares, he sashed them and sewed everyone and I have to tell you that he sews an awesome 1/4” seam allowance consistently. We had very few un-sewing times in the quilt. The funniest thing that happened on the first day, was that the tension was amuck on my S9 using the HP2 system and none of us noticed. Thankfully it was only 4 blocks and we didn’t have time to sew the individual blocks together. I noticed it the next week when we were sewing again. Needless to say we pulled that loose thread out and started over. I put him on my M7 and worked on the S9 until I got it figured out - I didn’t need a repair bill. The machine wasn’t full of lint, but the feed dogs were - how I forgot those when I last cleaned lint from the bobbin area, I don’t know. It’s something that I won’t forget again any time soon.

Just to add a little more bragging to this wonderful family (and I have 3 girls with 9 more grandchildren) that the girls aged 15½ and almost 10 are already very good seamstresses.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: embroidering on a sportswear shirt

Cheryl Paul
 

Roberta, I forgot to mention that I have a friend with a 500E and she purchased the DIME hoops and is quite happy with them on her trial run, last summer.

Cheryl - Saskatoon

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